ITS Standards Training

Transit Training Module Descriptions

 


MODULE 1: Introduction to ITS Transit Standards

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Description:
This introductory module provides an overview of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) transit standards for practicing transit professionals and decision-makers who are engaged in the deployment of ITS for transit. This course will highlight the program and organizational benefits, costs of the adaptation, and use of ITS Standards to support the deployment of interoperable systems. This module will also summarize and provide the context for the more detailed subsequent modules of transit standards training, and provide the audience with a useful roadmap of other standards modules they might want to view. As such, this module serves as a useful prerequisite for Modules 2 through 11, and is also recommended for senior transit management due to its review of benefits and costs, which are key issues related to the implementation of ITS transit standards.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:13

Instructor(s): 
Bruce Eisenhart
Vice President, Operations
Consensus Systems Technologies
Centreville, VA

Target Audiences:

  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Vehicle Manufacturers

Prerequisite(s):  None

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Define ITS transit standards and examine the benefits and costs of using ITS transit standards
  2. Introduce the use of the Systems Engineering Process (SEP) and articulate benefits of SEP in ITS transit projects
  3. Define high level technical and institutional challenges
  4. Identify the role of ITS Standards in Transit ITS applications
  5. Describe Roadmap for Transit Standards Modules

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MODULE 2: Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2

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Description:
This module (Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2) is the first of the two course modules on transit management using standards. This module provides the background for understanding transit management functions and the standards that facilitate the implementation of systems and technologies that support those transit management functions by:

  1. Briefly explaining the transit management functions and systems within the context of National ITS Architecture;
  2. Describing the basic taxonomy that will help define where standards should be considered within the functions;
  3. Discussing the functions of transit management systems to conceptualize technology implementation at an agency so that participants understand where the standards can be used; and
  4. Introducing systems engineering process (SE) and its use in planning, procuring and deploying transit management systems.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  2:00

Instructor(s): 
Carol Schweiger
Vice President
TranSystems Corporation
Boston, MA

Target Audiences:

  • Transit and Traffic Systems Acquisitions Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe (in overview terms) how transit management functions and systems fit into the National ITS Architecture
  2. Describe the core functions and taxonomy of Transit Management systems
  3. Briefly describe the functions of systems within the Transit Management taxonomy, and briefly identify the relationships and data exchange among Transit Management systems, Traveler Information, Transit Signal Priority, and Fare Collection systems
  4. Introduce the use of SEP when planning, procuring, and deploying Transit Management systems
  5. Explain the role of systems engineering and standards in procurement

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MODULE 3: Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2: Introduction to the Standard and Transit Architectures

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Description:
This course (TCIP 1) is the first of a two-module set on TCIP. This course will provide an introduction and overview of TCIP, concentrating on the contents of Volume 1 of the standard. The module describes the components of the standard, including the development of a transit agency architecture as a framework for procuring and implementing ITS systems, introduces the concepts of operations that illustrate how various business systems can be configured to exchange information, and describes the structural building blocks, data elements, data frames, messages, and dialogs that are used to standardize the exchange of information.

This module will provide the basic knowledge allowing transit agency staff and vendors to begin the process of applying a standards-based framework for procurement and deployment of ITS systems to better manage transit agency operations and assets, and to better serve customers.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:24

Instructor(s): 
Jerome M. Lutin, Ph.D., P.E., AICP
Senior Director (Retired)
New Jersey Transit
South Brunswick, NJ

Target Audiences:

  • Traffic Management Center and Operations Staff
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe the purpose and contents of the TCIP standard
  2. Recognize what is involved in growing traveler information and communication systems from basic systems to regional multi-modal applications
  3. Explain how TCIP is used to procure and implement transit ITS systems
  4. Illustrate the need for, and structure of, a transit agency architecture
  5. Articulate the fundamentals of exchanging information among transit business systems and devices using TCIP building blocks
  6. Summarize the content of the TCIP standard, tools, and available resources
  7. Provide examples of who is using TCIP

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MODULE 4: Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 2 of 2: Structure and Elements of TCIP—Accessing TCIP via TIRCE and TCIP Tools

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Description:
This course is the second of a two-module set on TCIP. It will introduce transit agency staff and vendors to the suite of tools needed to access and efficiently use the TCIP standard to create data exchange interfaces among various transit business systems. The tools are available as free downloads from the American Public Transportation Association (APTA). Information in this module will allow transit agency staff and vendors to apply a standards-based framework for procurement and deployment of ITS systems to better manage transit agency operations and assets, and to better serve customers.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:43

Instructor(s): 
Jerome M. Lutin, Ph.D., P.E., AICP
Senior Director (Retired)
New Jersey Transit
South Brunswick, NJ

Target Audiences:

  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
N/A
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
N/A
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Illustrate the “communications stack” and show how it relates to TCIP
  2. Describe the TCIP Implementation, Requirements and Capabilities Editor (TIRCE) and how it is used as the key to TCIP
  3. Identify and provide examples of data elements, data frames, messages, and dialogs
  4. Describe how data are organized in TCIP data exchanges
  5. Define a Profile Requirements List (PRL) and explain how it is used to specify TCIP requirements in a transit ITS project
  6. Articulate and describe the uses of each tool in the TCIP suite of tools
  7. Summarize the range of TCIP applications, implementation tools, and additional training

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MODULE 5: Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2

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Description:
This module (Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2) is the second of the two course modules on Transit Management Standards. It introduces hardware and software standards in addition to TCIP, and how to use them. The information in this module will help participants identify which standards are most applicable to a particular situation so that an agency can reduce the life cycle cost of technologies that support Transit Management functions and facilitate the integration with legacy or future technology systems. The structure and use of data exchange standards for Transit Management systems are described along with how to apply standards to the development of procurement specifications. Case studies are incorporated to enhance participants' understanding of how to use the standards.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:46

Instructor(s): 
Carol Schweiger
Vice President
TranSystems Corporation
Boston, MA

Target Audiences:

  • Transit Electronic Maintenance Staff
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
N/A
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Summarize key concepts from Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
  2. Illustrate the structure and use of data exchange standards for Transit Management systems
  3. Select appropriate ITS standards for data exchange among Transit Management systems, and between Transit Management systems and Traveler Information, Fare Collection and other systems (e.g., Traffic Management systems)
  4. Illustrate how to apply standards to the development of procurement specifications

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MODULE 6: Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2

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Description:
Training Module Coming Soon
This module (Traveler Information Standards, Part 1 of 2) is the first of two course modules on Traveler Information using standards. This module provides the background for understanding Traveler Information systems and the standards that facilitate the implementation of these systems by:

  1. Briefly explaining Traveler Information systems within the context of National ITS Architecture;
  2. Describing the basic taxonomy that will help define where standards should be considered within the functions; and
  3. Discussing the functions of Traveler Information systems to conceptualize technology implementation at an agency so that participants understand where the standards can be used.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:42

Instructor(s): 
Carol Schweiger
Vice President
TranSystems Corporation
Boston, MA

Target Audiences:

  • Traffic Management Center and Operations Staff
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe (in overview terms) how traveler information systems fit into the National ITS Architecture
  2. Describe the core functions and taxonomy of traveler information systems
  3. Describe the functions of systems within the traveler information and briefly identify the relationships and data exchange between transit management and traveler information systems
  4. Identify and describe how standards can be used to specify requirements for the procurement of Traveler Information systems
  5. Explain the role of standards in traveler information systems procurement

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MODULE 7: Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2

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Description:
Training Module Coming Soon
Using the background knowledge provided in Module 6 (Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2), this module begins the process of applying the standards that facilitate the implementation of Traveler Information technologies. It will provide participants with the knowledge needed to identify and select the most appropriate standard for their particular situation, to use software and hardware standards introduced in the previous module, and to incorporate standards into procurements. The structure and use of data exchange standards for Traveler Information systems are described along with how to apply standards to the development of procurement specifications. Case studies are incorporated to enhance participants' understanding of how to use the standards.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:54

Instructor(s): 
Carol Schweiger
Vice President
TranSystems Corporation
Boston, MA

Target Audiences:

  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transportation Operations Managers

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
N/A
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
N/A
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
N/A
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 6:
Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Summarize key concepts from Traveler Information Standards, Part 1 of 2
  2. Illustrate the structure and use of data exchange standards for Traveler Information systems
  3. Select appropriate ITS standards for data exchange among Traveler Information systems, and between Transit Management systems and Traveler Information, and other systems (e.g., Traffic Management systems)
  4. Illustrate how to apply standards to the development of procurement specifications

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MODULE 8: Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Understanding User Needs for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard, Part 1 of 2

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Description:
Training Module Coming Soon
Transit managers are looking at transit signal priority as a potential tool to improve schedule adherence, improve transit vehicle efficiency, make transit service more reliable, and improve transit vehicle travel times with minimal negative impacts to normal traffic operations. Signal Control Priority (SCP), which transit signal priority (TSP) is a subset of, is an operational strategy that provides preferential treatment (priority) to facilitate the movement of fleet vehicles such as transit, emergency service, and commercial fleets, through signalized intersections.

This module (Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Understanding User Needs for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on the NTCIP 1211 Standard) is the first of a two-module set in arterial management. This module will introduce participants to the benefits of an SCP system, describe the components that may make up an SCP system, and provide an overview of how to identify and use applicable ITS standards to procure and operate an SCP system. This module also helps participants understand the scope of applicable ITS standards and assists in identifying the user needs of an SCP system. Although the discussion in the module will be for an SCP system in general, the focus will be on transit signal priority (TSP), which is a subset of SCP.

This module will also provide an example case study, demonstrating how a transit agency might work with a traffic signal department to select an architecture for an SCP system, determine the features to be included in the SCP system, and how to develop a procurement specification.

The second module of the two module-set on arterial management (Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Specifying Requirements for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard) focuses on using the ITS standards to develop project specifications for procuring an SCP system.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:16

Instructor(s): 
Patrick Chan P.E.
Senior Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies (ConSysTec)
Flushing, NY

Target Audiences:

  • Traffic Management Center and Operations Staff
  • Transit and Traffic Systems Acquisitions Staff
  • Transit Electronic Maintenance Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Identify the needs addressed by and the benefits of Signal Control Priority on an arterial
  2. Identify the components that form an SCP System
  3. Describe the different SCP system architectures and the considerations in selecting an architecture for implementation
  4. Identify the interfaces in an SCP System and the ITS standards that address each of these interfaces
  5. Identify the user needs addressed by the standards
  6. Describe at a high level how to incorporate ITS standards into an SCP system procurement.
  7. Describe other arterial management tools and strategies

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MODULE 9: Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Specifying Requirements for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard, Part 2 of 2

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Description:
Training Module Coming Soon
This module (Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Specifying Requirements for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on the NTCIP 1211 Standard) is the second of a two-modules set in arterial management. The first module provides the background for understanding the standards that facilitate arterial management by describing how an SCP system works, introducing the capabilities offered by an SCP system, and identifying the role of standards in an SCP system. This module builds on the content of Module 8 and provides participants with detailed information on how to identify and use applicable ITS standards to procure and operate a signal control priority system following a Systems Engineering process.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:23

Instructor(s): 
Patrick Chan P.E.
Senior Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies (ConSysTec)
Flushing, NY

Target Audiences:

  • Integrated Corridor Management Project and Operations Team
  • Specification Writers
  • Traffic Management Center and Operations Staff
  • Transit Electronic Maintenance Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
N/A
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
N/A
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
N/A
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 8:
Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe requirements included in the National Transportation Communications for ITS Protocol (NTCIP) 1211 Standard
  2. Use the Protocol Requirements List (PRL) to specify requirements
  3. Show how to achieve Interoperability and Interchangeability using the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
  4. Explain the NTCIP 1211 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) interface and dialogs
  5. Explain how to incorporate requirements not covered by the NTCIP 1211 standard
  6. Identify a case study specifying requirements for an SCP System

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MODULE 10: Electronic Fare Payment Systems

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Description:
Training Module Coming Soon
Electronic Fare Payment is the automated calculation, validation, collection, recording, and reporting of passenger fare payments using some form of electronic media for rides on a mass transit system. The options available for electronic fare payment (EFP) systems have increased significantly over the last 20 years. However, for the majority of mass transit system operators in the U.S., paying for a ride on public transit still involves the use of non-electronic fare media including coins, flash passes, metal tokens, and paper transfers and tickets. These payment media offer few opportunities for automation and, as a result, provide minimal information to the agency on payments and ridership; require passengers to carry and use loose change in order to pay the exact fare; utilize manual, visual validation by vehicle operators, inspectors, and conductors; and are often inconvenient for passengers to acquire. Agencies universally embrace the need to adopt electronic fare payment systems that provide for more automated means of distribution and validation of fare media. This substantially improves the quantity and quality of payment and ridership data that is collected, and offers significant improvements in the convenience and ease of use for the passenger.

All transit agencies are motivated to periodically evaluate their existing fare collection methodology, equipment, and system in order to determine if conversion to some form of electronic fare payment (or an enhancement to, or replacement of an existing automated fare payment system) is required. Whether to identify the requirements for a replacement fare collection system to address the steadily increasing demands for better and more timely delivery of accurate ridership and fare payment data, or to fulfill the ongoing obligation to improve passenger convenience and promote use of mass transit, agencies must understand the features and benefits offered by the different forms of electronic fare payment systems. Today, such systems can be implemented to enable acceptance of magnetic stripe cards and tickets, contactless smart cards, and, where appropriate, could include fare payment using a mobile phone application or a bank-issued contactless debit or credit card.
This module provides a comprehensive overview of the standards, technologies, and techniques associated with traditional as well as leading edge electronic fare payment systems and their associated benefits, risks, and issues in order to enable participants to understand and select the solutions that best meet the needs of a specific agency.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:31

Instructor(s): 
Gary Yamamura
Principal Consultant
Three Point Consulting, Inc.
Oceanside, CA

Target Audiences:

  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Recognize and understand
    • Commonly used terms in electronic fare payment
    • The characteristics (e.g. architecture, features, costs, media, benefits, challenges) of the leading electronic fare payment methodologies
  2. Recognize and understand:
    • The applicable national and international standards, rules, and regulations for electronic fare payment systems and the benefits of applying those standards, rules, and regulations
    • Where the lack of applicable standards create logical gaps in fare payment architectures that must be addressed by the agency
  3. Evaluate the options for electronic fare payment by:
    • Assessing the unique implementation issues of the transit industry
    • Applying case studies of leading-edge electronic fare payment technologies and methodologies
  4. Apply newly developed skills to:
    • Assess agency requirements in order to facilitate selection of a methodology and architecture for electronic fare payment
    • Support the procurement and implementation of a new electronic fare payment system or existing system enhancement

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MODULE 11: Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms

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Description:
Training Module Coming Soon
The Connected Vehicle environment currently being researched by USDOT has the potential to transform surface transportation. For transit operators, this environment provides an opportunity to improve public transit service by increasing transit productivity, efficiency, and accessibility while providing its users with better transit services and information.

This module will provide participants with an introduction to the Transit Connected Vehicle environment, an understanding of its potential benefits to transit operators and users, and explain how to start preparing for the connected vehicle environment. The module will outline some of the data that may be exchanged between connected devices and the standards that support those exchanges, and illustrate how that information may be used to create a safe, stable, interoperable, and reliable transit system.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:36

Instructor(s): 
Patrick Chan P.E.
Senior Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies (ConSysTec)
Flushing, NY

Target Audiences:

  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Private and Public Sector Users including Manufacturers
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff

Prerequisite(s):  Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe the Connected Vehicle Environment
  2. Identify and evaluate the potential communications technologies that may be used in a Transit Connected Vehicle Environment
  3. Identify the ITS standards that support the Transit Connected Vehicles environment
  4. Describe the applications being developed in a Transit Connected Vehicle Environment
  5. Identify the challenges to the successful deployment of a Transit Connected Vehicle Environment
  6. Describe strategies and approaches to deploying a Transit Connected Vehicle environment

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MODULE 12: Electronic Fare Payment/Advanced Payment Systems: Open Payments Acceptance

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Description:
Electronic Fare Payment (EFP) is the automated calculation, validation, collection, recording, and reporting of passenger fare payments using some form of electronic media for trips on a public transportation system.

Included in the options available for EFP systems is the acceptance of contactless bankcards (credit, debit and prepaid debit cards that are issued by financial institutions) and mobile wallets linked to bankcards for the payment of fares directly at transit points of entry. Such acceptance is generally referred to as "Open Payments" within the mass transit industry.

Implementation of Open Payment acceptance as part of an electronic fare payment (EFP) system will create a number of technical and operational impacts for the agency and its system integrator although these may, depending on the implementation approach applied, be offset by certain benefits that are unique to this form of fare payment.

The purpose of Module 12 is to provide an in-depth review of the key stakeholders within the bankcard industry as well as the standards and specifications, technologies, regulations and techniques associated with the procurement and implementation of Open Payments acceptance capability. Contents of the module will identify and explore the challenges, risks, and benefits associated with Open Payments acceptance in order to enable participants to understand this approach and to evaluate its use as part of an EFP solution.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:36

Instructor(s): 
Gary Yamamura
Principal Consultant
Three Point Consulting, Inc.
Oceanside, CA, USA

Target Audiences:

  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Project Managers
  • Traffic Management Center and Operations Managers
  • Transit Budgeting and Accounting Staff
  • Transit Finance and Revenue Management Staff
  • Transit Grants Staff
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors
  • Transportation Department Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prior Knowledge for This Course

  • ITS Architecture and Systems Engineering knowledge
  • Understanding of fare collection policies and operational practices
  • General understanding of bankcard payment acceptance
Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2
Module 4:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles, (TCIP), Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A
Module 10:
Electronic Fare Payment Systems
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Define the stakeholders (including external parties), terminology, standards, specifications, and regulations associated with the Open Payments acceptance
  2. Explain the three main options for implementing Open Payments acceptance and their impacts on agency operations and systems
  3. Analyze the benefits, risks, and costs of Open Payments acceptance in support of the procurement and implementation of an Open Payments acceptance solution

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MODULE 13: An Introduction to Integrated Corridor Management (ICM)

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Description:
With ICM, agencies work together to optimize travel within the corridor by providing travelers with actionable information and implementing innovative operational practices and strategies, enabled by Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technologies.

To plan and implement these strategies, technology often plays a strong role. These technologies include parking management systems, Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL), and Automatic Passenger Counter (APC) technologies on transit, traffic-sensing technology on roads, and methods of information dissemination, both for travelers and transportation managers. It is anticipated that having access to and using this information will support better situational awareness and response than before ICM.

Transit agencies can play an important role in the process of improving mobility and reduce congestion on a busy corridor through the collection and use of real-time information on the location and capacity of transit vehicles. Real-time information enhances the ability of an agency to provide additional capacity to improve person throughput. Finally, ITS standards have the ability to facilitate integration of ICM technologies and systems. Standards for facilities, centers, and operators within a corridor support corridor management strategy, interoperability of systems, control and sharing of technologies and data, and interchangeability of technologies. Several specific standards are considered as a part of ICM strategies, and these will be introduced in this module.

Module 13 provides an introduction to ICM that includes highlighting pertinent transit and other standards deployed through the use of ICM case studies. There are four basic concepts within ICM that will be briefly described in this module: (1) Corridor modes of operation; (2) Strategic areas for ICM; (3) Conceptual levels within the corridor; and (4) ICM environment.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:46

Instructor(s): 
Carol Schweiger
President
Schweiger Consulting LLC
Boston, MA, USA

Target Audiences:

  • Consultants
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Specification Developers
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Service Planners
  • Transit Technology Vendors
  • Transportation Management Center (TMC) Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe Integrated Corridor Management (ICM)
  2. Identify and describe standards associated with ICM
  3. Describe actual ICM deployments, including how each ICM works, the role(s) standards played in enabling each ICM deployment, and the use of standards to address deployment issues.

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MODULE 14pt1: Applying General Transit Feed Specifications (GTFS) to Your Agency

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Description:
The General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) defines a common format for public transportation schedules and associated geographic information that is “open,” available, and widely adopted by transit agencies. GTFS “feeds” allow public transit agencies to publish their transit data and developers to write applications that consume that data in an interoperable way. GTFS is also a key component of Travel Information System (TIS).

Module 14 Part 1 covers static GTFS data such as schedule, bus stops, station and terminus information, and general fare policy data commonly utilized by transit agencies. This module provides an overview of GTFS and training about the structure and content of GTFS. Transit agency staff and their consultants will learn about how they can begin deploying the GTFS specification. The module will discuss the data content, data management, tools to implement the specification, and several case studies of agencies that generate and use the data specification. Additionally, the module will discuss how GTFS feeds can be used by third party developers, planners, and other users.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:43

Instructor(s): 
Scott Altman
Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies
Ramsey, NJ, USA

Co-developer: Bruce Eisenhart

Target Audiences:

  • Consultants
  • Developers
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Oversight Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
Module 6:
Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2
Module 7:
Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Define the scope of, uses for, and users of the GTFS specifications
  2. Apply the steps for translating your transit source data to GTFS files
  3. Improve GTFS Data Quality
  4. Illustrate how an agency implements GTFS

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MODULE 14pt2: Applying GTFS-realtime to Your Agency

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Description:
The purpose of this second module on GTFS (Part 2 of 2) is to focus specifically on GTFS-realtime. As an extension of GTFS, the General Transit Feed Specification Real Time (GTFS-realtime) is a data feed specification that allows public transportation agencies to provide realtime updates about their fleet. The GTFS specification is an open data format for public transportation schedules and associated geographic information. GTFS-realtime was designed around ease of implementation, good interoperability, and a focus on passenger information. This module aims to assist transit agencies in applying the open and accessible GTFS-realtime specification.

GTFS-realtime requires information from various sources to generate quality real time information, including GTFS. Module 14, Part 2 provides an overview of the GTFS-realtime specification, a discussion of its scope, how to implement it, and uses of the specifications, including how an agency would implement GTFS-realtime. Additionally, this module will describe downstream uses of GTFS-realtime feeds.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:36

Instructor(s): 
Scott Altman
Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies
Ramsey, NJ, USA

Co-developer: Bruce Eisenhart

Target Audiences:

  • Consultants
  • Developers
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Oversight Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
Module 6:
Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2
Module 7:
Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2
Module 14, Part 1:
Applying General Transit Feed Specifications (GTFS) to Your Agency, Part 1 of 2

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Define the scope of, uses for, and users of the GTFS-realtime specifications
  2. Apply transit source applications to GTFS-realtime
  3. Implementation of GTFS-realtime
  4. Illustrate how an agency implements GTFS

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MODULE 15: Emerging Evacuation Standards of Communication/Incident Management (ISO 19083)

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Description:
After major natural and man-made disasters, the ISO Technical Committee on ITS (TC 204) initiated a three-part standard called ISO 19083 Emergency Evacuation and Disaster Response and Recovery (EEDRR) to define the framework, data flows, and use cases that support the application of a decision support system for evacuations and disaster response and recovery as it applies to public transport organizations. The goal of the Emergency Evacuation Standard of Communication/Incident Management ISO 19083 standard is to save lives and aid recovery by using ITS technologies to coordinate a comprehensive transportation response to disaster. This includes evacuating people out of harm’s way and providing transportation support for all response to and recovery efforts from major disasters such as hurricanes, tsunamis, or catastrophic accidents.

The ISO 19083 standard recommends public transport serve as the primary mobility agent for all transportation-related coordinated actions before, during, and after a disaster. This represents a paradigm shift from past response and recovery efforts, which typically see transportation-related activities coordinated by emergency managers who rely on traffic managers and public transport operators to provide the services. The reasoning for this shift of responsibility is that public transport has the most experience and the resources to move large numbers of people efficiently and in a timely manner which is paramount before, during, and after a disaster.

The purpose of Module 15 is to introduce the Emerging Evacuation Standard of Communication/Incident Management ISO 19083 standard-based framework, used to identify participating organization roles and responsibilities, establish criteria for use of public transport, and support the development of an Emergency Evacuation and Disaster Response and Recovery (EEDRR) Decision Support System (DSS). The DSS will be used to assist, coordinate, and direct all transportation services including those used by emergency management, traffic management, and public transport. This module also identifies guidelines to improve coordination among regional authorities when public transport disaster support is required.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:33

Instructor(s): 
Dave Matta
U.S. Expert
ISO TC 204 Working Group 8 Public Transport and Emergency Services
State College, PA, USA

Course Developer: Paula Okunieff

Target Audiences:

  • Emergency Management and Public Safety Staff
  • First Responders
  • Transit Executives
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prior Knowledge for this Course:

  • General information on the National ITS Architecture/Regional ITS Architecture

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Describe the Elements of the Emergency Evacuation and Disaster Response and Recovery (EEDRR) Framework
  2. Explain roles and responsibilities of organizations (including Public Transport) in EEDRR
  3. Use Concept of Operations Template for specifying a Decision Support System for Public Transport Emergency Management
  4. Review Scenarios in which a Public Transport Emergency Management Decision Support System can be used

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MODULE 16: Introduction to Transit Enterprise Architecture and Its Benefits for Transit

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Description:
Transit agencies are implementing more ITS and information technology (IT) systems to improve the delivery of transit services and enable more effective control and management of the overall transit network. Often, the increase in IT/ITS projects also creates design, operations, and maintenance complexities for systems, data, and other technology components within a transit agency. For example, many ITS systems must communicate or share data with other systems. Further, with more ITS systems within an agency, interdependencies between hardware devices increase. As a result, it can become difficult to efficiently plan and troubleshoot business processes and systems.

The use of Enterprise Architecture (EA) principles and tools provide managers and staff better visibility into the components of their organization and the overall relationships among their enterprise’s people, processes, applications, data, and technology components.

The purpose of Module 16 is to provide an introduction to Enterprise Architecture (EA) for transit managers and staff. It describes the four layers commonly seen in transit enterprise architectures:

  1. Business Architecture
  2. Data or Information Architecture
  3. Applications Architecture
  4. Technology Architecture

In an EA, the identification of connections between components in the different architecture layers and the architecture drivers, such as goals and standards, along with their role, provide significant value to a transit agency. This module highlights a wide range of EA uses and benefits to a transit organization and its ITS efforts. To support the development of a transit agency EA, this module will briefly discuss some possible tools, resources, needed staff roles, and potential challenges. It will identify known EA efforts in transit. The module will highlight some of the possible beneficial relationships between an agency’s EA and its Regional ITS Architecture, standards, systems engineering efforts, and IT/ITS project architectures.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:59

Instructor(s): 
Nancy Neuerburg
Senior Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies
Seattle, WA, USA

Target Audiences:

  • Asset Management Staff
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Process Improvement Staff
  • Project Managers
  • Transit Budgeting and Accounting Staff
  • Transit Enterprise Architects
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit System Designers

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 3:
Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Define what an Enterprise Architecture (EA) is.
  2. Review the benefits to a transit organization of having an Enterprise Architecture (EA).
  3. Describe the general process for creating a transit Enterprise Architecture (EA).
  4. Articulate how use of EA principles can benefit a transit agency.

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MODULE 17: Accessible Transportation Technologies Research Initiative (ATTRI)

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Description:
The Accessible Transportation Technologies Research Initiative (ATTRI) is a joint U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) initiative, co-led by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA), with support from the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office (JPO) and other Federal partners. ATTRI is conducting research into the use of ITS and other advanced technologies to improve the mobility of travelers with disabilities. ATTRI will enhance the capability of travelers to reliably and safely execute independent travel. Transit agencies engaged or considering use of technologies to serve mobility needs of people with disabilities, veterans with disabilities, and older adults will benefit from the information provided by this module.

ATTRI leverages recent advances in vehicle, infrastructure, and pedestrian-based technologies, as well as accessible data, mobile computing, robotics, artificial intelligence, object detection, and navigation. The technology is enabled by wireless communications that connect travelers and their mobile devices, vehicles, and infrastructure. The technologies used by ATTRI provide almost ubiquitous access to a wealth of Realtime situational data sources, including data specific to transportation, municipalities, point of interest, crowd-sourced information, and accessibility data. Five (5) technology areas have emerged as ATTRI focus areas: wayfinding and navigation, assistive technologies, automation and robotics, data integration, and enhanced human service transportation. This module will provide current status of these technologies.

The purpose of Module 17 is to provide the background and scope of the ATTRI and specific activities. This module will discuss the five technology focus areas of the initiative and the four applications selected for prototype development. Discussion will include the ITS standards relevant to the application areas.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:13

Instructor(s): 
Bruce Eisenhart
Centreville, VA, USA

Target Audiences:

  • Asset Management Staff
  • Human Service Transportation Planners/Coordinators
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO) Staff
  • Mobility Coordinators/Managers
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit ITS Staff
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Recommended Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Understand background, vision, and objectives of ATTRI
  2. Discuss ATTRI-focused technology areas
  3. Describe ATTRI foundation considerations, application areas, and integration considerations

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MODULE 18: Transit and the Connected/Automated Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms

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Description:
This module is a continuation of Module 11 - Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms. Module 11 described the connected vehicle environment using Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC), relevant standards, and transit applications including those in the FTA Integrated Dynamic Transit Operations (IDTO) program.

The purpose of this module is to expand discussion on the connected vehicle environment for transit to accommodate “advancing automation” in the U.S. DOT 2015-2019 ITS Strategic Plan and in the recent initiative announced by the U.S. DOT.

Module 18 will provide transit agencies and other interested participants with an overview of developments in vehicle automation that complement vehicle connectivity for both bus and rail transit. This module will define relationships between connectivity and autonomy for transit vehicle operation. It will present examples of the state-of-the art transit vehicle automation applications including autonomous lane keeping and collision avoidance warning systems. This module also will describe how connectivity and automation are being deployed in rail transit, primarily in terms of train control systems for safety and capacity.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:53

Instructor(s): 
Jerome M. Lutin, PhD, PE, AICP
Retired/Consultant
Monmouth Junction, NJ, USA

Target Audiences:

  • Private and Public Sector Users including Manufacturers
  • Transit Management Staff
  • Transit Managers
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Service Planners

Prerequisite(s): 

Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
Module 11:
Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/
Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Define the relationships between connected vehicle and automated transit vehicle functionality
  2. Describe the potential for autonomous bus guidance for safety, access, and capacity
  3. Describe the development of automated collision avoidance technologies for buses and paratransit vehicles for operational safety
  4. Explain the potential for AV/CV technologies to support first mile/last mile transit connections for expanded mobility and convenience
  5. Describe the fundamentals of rail transit system connected/automated operation for transit safety and capacity

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MODULE 19: On-Board Transit Management Systems

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Description:
On-board Transit Management for buses covers technologies and systems that are located within transit vehicles that facilitate and automate operations, management, maintenance, safety, and security functions of public transit systems. While there are currently few standards that govern receiving and transmitting the data and information generated by these systems, the use of the existing relevant Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) standards facilitate the systems’ operations and maintenance.

An on-board system can include a vehicle area network (VAN), mobile data terminal (MDT), vehicle logic unit (VLU), equipment for supervisor/support vehicles, an Automated Vehicle Announcement (AVA) System (covered in Modules 6 and 7), an Automatic Passenger Counter (APC) System (covered in Modules 2 and 5), an Event Data Recorder System (EDRS), and Vehicle Component Monitoring (VCM) (covered in Modules 2 and 5), and On-board Video Surveillance System (covered in Modules 2 and 5).

The purpose of Module 19 is to provide details of on-board hardware and software standards. The information provided in this module will help participants further understand those standards that support On-board Transit Management functions for buses, specifically SAE J1587, J1708, and J1939 profiles, and how to procure systems using these standards. Topics covered in this module include single point logon/logoff, data upload/download from an on-board device, and the use of an interface control document (ICD).

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:37

Instructor(s): 
Carol Schweiger
President
Schweiger Consulting LLC
Boston, MA, USA

Target Audiences:

  • Consultants
  • Specification Writers
  • System Developers
  • Transit IT Staff
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Technology Vendors

Prerequisite(s): 

Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1:
Introduction to ITS Transit Standards
Module 2:
Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2
Module 5:
Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
N/A

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Review key concepts from Module 5 Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2
  2. Describe the details and how to use the most prevalent standards for On-board Transit Management systems for buses
  3. Illustrate how to procure systems using the most prevalent transit on-board management standards

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MODULE 20: Application of Arterial Management/Transit Signal Priority Standards

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Description:
Transit managers look at transit signal priority (TSP) as a potential tool to improve schedule adherence and service reliability, and increase transit vehicle efficiency with minimal negative impacts to the full traffic network operations. Signal Control Priority (SCP) is an operational strategy that provides preferential treatment (priority) to facilitate the movement of fleet vehicles such as transit, emergency service, and commercial fleets through signalized intersections.

Module 20 builds on previously developed Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority Transit Standards training modules (Module 8: Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Understanding User Needs for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard and Module 9: Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Specifying Requirements for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard).

Module 20 provides additional details on the standards that support signal control priority and how to use those standards to develop, specify, and test a TSP implementation. In addition, this module will present several case studies on how different agencies implemented their TSP projects. These case studies discuss some of the constraints that those implementations faced, the architecture that was selected to implement TSP, how the appropriate standards were used in those implementations, and how testing was performed. This module will provide a use case on how transit signal priority was implemented in a connected vehicle environment.

Available Resources:
PowerPoint Presentation: PDF, HTML
Student Supplement: PDF, HTML
Course Transcript: PDF, HTML

Running Time:  1:18

Instructor(s): 
Patrick Chan P.E.
Senior Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies (ConSysTec)
Flushing, NY

Target Audiences:

  • Integrated Corridor Management Project and Operations Team
  • Specification Writers
  • Traffic Procurement Staff
  • Transit ITS Contractors and Consultants
  • Transit Planning, Operations, and Maintenance Staff
  • Transit Procurement Staff

Prerequisite(s): 

Prerequisite(s) Specific to Curriculum Path Categories

  • Detailed knowledge of transit functions and data exchange among transit functions
  • Detailed concepts of transit management standards

Learning Objectives/Key Elements:

  1. Specify and test a transit signal priority implementation
  2. Describe how transit signal priority may be provided in a connected vehicle environment
  3. Explain the role of transit signal priority in Integrated Corridors
  4. Review case studies where standards were used to provide transit signal priority

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