Module 11 - A313a

A313a: Understanding User Needs for ESS Systems Based on NTCIP 1204 v03 Standard

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Slide 1:

Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. A large dark blue rectangle with a wide, light grid pattern at the top half and bands of dark and lighter blue bands below. There is a white square ITS logo box with words "Standards ITS Training - Transit" in green and blue on the middle left side. The word "Welcome" in white is to the right of the logo. Under the logo box is the logo for the U.S. Department of Transpotation, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology.)

 

Slide 2:

Welcome slide with Ken Leonard and screen capture of home webpage. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled "Welcome" has a photo of Ken Leonard, Director, ITS Joint Program Office, on the left hand side, with his email address, Ken.Leonard@dot.gov. A screen capture snapshot of the home webpage is found on the right hand side - for illustration only - from August 2014. Below this image is a link to the current website: www.pcb.its.dot.gov - this screen capture snapshot shows an example from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Development - Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office - ITS Professional Capacity Building Program/Advanced ITS Education. Below the main site banner, it shows the main navigation menu with the following items: About, ITS Training, Knowledge Exchange, Technology Transfer, ITS in Academics, and Media Library. Below the main navigation menu, the page shows various content of the website, including a graphic image of professionals seated in a room during a training program. A text overlay has the text Welcome to ITS Professional Capacity Building. Additional content on the page includes a box entitled What's New and a section labeled Free Training. Again, this image serves for illustration only. The current website link is: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov.)

 

Slide 3:

A313a: Understanding User Needs for ESS Systems based on NTCIP 1204 v04 Standard

Title slide Module A313a: Understanding User Needs for ESS Systems based on NTCIP 1204 v04 Standard. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Title slide Module A313a: Understanding User Needs for ESS Systems based on NTCIP 1204 v04 Standard - The slide presents a graphic image under the title that shows a CCTV field photo of a roadway condition on left and on the right side a structure with multiple ESS sensors. In the middle a map of an area is shown. The image together conveys that this module is about ESS sensors installed in roadway environment. )

 

Slide 4:

Instructor

Headshot photo of Raman K. Patel

Raman K. Patel, Ph.D.,P.E.

President

RK Patel Associates, Inc.

New York City, NY, USA

 

Slide 5:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 6:

Learning Objective 1

 

Slide 7:

Terminology

Sensor

Sensor is a device that responds to a physical stimulus and transmits a resulting impulse to a remote processing unit

Terminology: Sensor A photo of a roadway with some pavement sensors laying on it is shown.

Source: Temperature Probe, FHWA

 

Slide 8:

Terminology

Environmental Sensor Station (ESS)

Location on the Roadway/Bridge

Terminology: ESS Two images are shown to introduce what ESS looks like in the field. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology: ESS Two images are shown to introduce what ESS looks like in the field. This image on left shows a standing structure with multiple sensors installed on it.)

Source: MDOT

ESS collects weather data using range of sensors

Terminology: ESS Two images are shown to introduce what ESS looks like in the field. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology: ESS Two images are shown to introduce what ESS looks like in the field. This image on right shows a bridge structure where ESS is installed.)

Source: FDOT Bridge Wind Speed Monitor Installation. FHWA

 

Slide 9:

Terminology

Remote Processing Unit (RPU) is a Part of a Controller

Terminology: RPU photo is shown at left side. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology: RPU photo is shown at left side with an arrow from Management Station pointing to RPU. RPU is a 2070 controller that has RPU fitted inside.)

Source: City of Overland Park, KS

 

Slide 10:

Terminology

Road Weather Information System (RWIS)

RWIS is a network of ESS that relay road and weather conditions to a computer system

Terminology: RWIS Slide shows same images shown in title slide 3; to convey definition of RWIS.

 

Slide 11:

Terminology

Terminology; Types of RWIS - Three types of RWIS are shown on right side. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology; Types of RWIS - Three types of RWIS are shown on right side: At Top- a permanent fixed location based ESS shown with management station linked to RPU and an air quality sensor. In the middle, a portable mobile station is shown with RPU and ESS. At the bottom, a transportable-vehicle based ESS is shown with a link from the management station. The meaning conveyed states that fixed stations are location based, portable station can be relocated, and transportable stations are vehicle based: all convey weather data management station.)

 

Slide 12:

Terminology

Flashing Beacons

Terminology: Flashing Beacons. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology: Flashing Beacons - A photo of a beacon at location is shown with a flasher-a signal head fitted with a bulb. Two fixed Signs below indicate High Water and Road Closure message. A bulb image is shown on right.)

Source: FHWA

 

Slide 13:

Terminology

Example IOWA DOT RWIS. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology: Example IOWA DOT RWIS - A list of seven ESS sensors are presented, each pointing with an arrow to the tower fitted with relevant sensor. This image is on the right side. The list of sensors listed include: 1. Wind speed and direction sensor. 2. Antenna for communications. 3. Traffic speed and traffic count sensor. 4. Pan-tilt-zoom color camera. 5. Precipitation and visibility sensor. 6. Air temperature and Relative Humidity sensor. 7. Road surface temperature sensor and sub surface termperature sensor below pavement. At bottom left corner another image shows IOWA DOT center with a man explaining though Video their RWIS system. The link for this 2 minutes' video clip is shown below: http://www.iowadot.gov/maintenance/weather.html - The video explains each sensor and how overall RWIS helps IOWA DOT.)

Supplement icon indicating items or information that are further explained/detailed in the Student Supplement.

 

Slide 14:

NTCIP Framework

NTCIP Framework. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: NTCIP Framework: A graphic of the communication five levels of the NTCIP standards. On the right-side corner, there is a vertical text box that reads NTCIP 1204/NTCIP 1201 which points to Information Level Data Dictionaries and underneath arrow points to SNMP at Application level. This is shown to empathize where these standards are located. The next level is called the Application Level and includes C2C XML, DATEX, FTP, TFTP, SNMP, and STMP. The next level is called the Information Level and includes C2C Messages, Files, Data Objects, and Dynamic Objects. The next higher level is called the Subnetwork Level and includes PPP, Ethernet, and PMPP. The next level is called the Transport Level and includes TCP/IP, UDP/IP, and T2/NULL. These boxes are connected to an overarching box also in the Information Level labeled Functional Area Data Dictionaries with the left-hand side identifying C2C Data Dictionaries and the right-hand side labeled NTCIP Data Dictionaries. The bottom level, last level, is the Plant Level and includes boxes for Dial-up, Fiber, Coax, Wireless, Twisted Pair, and Leased Line.)

Source: NTCIP Guide

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 15:

Reference Architecture for ESS

Major Components of ESS System

Major Components of ESS System. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Major Components of ESS System - A layout is shown: On the left a management station is connecting to a field ESS system shown on the right side. ESS system has three boxes showing Sensor manager, ESS manager and PTS manager. Several sensors are connected to each manger.)

 

Slide 16:

History of NTCIP 1204 Standard

ESS Standard has Evolved to v04 in 2016

NTCIP 1204 v01

(1998), Non-SEP

(2001), Amendment-1, Reflected Actual Implementations.

NTCIP 1204 v02

(2007), SEP-based

Added new Features, e.g. de-icing.

NTCIP 1204 v03

(2009), Updated SEP content

Added test procedures, issued Errata for Annex C.

NTCIP 1204 v04

(2015), Supports newly identified user needs, such as Connected Vehicles (CV), reflects lessons learned from deployments.

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 17:

Standard Organization

Structure of the Standard (NTCIP 1204 v04)

Section 1 - General

Section 2 - Concept of Operations (Features-User Needs)

Section 3 - Functional Requirements

Section 3.3 - Protocol Requirements List (PRL)

Section 4 - Dialogs

Section 5 - Object Definitions (Management Information Base-MIB)

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 18:

Standard Organization

Structure of the Standard (NTCIP 1204 v04)

Annex A - Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)

Annex B - Object Tree

Annex C - Test Procedures

Annex D - Documentation of Revisions

Annex E - User Requests

Annex F - Generic Clauses

Annex G - Encoding of Sample Block Objects

Annex H - Controller Configuration Objects

 

Slide 19:

Standard Organization

How Does the Structure Relate to the Agency ESS/RWIS Specification?

The slide has a slanted text box on left with ConOps, Requirements and Design. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: The slide has a slanted text box on left with ConOps, Requirements and Design. Text from right is pointing to each of these with an arrow.-

)

 

Slide 20:

Standard Organization

Standard Structure Supports

Road Weather Data Collection Service Package

ESS relationship to ITS service package MC03 is shown here. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: ESS relationship to ITS service package MC03 is shown here, with focus on TMC interface. RWIS Service Package: The slide has a layout with boxes and dataflow arrows Each box is marked with text. The layout conveys the RWIS service package. The meaning is that NTCIP 1204 does support RWIS service package. MC03-Road Weather Data Collection (Service Package) Description - This service package collects current road and weather conditions using data collected from environmental sensors deployed on and about the roadway (or guideway in the case of transit related rail systems). In addition to fixed sensor stations at the roadside, sensing of the roadway environment can also occur from sensor systems located on Maintenance and Construction Vehicles. The collected environmental data is used by the Weather Information Processing and Distribution service package to process the information and make decisions on operations. The collected environmental data may be aggregated, combined with data attributes and sent to meteorological systems for data qualification and further data consolidation. The service package may also request and receive qualified data sets from meteorological systems.)

 

Slide 21:

Standard Organization

User Needs (Features) NOT Covered by v04 Standard

Authors relevant description: User Need: A photo on right side shows two photos of roadway conditions-bad weather and an image of a tower equipped with ESSs. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

Source: Iowa DOT

 

Slide 22:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 23:

Question

Which of the following is NOT a Correct Statement Related to the ESS Standard?

Answer Choices

  1. Standard Supports RWIS
  2. Standard Supports Communications Interface
  3. Provides Traceability Tools
  4. States Sensor Hardware Requirements

 

Slide 24:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Standard Supports RWIS
Incorrect. Statement is true, standard does support a range of environmental sensors.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Standard Supports Communications Interface
Incorrect. Statement is true, standard does provide communications capabilities between ESS and a management station.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Provides Traceability Tools
Incorrect. Statement is true, standard provides PRL and RTM tools which a project can tailor for local needs.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) States Sensors Hardware Requirements
Correct! Statement is FALSE, ESS standard does not cover physical-hardware requirements for sensors.

 

Slide 25:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 26:

Learning Objective 2

 

Slide 27:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

A roadway image from Caltrans. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: A roadway image from Caltrans with vehicles moving in both direction is shown with text boxes on right. The slide conveys the Roadway environment. Who is affected is listed as Roadways, Motorists, Vehicles, and Assets.)

 

Slide 28:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Roadway Operational Environment Weather Variables

A roadway CCTV image is shown on the right side. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: A roadway CCTV image is shown on the right side, a regional map is the background. Bulleted items are listed as follows:

)

 

Slide 29:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Weather Events Adversely Impact Roadway Operations

Several images of roadways with weather events. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Several images of roadways with weather events are shown on this slide: the top two show traffic flow in flooded roadway and Houston highways under water. The meaning of this slide is that weather events adversely impact roadway operations.)

Source: TX DOT

Several images of roadways with weather events. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Several images of roadways with weather events are shown on this slide: these show a roadway with high wind condition, and a roadway with snow. The meaning of this slide is that weather events adversely impact roadway operations.)

Source: FHWA

Several images of roadways with weather events. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Several images of roadways with weather events are shown on this slide: this one shows a roadway with snow and three vehicles removing snow. The meaning of this slide is that weather events adversely impact roadway operations.)

Source: Iowa DOT

 

Slide 30:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Authors relevant description: Loss of Access routes is shown with a photo of CBD of Houston flooded.

 

Slide 31:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Loss of Access Routes

Courtesy: Michael Martinez and Ben Brumfield, CNN

Authors relevant description: A photo of flooded roadway is shown.

 

Slide 32:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Operational Concerns for Roads-Drivers-Vehicles

  Adverse Impacts
Roadway Conditions Reduced Capacity/ Access-Throughput-Speed
Visibility Impairment Driver Behavior-Reactions-Safety
Traction, Stability Maneuverability Vehicle Performance, Skidding-Crash Potential

 

 

Slide 33:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Measuring Adverse Impacts on Safety

A Weather fatalities chart is shown with bars. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: A Weather fatalities chart is shown with bars. The chart shows 155 fatalities were attributed to flood in 2015. Other bars shown for heat, tornado etc. The Key Message: Weather impacts on safety are 1.5 million vehicular crashes, resulting in 800,000 injuries and 7,000 fatalities nationally. For example, flood alone stands out in 2015 in terms of fatalities-recent events in 2016 also indicate adverse impacts in cities such as Houston and parts of Midwest region.)

Source: NOAA, National Weather Service

(Based on NHTSA and FHWA 2015 Data)

 

Slide 34:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Measuring Adverse Impacts on Mobility

Authors relevant description: A photo shows vehicles moving in a flooded roadway is shown.

Source : Caltrans

 

Slide 35:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Measuring Adverse Impacts on Productivity

"The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, which had $189.2 million budgeted for the 2013-14 winter, spent $284 million."-PennDOT

A highway pileup of multiple caused by bad winter snow- weather is shown in the photo.

Source: Wyoming DOT

 

Slide 36:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Operational Need

Assess Roadway Condition with Sensors-Supplied Data

Central System Management

Station RWIS

Photo on the left shows a TMC

Source: FHWA: WY TMC Note: Wyoming DOT has 62 RWIS Operational

Photo on upper right shows a roadway with overpass

Source: FHWA

Sensors Detect Roadway Conditions

 

Slide 37:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

User Needs are Translations of Operational Needs

2.5.2.1 - Monitor Weather Conditions

(affect the transportation system)

2.5.2.1.2 - Monitor Atmospheric Pressure

2.5.2.1.3 - Monitor Winds

2.5.2.1.4 - Monitor Air Temperature

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 38:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Operational Need

Deploy RWIS as a Decision Support System to Take Action

RWIS Decision Support Tool. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Operational Need - RWIS Decision Support Tool - A TMC is shown taking actions on left side by showing connecting to three text boxes on right side: Advisory, Control and Treatment.)

 

Slide 39:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Weather Related Advisory Actions

DMS photos indicate advisory messages: Dense Fog Ahead

DMS photos indicate advisory messages: Hurrican Warning - Seek Shelter

Source: NJTPA-Daktronics

DMS photos indicate advisory messages: roadway conditions

Source: Manual Joshi, NYCDOT TMC

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 40:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Weather Related Control Actions

DMS photos indicate control action messages: Icy conditions

Source: National Conference of State Legislatures

DMS photos indicate control action messages: Road closed due to fog

Source: Tennessee Ramp Gate-FHWA

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 41:

What are Your Operational Objectives?

Roadway Treatment Actions

Two DMSs on left show treatment actions on roadway.

DMSs on right show black ice conditions on roadways.

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 42:

How Does ESS Standard Support Operational Needs-Features?

Annex F.1.1: Architectural Needs Supports Operational Environment

F.1.1.1. - Provide Live Data: When we always have ON connection

F.1.1.2 - Provide Compressed Data

F.1.1.3 - Provide Off-line Log Data

F.1.2 - Generic Features

Authors relevant description: A TMC on left is shown connecting to a RPU in the ESS controller.

 

Slide 43:

How Does ESS Standard Support Operational Needs-Features?

Categories of Features Supported

Key Message: Operational needs focus on the end use of the ESS device and NTCIP 1204 divides these into 3 major categories. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Key Message: Operational needs focus on the end use of the ESS device and NTCIP 1204 divides these into 3 major categories:

ESS Manager Features

Section 2.5.1

Sensor Manager Features

Section 2.5.2

PTS Manager Features

Section 2.5.3

PTS-Pavement Treatment System.)

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 44:

How Does ESS Standard Support Operational Needs-Features?

ESS Manager Features Supported by Standard

 

Slide 45:

How Does ESS Standard Support Operational Needs-Features?

Example: 2.5.1.2 Monitor Door Status

"A transportation system operator may wish to inquire if any doors on the ESS equipment are open..." _

Authors relevant description: Same as above slide 42, except TMC is connecting to ESS controller.

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 46:

Deployment Examples

Idaho DOT Statewide Deployments of Weather Stations

IDAHO DOT deployments of Weather Stations. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Key Message: IDAHO DOT deployments of Weather Stations. Idaho DOT RWIS is shown with field region where ESSs exist, CCTV image and weather data.)

 

Slide 47:

Deployment Examples

A combined deployment example from FHWA source. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: A combined deployment example from FHWA source. Top three images show maps where ESSs are located, bottom image on left shows a controller, middle image shows TMC, and right most images shows a pole with ESS mounted on it.)

Source: FHWA

 

Slide 48:

Deployment Examples

FDOT Example with sensors identified. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: FDOT Example with sensors identified such as Ultrasonic Wind Sensor, Road Weather Camera, Precipitation Identifier, etc. Florida I-10 field images are showing ESSs, weather data in text boxes and ESS controller.)

Source: FHWA

 

Slide 49:

Deployment Examples

Purpose of ESS Deployments by Transportation Agencies

A Map of the US is shown with ESS installations in each state. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Terminology - A Map of the US is shown with ESS installations in each state. For example, California has 112 and Alaska has 118 ESS in 2008. National Total is 2499, with 2017 ESS in RWIS.)

Source: http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/weather/mitigating_impacts/essmap.htm: FHWA 2008

 

Slide 50:

Deployment Examples: ESS Manager

2.5.1.3 Monitor Power

A transportation system operator may wish to monitor the power for the ESS to ensure proper operation.

2.5.1.4 Monitor Mobile Station Data

A transportation system operator may wish to monitor the movements of a mobile ESS and, if it is part of a mobile pavement treatment system, monitor the chemicals being dispersed.

2.5.1.1 Generic Features (Device ID...)

Photo of technicians installing field unit.

Source: UDOT

Example of portable ESS station unit.

Source: IOWADOT

 

Slide 51:

Deployment Examples: Sensor Manager

Simple diagram of a sensor manager connecting to sensors in field.

2.5.2 Sensor Manager Features

 

Slide 52:

Deployment Examples: PTS Manager

2.5.3.2 Manage Mobile Spray System

A transportation system operator may need to manage the application of anti-icing or de-icing chemicals from a mobile pavement treatment system (e.g., a salt truck).

A photo of roadway with snow removal trucks moving is shown and photo on right shows a sanitation truck spraying deicing liquid on the pavement.

 

Slide 53:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 54:

Question

Which of the following is NOT Part of the ESS Standard?

Answer Choices

  1. Collection of atmospheric and environmental data.
  2. Monitoring the status of the ESS.
  3. Assessing if a ESS is a permanent, transportable or mobile.
  4. Creating a Weather Advisory Message on a Variable Message Sign (VMS).

 

Slide 55:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Collection of atmospheric and environmental data.
Incorrect. This feature is supported by the standard.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Monitoring the status of the ESS.
Incorrect. This feature is supported by the standard.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Assessing if a ESS is a permanent, transportable or mobile.
Incorrect. This feature is Mandatory to conform to the ESS standard. All ESS specification must include this user need.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Creating a Weather Advisory Message on a Variable Message Sign (VMS).
Correct! ESS standard does NOT support it, but NTCIP 1203 DMS standard does.

 

Slide 56:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 57:

What is a PRL?

Protocol Requirements List (PRL) is a Table, a Matrix

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FRID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2 Sensor Manager Features 0.3(1..*) Yes/No  

 

Slide 58:

What is a PRL?

Standardized Relationship Provided by the Standard

Standardized relationship is depicted. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Standardized relationship is depicted as: One user need pointing to the right to one requirement with an arrow; one user need pointing to two requirements, and many user needs pointing to one requirement.)

 

Slide 59:

What is a PRL?

Provides Guidance

(NTCIP 1204 v4, Section 3.3.3, Page 32)

Table 6 Protocol Requirements List

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FRID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications

Agency completes the rows with text from the PRL provided by the standard object PRL

 

Slide 60:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard (Section 3.3)

PRL table is illustrated. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: PRL table is illustrated with arrows going to sentence below: first line is headings' second line has an example of user need, Section number 2.5.2.2 is shown.

User Need Columns

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Heed FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.1.2 Monitor Door Status 0 Yes/No  
    3.5.1.2.1 Retrieve ESS DoorSlatus M Yes/NA  

1st line is the headings of the PRL Table (users cannot modify columns)

2nd line, an example of a user need, with section number-2.5.1.2 and its title

Section number 2.5.1.2, (page 16), find the optional user need; and you must decide if it is desired for your project implementation.)

Supplement icon indicating items or information that are further explained/detailed in the Student Supplement.

 

Slide 61:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard (Section 3.3)

Conformance Column

PRL table is illustrated. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: PRL table shows fifth column as Conformance. An example of Optional O is shown below PRL with arrow pointing to O, a group of 5 user needs, one must be selected.

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Heed FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2 5.2.1.2 Monitor Winds   0.5 in Yes / No / NA  

Example: Determine ESS Type, is it permanent, transportable or mobile?)

 

Slide 62:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard (Section 3.3)

Support/Project Requirement Column

PRL table is illustrated. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: PRL table is shown with Sixth column as Support, which is selected Yes or NO. What the agency must do is indicated by selecting YES or NO, is shown with an arrow.

)

 

Slide 63:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard (Section 3.3)

Additional Project Requirements-Last Column

PRL table is illustrated. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Last column of PRL is Additional requirements, is available to provide additional details in the table.

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Heed FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.1.4 Monitor Mobile Station Data Mobile:M Yes / NA  
    3.5.1.3.1 Retrieve Mobile ESS Movement M Yes / NA NTCIP 1204 v04 does not impose any accuracy requirements. Any accuracy requirements should be inserted here.

Provides any additional details about the specific implementation.)

 

Slide 64:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard (Section 3.3)

Agency Determines if an Optional ESS User Need is Required

2.5.2.1.2 Monitor Winds

A transportation system operator may need to monitor the current wind conditions in the vicinity of the ESS and to configure and retrieve the metadata for the wind measurements. This feature allows an operator to determine if vehicle restrictions on a given roadway or bridge span should be issued or to restrict roadway maintenance (e.g., fire alerts).

If the agency selects YES, then certain requirements will be allocated in the project PRL

A table of PRL is shown with a photo image of a highway section. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: A table of PRL is shown with a photo image of a highway section. Key Message: Slide brings up the user need shown in the PRL, and explains, if it is needed or not with rendering or BOS example. First box shows the example user need partial statement; Second box states if it is desired; Third box states, may be not for BOS.)

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 65:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard

Completing a Project PRL: Functional Requirements

Within the PRL this user need  functional requirement relationship is shown via the functional requirements ID. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Within the PRL this user need – functional requirement relationship is shown via the functional requirements ID and the Functional requirements description column organized right underneath the user needs that these functional requirements address. Figure shows another capture from the PRL table with the focus on the Functional Requirement (FR) identification column and at the Functional Requirement column which contains the description of the requirement. A populated PRL is shown with example requirements, FR ID Functional Requirements, Conformance and Support columns highlighted:.

Section number and the Functional Requirement

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.1.2 Monitor Winds 0.5(1..*) Yes / No / NA  
    3.5.2.1.2 (Wind) Retrieve Metadata for Each Wind Sensor - Text Description 0 Yes / No / NA  
    3.5.2.1.11.1 (WindLoc) Retrieve Metadata for Each Wind Sensor - Location 0 Yes / No / NA  
    3.5.2.1.11.2 Retrieve Metadata for Each Wind Sensor - Sensor Information 0 Yes / No / NA  
    3.5.2.1.11.3 Configure Wind Sensor Metadata - Location Wind:0; WindLoc:0 Yes / No / NA  
    3.5.2.3.2.2 Retrieve Wind Data M Yes / NA  

)

 

Slide 66:

Parts of PRL Provided in the Standard

Partially Filled-in PRL that Provides Standardized Requirement(s) Allocated to Each User Need

This slide presents the structure of a PRL. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Key Message: What is a PRL? This slide presents the structure of a PRL, as mapping table and shows rows and columns organization.

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.4 Architectural Needs M Yes  
2.4.1 Generic Architectural Heeds M Yes  
2.5 Features   Yes  
2.5.1 ESS Manager Features M Yes  
2.5.1.1 Generic Features M Yes  
2.5.1.2 Monitor Door Status 0 Yes / No  
    3.5.1 2.1 Retrieve ESS Door Status M Yes / No  
2.5.1.3 Monitor Power 0 Yes / No  
3.5.1.2.2 Retrieve Battery Status 0.1 (1.*) Yes / No / NA  
3.5.1.2.3 Retrieve Line Volts 0.1 (1.*) Yes / No / NA  
2.5.1.4 Monitor Mobile Station Data Mobile:M Yes / NA  
    3.5.1.3.1 Retrieve Mobile ESS Movement M Yes / NA NTCIP 1204 vC4 does not impose any accuracy requirements. Any accuracy requirements should be inserted here.
2.5.1.5 Determine ESS Type M Yes  
2.5.1.5.a Permanent 0.2 (1) Yes / No  
2 5.1.5.b Transportable 0.2 (1) Yes / No  
2.5.1.5.c (Mobile) Mobile 0.2 (1) Yes / No  
    13.5.1.1.1 Retrieve ESS Characteristics M Yes  
2.5.1.6 Monitor the Status of Itie ESS 0 Yes / No  
    3.5.1 2.4 Retrieve ESS Status M Yes / NA  
2.5.2 Sensor Manager Features 0.3 (1.*) Yes / No  

The text "Agency prepares a customized project PRL by selecting YES" points to the 7th row of Support.

)

 

Slide 67:

Benefits of PRL to Stakeholders

Agency Perspective (Project PRL)

Did they build RIGHT system?

Checklist icon used to indicate a process that is being laid out sequentially.

 

Slide 68:

Benefits of PRL to Stakeholders

Vendors/System Developers Perspective

Tools/Applications icon. An industry-specific item a person would use to accomplish a specific task, and applying that tool to fit your need.

 

Slide 69:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 70:

Question

Which of the following is NOT a correct approach to preparing the project PRL?

Answer Choices

  1. Select YES Architectural needs.
  2. Select Mandatory ESS Manager features ONLY.
  3. Select YES project-specific features.
  4. Let the vendor select ESS features.

 

Slide 71:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Select YES Architectural needs.
Incorrect. The statement is correct, we must select architectural need to communicate to ESS manager.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Select Mandatory ESS Manager features ONLY.
Incorrect. The statement is correct, we must select Mandatory ESS manager features for conformity to the standard.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Select YES project-specific features.
Incorrect. PRL must select YES optional user need if project requires it to meet operational need. For example, wind speed.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Let the vendor select ESS features.
Correct! The statement is FALSE, the entire purpose of having a PRL in a specification is to "communicate" what an agency desires. A vendor can respond to the PRL.

 

Slide 72:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 73:

Learning Objective 4

 

Slide 74:

Steps to Select User Needs and Associated Requirements

Brief Review

 

Slide 75:

How PRL Fits into the ESS Specification

Procurement Contract Specification. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Procurement Contract Specifications - An arrow points to a text box on upper right side. Procurement Contract Specifications text:

1 - Hardware Specifications

Functional Req.
Performance Req.
Structural Req.
Mechanical Req.
Electrical Req.
Environmental Req.

2 - Software Specifications

Functional Req.
Performance Req.

Contractual requirements during:

3 - Communications Interface Specifications

User Needs
Functional Req.
Project PRL, RTM
Testing Documentation

)

Remember icon. Used when referencing something already discussed in the module that is necessary to recount.

 

Slide 76:

Complete Project PRL with Entries (Populating Table)

Key Points to Remember While Completing a Project PRL

  1. PRL must be consistent with the hardware specification
  2. ESS specification should have project level PRL
  3. PRL must be based on the NTCIP 1204 v04 with SNMP interface
  4. Include only need-based specific ESS parameters-NOTAII YOU Can GET

Remember icon. Used when referencing something already discussed in the module that is necessary to recount.

 

Slide 77:

Complete Project PRL with Entries (Populating Table)

Conformance and Compliance Issues

 

Slide 78:

Complete Project PRL with Entries (Populating Table)

Fill-in PRL with User Needs/Requirements; YES

A PRL table with box highlighting Support column is shown. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: A PRL table with box highlighting Support column is shown:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2 5.2.1.2 Monitor Winds 0.5(1..*) Yes / No/NA  
    3.5 2.1.2 (Wind) Retrieve Metadata for Each Wind Sensor - Text Description 0 Yes/No/NA  
    3.5.2.1.11.1 (WindLoc) Retrieve Metadata for Each Wind Sensor - Location 0 Yes / No/NA  
    3.5.2.1.11.2 Retrieve Metadata for Each Wind Sensor - Sensor Information 0 Yes/No/NA  
    3.5.2.1.11.3 Configure Wind Sensor Metadata - Location Wind:0; WindLoc:0 Yes/No/NA  
    3.5.2.3.2.2 Retrieve Wind Data M Yes / NA  
    3.6.2 Required Number of Wind Sensors M Yes / NA The ESS shall support at least ____ (1..255:Default=1) wind sensors.

)

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 79:

Complete Project PRL with Entries (Populating Table)

Addressing Mandatory Needs for Conformity

Example PRL table. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Example PRL table - Conformance column has a box around M in conformance column at top rows and selected YES in Support column. One more user need is shown at end. Selected YES For a project points to Yes in Support column. Additionally, YES for Permanent (NO for Mobile, NO for Transportable) points to Support column 2.5.1.5 section. The table is as follows:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.4 Architectural Needs M Yes  
2.4.1 Generic Architectural Needs M Yes  
2.5 Features   Yes  
2.5.1 ESS Manager Features M Yes  
2.5.1.1 Generic Features M Yes  
2512 Monitor Door Status 0 Yes /No  
    35.12.1 Retrieve ESS Door Status M Yes / NA  
2.5.1.3 Monitor Power Q Yes/No  
3.5 1.2.2 Retrieve Battery Status 0.1 (1.*) Yes/No/NA  
3.5.1.2.3 Retrieve Line Volts 0.1 (1.*) Yes/No/NA  
2.5.1.4 Monitor Mobile Station Data Mobile:M Yes / NA  
    3.5.1.3.1 Retrieve Mobile ESS Movement M Yes / NA NTCIP 1204 v04 does not impose any accuracy requirements. Any accuracy requirements should be inserted here.
2.5.1.5 Determine ESS Type M Yes  
2.5.1.5.a Permanent 0.2(1) Yes / No  
2.5.1.5.b Transportable 0.2(1) Yes/No  
2.5.1.5.c (Mobile) Mobile 0.2(1) Yes/No  
    3.5.1.1.1 Retrieve ESS Characteristics M Yes  
2.5.1.6 Monitor the Status of the ESS 0 Yes/No  
    3.5 1.2.4 Retrieve ESS Status M Yes / NA  
2.5.2 Sensor Manager Features 0.3 (1..*) Yes / No  

)

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 80:

Complete Project PRL with Entries (Populating Table)

Addressing Generic Architectural (Communications) Needs

Example PRL table. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description: Same kind of example as above with items in Conformance and Support highlighted in this table:.

User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
F.1.1 Generic Architectural Needs      
F.1.1.1 Provide Live Data M Yes  
    F.2.1.1.1 Retrieve Data M Yes  
    F 2.1.1.2 Deliver Data M Yes  
    F 2.1.1.3 Explore Data M Yes  
    3.6.21 Maximum Response Time for Requests M Yes The Response Time for all requests shall be milliseconds (25-500: Defaults 00)
F.1.1.2 (Compressed) Provide Compressed Data Mobile:M; 0 Yes / No  
    3.6.21 Maximum Response Time for Requests M Yes The Response Time for all requests shall be milliseconds (25-500: Defaults 00)
F.1.1.3 Provide Off-line Log Data 0 Yes / No  
    F.2.1.2.1 Retrieve Current Configuration of Logging Service M Yes / NA  
    F.2.1.2.2 Configure Logging Service M Yes / NA  
    F.2 1 2.3 Retrieve Logged Data M Yes / NA  
    F.2 1 2.4 Clear Log M Yes / NA  
    F.2.1.2.5 Retrieve Capabilities of Event Logging Service M Yes / NA  
    F.2.1.2.6 Retrieve Total Number of Logged Events M Yes / NA  

)

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 81:

Backward Compatibility

NTCIP 1204 v04 Compatibility to Earlier Versions

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 82:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 83:

Question

Which of the following is a False Statement related to a ESS specification?

Answer Choices

  1. ESS specification includes a PRL.
  2. Conformance requires only meeting mandatory user needs.
  3. Compliance requires only mandatory user needs.
  4. Vendor must use the project PRL.

 

Slide 84:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Agency specification includes a PRL.
Incorrect. The statement is true, PRL must be in every ESS specification.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Conformance requires only mandatory user needs.
Incorrect. Statement is true, only Mandatory user needs must be met to conform to the ESS standard.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Compliance requires only meeting mandatory user needs.
Correct! False statement: Vendor must meet mandatory and selected optional user needs for compliance to specification.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Vendor must use the project PRL.
Incorrect. The statement is true-vendor must use agency PRL.

 

Slide 85:

Module Summary

 

Slide 86:

We Have Now Completed A313a in the ESS Curriculum

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module A313a: Understanding User Needs for ESS Systems Based on
NTCIP 1204 v04 Standard

SpacerModule A313b: Specifying Requirements for
NTCIP 1204 v04 ESS Standard

SpacerModule T313: Applying Your Test Plan to the Environmental Sensor Stations based on the
NTCIP 1204 ESS Standard v04

 

Slide 87:

Next Course Module

Module A313b: Specifying Requirements for NTCIP 1204 v04 ESS Standard

Concepts taught in next module (Learning Objectives):

  1. Review the structure of the standard
  2. Use the PRL and RTM to specify the standardized structure of requirements
  3. Use the RTM to specify the standardized design
  4. How to specify requirements not covered by the standard
  5. Infer the relationship between selecting requirements and testing

 

Slide 88:

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