Module 23 - A312b

A312b: Specifying Requirements for Transportation Sensor Systems (TSS) Based on NTCIP 1209 Standard

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(Note: This document has been converted from a PowerPoint presentation to 508-compliant HTML. The formatting has been adjusted for 508 compliance, but all the original text content is included, plus additional text descriptions for the images, photos and/or diagrams have been provided below.)

 

Slide 1:

Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Slide 1: Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. A large dark blue rectangle with a wide, light grid pattern at the top half and bands of dark and lighter blue bands below. There is a white square ITS logo box with words “Standards ITS Training” in green and blue on the middle left side. The word “Welcome” in white is to the right of the logo. Under the logo box are the words “RITA Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office.”)

 

Slide 2:

Welcome

Head shot photo of Ken Leonard, Director - ITS Joint Program Office

Ken Leonard, Director

ITS Joint Program Office

Ken.Leonard@dot.gov

Screen capture snapshot of RITA website - for illustration only - see the extended text description below.

(Extended Text Description: Intro Slide: Screen capture snapshot of RITA website - for illustration only. Below this image is a link to the current website: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov - this screen capture snapshot shows an example from the RITA website from April 2013. At the top of the page it shows the RITA logo with the text U.S. Department of Transportation Research and Innovative Technology Administration - Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office - ITS Professional Capacity Building Program/Advanced ITS Education. Below the main site banner, it shows the main navigation menu with the following items: About, ITS Training, Knowledge Exchange, Technology Transfer, ITS in Academics, and Media Library. Below the main navigation menu, the page shows various content of the website, including a graphic image of professionals seated in a room during a training program. A text overlay has the text Welcome to ITS Professional Capacity Building. Additional content on the page includes a box entitled What's New and sections entitled Available E-Training (free), Free ITS Training and T3 Webinars. Again, this image serves for illustration only. The current website link is: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov)

www.pcb.its.dot.gov

(Note: There is additional text attached to this slide that includes the following introductory information from Ken Leonard):

"ITS Standards can make your life easier. Your procurements will go more smoothly and you’ll encourage competition, but only if you know how to write them into your specifications and test them. This module is one in a series that covers practical applications for acquiring and testing standards-based ITS systems.

I am Ken Leonard, director of the ITS Joint Program Office for USDOT and I want to welcome you to our newly redesigned ITS standards training program of which this module is a part. We are pleased to be working with our partner, the Institute of Transportation Engineers, to deliver this new approach to training that combines web based modules with instructor interaction to bring the latest in ITS learning to busy professionals like yourself.

This combined approach allows interested professionals to schedule training at your convenience, without the need to travel. After you complete this training, we hope that you will tell colleagues and customers about the latest ITS standards and encourage them to take advantage of the archived version of the webinars.

ITS Standards training is one of the first offerings of our updated Professional Capacity Training Program. Through the PCB program we prepare professionals to adopt proven and emerging ITS technologies that will make surface transportation safer, smarter and greener which improves livability for us all. You can find information on additional modules and training programs on our web site www.pcb.its.dot.gov

Please help us make even more improvements to our training modules through the evaluation process. We look forward to hearing your comments. Thank you again for participating and we hope you find this module helpful."

 

Slide 3:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 4:

A312b:

Specifying Requirements for Transportation Sensor Systems (TSS) Based on NTCIP 1209 Standard

 

Slide 5:

Instructor

Portrait image of Ralph W. Boaz, President, Pillar Consulting, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA. 

Ralph W. Boaz

President

Pillar Consulting, Inc. San Diego, CA, USA

 

Slide 6:

Target Audience

 

Slide 7:

Recommended Prerequisite(s)

 

Slide 8:

Curriculum Path (SEP)

Curriculum Path (SEP). Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules that lead up to this course. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and an arrow showing the logical flow of the modules and the preceding module and current module highlighted. There are 8 boxes in total; two rows of 3 boxes and a row of 2 boxes. The first box is labeled “I101 Using ITS Standards: An Overview.” An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled “A101 Introduction to Acquiring Standards-based ITS Systems.” An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled “A102 Introduction to User Needs Identification.” An arrow from this box connects it to a box located at the start of the next row labeled “A201 Details on Acquiring Standards-based ITS Systems.” An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled “C101 Intro. To Comm. Protocols and Their Use in ITS Applications.” An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled “C201 Introduction to the SNMP and its Applications in the NTCIP Standards.” An arrow from this box connects it to a box located at the start of the next row labeled “A312a Understanding User Needs for Transportation Sensor System Based on NTCIP 1209 Standard.”  It is highlighted indicating that it is the direct predecessor to the current course.  An arrow from this box connects to a box labeled “A312b Specifying Requirements for Transportation Sensor Systems (TSS) Based on NTCIP 1209 Standard.”  It is highlighted indicating that it is the current course.)

 

Slide 9:

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe requirements included in the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard
  2. Use the Protocol Requirements List (PRL) to specify an NTCIP TSS interface
  3. Achieve interoperability and interchangeability using the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
  4. Incorporate requirements not covered by the standard
  5. Explain the NTCIP 1209 v02 SNMP interface and dialogs

 

Slide 10:

Learning Objective #1 - Describe requirements included in the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard

 

Slide 11:

Learning Objective #1

Definition of a TSS within NTCIP 1209

A Transportation Sensor System (TSS) is defined as any system or device capable of sensing and communicating near real-time traffic parameters using NTCIP.

 

Slide 12:

Learning Objective #1

NTCIP 1209 Detection Architecture

NTCIP 1209 Detection Architecture. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “NTCIP 1209 Detection Architecture,” contains a graphic illustrating the detection architecture defined by the NTCIP 1209 Standard.  The slide is composed of four graphic images.  There is a computer terminal located in the middle left area of the slide.  The computer terminal has a label above the graphic with the words “Management Station.”  To the right of the computer terminal are three graphic images arranged vertically down the center of the slide.  The top most graphic is one of a traffic controller connected to detectors as described in Slide 44. There is a label above this graphic with the words “Traffic Controllers.”  The graphic beneath the traffic controller is a video detection camera which is shown as a cylindrical device with a camera lens at one end.   The camera has a label above the graphic with the word “Video.”  The graphic beneath the video detection camera is a rectangle containing the words “Radar, Magnetometer, Acoustic, Etc.” The rectangle has a label above the graphic with the words “Other Technologies.”  There are solid lines connecting the computer terminal to the other three graphics.  There is a legend at the bottom left of the slide indicating that the solid lines identify “NTCIP TSS Communications.”)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 13:

Learning Objective #1

History of NTCIP 1209

 

Slide 14:

Learning Objective #1

Structure of the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard

  1. General
  2. TSS Concept of Operations
  3. TSS Functional Requirements (includes Protocol Requirements List)
  4. TSS Dialogs
  5. Management Information Base (MIB)

 

Slide 15:

Learning Objective #1

Structure of the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

Annex A Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)

Annex B Object Tree

Annex C Test Procedures (placeholder for the future)

Annex D Document Revisions

 

Slide 16:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 17:

Learning Objective #1

What tool is used to show the relationship between requirements and dialogs within the standard?

Answer Choices

  1. Object Tree
  2. Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
  3. Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
  4. Dialogs

 

Slide 18:

Learning Objective #1

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Object Tree
Incorrect. The Object Tree shows the hierarchical organization of the objects in the MIB.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
Incorrect. The PRL shows the relationship of user needs to requirements.

 

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
Correct. The RTM shows requirements traced to the interface items (dialogs and objects).

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Dialogs
Incorrect. Dialogs show the exchange of messages.

 

Slide 19:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

 

Slide 20:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “User Need Section Number.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 21:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “User Need.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 22:

Learning Objective #1

User Need - Configure Outputs

2.5.1.7 Configure Outputs

This feature allows the management station to configure the outputs to report the state of zones (e.g., assigning an output to a zone, conditioning of outputs to include delay and extension, assigning fail-safe/fail-secure mode of operation, force output on/off).

 

Slide 23:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “FR Section Number.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 24:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Functional Requirement.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 25:

Learning Objective #1

Requirements for User Need Configure Outputs

3.4.1.6.1 Get Output Sensor Zone

The TSS shall allow a management station to determine the sensor zone assigned to an output.

3.4.1.6.2 Get Output Failsafe Mode

The TSS shall allow a management station to determine the last fail-safe mode command.

 

Slide 26:

Learning Objective #1

Requirements for User Need Configure Outputs

3.4.1.6.3 Get Output Mode Status

The TSS shall allow a management station to determine the current output mode status of an output.

3.4.1.6.4 Get Output Label

The TSS shall allow a management station to determine the label assigned to an output.

 

Slide 27:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Conformance.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 28:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Support/Project Requirement.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 29:

Learning Objective #1

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements

Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Use the PRL to Trace User Needs to Requirements,” contains the PRL table from Slide 19 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Protocol Requirements List.  There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Additional Specifications.”

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.7

Configure Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.1

Get Output Sensor Zone

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.2

Get Output Failsafe Mode

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.3

Get Output Mode Status

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.6.4

Get Output Label

O

Yes / No

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 30:

Learning Objective #1

Organization of Requirements

3.4.1 Manage the TSS Configuration

3.4.2 Monitor the Current Status

3.4.3 Collection of Sample Data 3.5 Multi-Version Interoperability

 

Slide 31:

Learning Objective #1

TSS Requirements Are "Well-Formed"

[Actor] [Action] [Target] [Constraint] [Localization]

Actor Identifies who or what that does the action

Action Identifies what is to happen

Target Identifies who or what receives the action

Constraint Identifies how to measure success or failure of the requirement

Localization Identifies the circumstances under which the requirement applies

Localization and constraint portions are important but not all requirements will have both

 

Slide 32:

Learning Objective #1

Example TSS Requirement

[Actor] [Action] [Target] [Constraint] [Localization]

Example TSS Requirement. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Example TSS Requirement,” provides an example TSS requirement.  As the instructor speaks, four ovals appear encompassing various parts of the requirement that are part of the structure of a well formed requirement.  The ovals are identified by uppercase text using arrows.  “The TSS” is encompassed and pointed to by “ACTOR.”  “to determine” is encompassed and pointed to by “ACTION.”  “the label” is encompassed and pointed to by “TARGET.”  “assigned to an output” is encompassed and pointed to by “LOCALIZATION.”)

 

Slide 33:

Learning Objective #1

3.4.1 Manage the TSS Configuration

3.4.1.1 Identify the TSS (7 reqs)

3.4.1.2 Determine the TSS Capabilities (10 reqs)

3.4.1.3 Control the TSS (14 reqs)

3.4.1.4 Manage Real-Time Clock (RTC) (4 reqs)

3.4.1.5 Manage Sensor Zones (57 reqs)

3.4.1.6 Manage Outputs (11 reqs)

3.4.1.7 Manage Camera (19 reqs)

 

Slide 34:

Learning Objective #1

3.4.2 Monitor the Current Status of the TSS

3.4.2.1 Get System Status (1 req)

3.4.2.2 TSS Sensor Status (11 reqs)

3.4.2.3 Monitor Output States (1 req)

 

Slide 35:

Learning Objective #1

3.4.3 Collection of Sample Data

3.4.3.1 Retrieve Historical Sample Data from the TSS (6 reqs)

3.4.3.2 Get Zone Class Label (1 req)

3.4.3.3 Get Number of Sample Data Entries (1 req)

3.4.3.4 Get Number of Sensor Zone Classes (1 req)

 

Slide 36:

Learning Objective #1

3.5 Multi-Version Interoperability (MVI -Backward Compatibility)

3.5.1 Retrieve Most Recent NTCIP 1209:2005 (v01) Conformant Data Sample Table (5 reqs)

3.5.2 Retrieve NTCIP 1209:2005 (v01) Conformant Historical Sample Data Table (5 reqs)

3.5.3 Loop Output Conditioning Table (12 reqs)

 

Slide 37:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 38:

Learning Objective #1

Which of the following is not a major group of requirements in NTCIP 1209 v02?

Answer Choices

  1. Manage the TSS configuration
  2. Manage the camera
  3. Collect sample data
  4. Multi-version interoperability (backward compatibility)

 

Slide 39:

Learning Objective #1

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Manage the TSS configuration
Incorrect. This major group of requirements covers Configuration and Control requirements of the TSS.

 

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) Manage the camera
Correct. Manage the camera is included in manage the TSS configuration so it is not its own major group. Monitor the TSS is the remaining major group.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Collect sample data
Incorrect. This major group of requirements refers to the collection of near real-time data.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Multi-version interoperability (backward compatibility)
Incorrect. This major group of requirements refers to the design of the standard in version NTCIP 1209 v01.

 

Slide 40:

Summary of Learning Objective #1

Describe requirements included in the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard

 

Slide 41:

Learning Objective #2 - Use the Protocol Requirements List (PRL) to specify an NTCIP TSS interface

 

Slide 42:

Learning Objective #2

Specifying Performance Criteria for Functional Requirements

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.4.1

Retrieve In-Progress Sample Data

Sample:M Speed:M

Yes / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.3.1.1

Get Historical Sample End Time

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.3.1.2

Get Historical Sample Volume

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.3.1.3

Get Historical Sample Percent Occupancy

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

 

Slide 43:

Learning Objective #2

Specifying Performance Criteria for Functional Requirements

Specifying Performance Criteria for Functional Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Specifying Performance Criteria for Functional Requirements,” contains a PRL table with all of the “Yes” options in the Support/Project Requirement column encompassed by ovals:

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.4.1

Retrieve In-Progress Sample Data

Sample:M Speed:M

Yes / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.3.1.1

Get Historical Sample End Time

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

Message shall be sent once per second.

 

 

3.4.3.1.2

Get Historical Sample Volume

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

Message shall be sent once per second.

 

 

3.4.3.1.3

Get Historical Sample Percent Occupancy

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

Message shall be sent once per second.

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 44:

Learning Objective #2

Specifying Limits or Ranges on Requirements

Specifying Limits or Ranges on Requirements. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Specifying Limits or Ranges on Requirements,” contains a PRL table with all of the “Yes” options in the Support/Project Requirement column encompassed by ovals:

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.1.2

Determine TSS Capabilities

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.2.1

Determine Maximum Number of Sensor Zones

M

Yes

 

 

 

3.4.1.2.2

Determine Maximum Number of Historical Data Entries per Sensor Zones

Sample:M

Yes / N/A

Max number of Historical Data Entries shall be 4.

 

 

3.4.1.2.3

Determine Maximum Number of Outputs

M

Yes

 

 

 

...

...

...

...

 

)

 

Slide 45:

Learning Objective #2

Using Optional Requirements and Predicates

Using Optional Requirements and Predicates. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using Optional Requirements and Predicates,” contains a PRL table with one of the “Yes / No / N/A” options in the Support/Project Requirement column encompassed by ovals as follows: Row 1 – “Yes” Row 2 – “No” Row 3 – “No” Row 4 – “Yes” Row 5 – “Yes”:

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

2.5.2.5

Manage the Camera

Video:M

Yes / N/A

Video Predicate is Specified

 

 

3.4.1.7.1

Set Disable Detection

Video: O

Yes / No / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.1.7.2

Get Disable Detection

Video: O

Yes / No / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.1.7.3

Set the Build Image Parameter

Video: O.2

Yes / No / N/A

 

 

 

3.4.1.7.4

Set Cancel Build In-Progress

Video: O.2

Yes / No / N/A

 

)

 

Slide 46:

Learning Objective #2

Using the PRL in a Specification

 

Slide 47:

Learning Objective #2

Review of the Predicates Used in NTCIP 1209 v02

 

Slide 48:

Learning Objective #2

Review of Conformance Status Used in NTCIP 1209 v02

Symbol

Conformance Status

M

Mandatory

O

Optional

O.#

Part of an "Option Group" where "#" indicates the group number (e.g., "O.2" means Option Group 2). If a requirement associated with a particular Option Group is to be supported, then all requirements in the standard that are associated with that Option Group must also be supported.

N/A

Not applicable (i.e., logically impossible in the scope of the standard)

 

Slide 49:

Learning Objective #2

Process for Using the PRL in NTCIP 1209 v02

  1. Make a copy of the PRL table
  2. Determine which predicates apply to your specification of the NTCIP 1209 v02
  3. Step through each User Need in the PRL and indicate whether it is to be included
    1. Circle Yes for all User Needs indicated by an M
    2. Circle Yes or No for all User Needs indicated by an O

 

Slide 50:

Learning Objective #2

Process for Using the PRL in NTCIP 1209 v02 (cont.)

  1. Step through each User Need in the PRL and indicate whether it is to be included (cont.)
    1. Circle Yes to all User Needs indicated by <Predicate>:M for the predicates determined in Step #2
    2. Circle Yes or No for all User Needs indicated by a <Predicate>:O and <Predicate>:O#
    3. Verify that all User Needs with a like <Predicate>:O# have a Yes circled
    4. Circle No or N/A as appropriate for all remaining User Needs

 

Slide 51:

Learning Objective #2

Process for Using the PRL in NTCIP 1209 v02 (cont.)

  1. Step through each Requirement for each User Need in the PRL that has a circled Yes
    1. Circle Yes for all Requirements indicated by an M
    2. Circle Yes or No for all Requirements indicated by an O
    3. Circle Yes to all Requirements indicated by <Predicate>:M for the predicates determined in Step #2
    4. Circle Yes or No for all Requirements indicated by a <Predicate>:O and <Predicate>:O#
    5. Verify that all Requirements with a like <Predicate>:O# have a Yes circled

 

Slide 52:

Learning Objective #2

Process for Using the PRL in NTCIP 1209 v02 (cont.)

  1. Step through each Requirement for each User Need in the PRL that has a circled Yes (cont.)
    1. Circle No or N/A as appropriate for all remaining Requirements
  2. Enter any limits or ranges to be applied to any of the included requirements in the PRL
  3. Enter any performance criteria for any of the included requirements in the PRL
  4. Enter any other special instructions for any requirement in the PRL

 

Slide 53:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 54:

Learning Objective #2

If Video:O.2 is used in the conformance column of the TSS PRL, what does it mean?

Answer Choices

  1. It's the second of 20 optional Video requirements in the standard
  2. It identifies the second highest priority optional Video requirement
  3. Says that if one Video:O.2 optional requirement is used in the project, all Video:O.2 requirements must be used
  4. None of the above

 

Slide 55:

Learning Objective #2

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) It's the second of 20 optional Video requirements in the standard
Incorrect. There is no numbering of requirements in the conformance column of the PRL.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) It identifies the second highest priority optional Video requirement
Incorrect. There is no priority of requirements indicated in the conformance column of the PRL.

 

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Says that if one Video:O.2 optional requirement is used in the project, all Video:O.2 requirements must be used
Correct This is the method used to identify an option group.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) None of the above
Incorrect. There is a correct answer listed above.

 

Slide 56:

Summary of Learning Objective #2

Use the Protocol Requirements List (PRL) to specify an NTCIP TSS interface

 

Slide 57:

Learning Objective #3 - Achieve interoperability and interchangeability using the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)

 

Slide 58:

Learning Objective #3

How the RTM traces to a single design

 

Slide 59:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

 

Slide 60:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix,” contains the RTM table from Slide 59 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Requirements Traceability Matrix. There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Requirement ID.”

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

)

 

Slide 61:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix,” contains the RTM table from Slide 59 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Requirements Traceability Matrix. There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Requirement.”

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

)

 

Slide 62:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix,” contains the RTM table from Slide 59 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Requirements Traceability Matrix. There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Dialog ID.”

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

)

 

Slide 63:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix,” contains the RTM table from Slide 59 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Requirements Traceability Matrix. There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Dialog.”

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

)

 

Slide 64:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix,” contains the RTM table from Slide 59 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Requirements Traceability Matrix. There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Object ID.”

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

)

 

Slide 65:

Learning Objective #3

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix

Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “Using the Requirements Traceability Matrix,” contains the RTM table from Slide 59 (repeated below) and is used to highlight the composition of the Requirements Traceability Matrix. There is a rounded rectangle surrounding the column “Object.”

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

3.4.3.1.7

Get Zone Class Label

 

 

4.3.3.5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels

 

 

 

 

5.2.4

maxSensorZones

 

 

 

 

5.2.10

functionalCapabilities

 

 

 

 

5.4.5.1

zoneClassLabel

)

 

Slide 66:

Learning Objective #3

How to determine that a management station and device will be interoperable

Interoperability

 

Slide 67:

Learning Objective #3

How to determine that a management station and device will be interoperable

Can the management station and field device fulfill each requirement in a cooperative way?

 

Slide 68:

Learning Objective #3

How to determine that two devices will be interchangeable

Interchangeability

 

Slide 69:

Learning Objective #3

How to determine that two devices will be interchangeable

Is it close enough for you?

 

Slide 70:

Learning Objective #3

Off-the-Shelf Interoperability and Interchangeability

 

Slide 71:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 72:

Learning Objective #3

Which statement is TRUE in regards to achieving interchangeability for TSS equipment using NTCIP 1209 v02?

Answer Choices

  1. Using user needs from the standard guarantees interchangeability
  2. Using only requirements, data elements and dialogs from the standard guarantees interchangeability
  3. Adding communications data elements that are not in the standard makes interchangeability impossible
  4. Using only requirements, data elements and dialogs from the standard makes interchangeability a possibility

 

Slide 73:

Learning Objective #3

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Using user needs from the standard guarantees interchangeability
Incorrect. User needs (features) identified in the standard are at a high level that, by themselves, are not explicit enough for interchangeability.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Using only requirements, data elements, and dialogs from the standard guarantees interchangeability
Incorrect. Interchangeability may be affected by other aspects of the TSS device - not just communications.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Adding communications data elements that are not in the standard makes interchangeability impossible
Incorrect. Using data elements not in the standard may limit choices of manufacturers willing or able to provide support for those data elements but interchangeability is not impossible technically.

 

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Using only requirements, data elements and dialogs from the standard makes interchangeability a possibility
Correct. Using only the standardized interface items provides the best opportunity for interchangeability.

 

Slide 74:

Learning Objective #3

Which statement is TRUE in regards to the RTM in NTCIP 1209 v02?

Answer Choices

  1. Shows relationship of requirements to the specific design items of the TSS interface
  2. Shows relationship of user needs to the specific design items of the TSS interface
  3. Should always be included in an agency specification
  4. Not used until integration of the system and the TSS device

 

Slide 75:

Learning Objective #3

Review of answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Shows relationship of requirements to the specific design items of the TSS interface
Correct. The design items include the data objects and dialogs.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Shows relationship of user needs to the specific design items of the TSS interface
Incorrect. User needs are found in the Protocol Requirements List.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Should always be included in an agency specification
Incorrect. RTM information is only needed in an agency specification if there is something different from the standard.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Not used until integration of the system and the TSS device
Incorrect. The RTM is used by system software and TSS manufacturers implementing the standard.

 

Slide 76:

Summary of Learning Objective #3

Achieve interoperability and interchangeability using the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)

 

Slide 77:

Learning Objective #4 - Incorporate requirements not covered by the standard

 

Slide 78:

Learning Objective #4

Conditions and context for extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard

 

Slide 79:

Learning Objective #4

Conditions and context for extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

 

Slide 80:

Learning Objective #4

Sensor Technologies That May Have Technology-Specific Features

* - Technology-specific features included in NTCIP 1209 v02

 

Slide 81:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard

85th Percentile Speed

A speed at or below which 85 percent of people drive at any given location under good weather and visibility conditions may be considered as the maximum safe speed for that location.

Scenario:

We are an agency that wishes to include 85th Pecentile Speed in our TSS Specification

 

Slide 82:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

Assume our specification is arranged as follows -

 

Slide 83:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

Need / Feature

6.2.1 85th Percentile Speed

This feature allows the management station to obtain the 85th percentile speed from the TSS.

 

Slide 84:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

Requirements

6.3.1 Get 85th Percentile Speed

The TSS shall allow a management station to retrieve the 85th percentile speed for each zone.

6.3.2 Reset 85th Percentile Speed

The TSS shall allow a management station to reset the 85th percentile speed.

 

Slide 85:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

PRL

User Need Section Number

User Need

FR Section Number

Functional Requirement

Conformance

Support / Project Requirement

Additional Specifications

6.2.1

85th Percentile Speed

M

Yes

 

 

 

6.3.1

Get 85th Percentile Speed

M

Yes

 

 

 

6.3.2

Reset 85th Percentile Speed

M

Yes

 

 

Slide 86:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

RTM

Requirement ID

Requirement

Dialog ID

Dialog

Object ID

Object

6.3.1

Get 85th Percentile Speed

 

 

6.4.1

Retrieve 85th Percentile Speed

 

 

 

 

6.5.1

zoneEightyFifthPCTLSpeed

6.3.2

Reset 85th Percentile Speed

 

 

6.4.2

Initialize 85th Percentile Speed

 

 

 

 

6.5.2

resetZoneEightyFifthPCTLSpeed

 

Slide 87:

Learning Objective #4

Example of Extending the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard (cont.)

zoneEightyFifthPCTLSpeed OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER (1..2550)
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"<Definition> Indicates the 85th percentile speed for a zone.
<Unit> tenths of km/h
<Object Identifier> 1.3.6.1.4.1.1206.4.2.4.3.6.1.1"
::= { zoneSpeedDataEntry 1 }

 

Slide 88:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 89:

Learning Objective #4

Which of the following is justification for extending the standard with a new feature?

Answer Choices

  1. When you are not worried about interoperability or interchangeability
  2. After you have weighed the risk of making interoperability and interchangeability more difficult against the benefit of the feature
  3. When you want to disqualify a second vendor because you have done business with another in the past
  4. When a proprietary method to accomplish a feature is more familiar over the method used in the standard

 

Slide 90:

Learning Objective #4

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) When you are not worried about interoperability or interchangeability
Incorrect. If not concerned with interoperability or interchangeability, why use NTCIP at all?

 

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) After you have weighed the risk of making interoperability and interchangeability more difficult against the benefit of the feature
Correct. It should be a significant enhancement.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) When you want to disqualify a second vendor because you have done business with another in the past
Incorrect. You may find yourself trapped into one vendor in the future even if they perform poorly.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) When a proprietary method to accomplish a feature is more familiar over the method used in the standard
Incorrect. If there is a standard method to accomplish the same feature, it is best to use it.

 

Slide 91:

Summary of Learning Objective #4

Incorporate Requirements Not Covered by the Standard

 

Slide 92:

Learning Objective #5 - Explain the TSS SNMP Interface and Dialogs

 

Slide 93:

Learning Objective #5

A Standard SNMP Get Dialog

A Standard SNMP Get Dialog. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled “A Standard SNMP Get Dialog,” contains a graphic form of a dialog referred to as a sequence diagram. Items in the diagram are arranged on two vertical axes parallel to each other. On the left, from top to bottom, there is a stick man, a label saying “:Management Station,” and a slender (much taller than wide) rectangle extending down the left axis. On the right, from top to bottom, there is a box labeled “:TSS” and a slender (much taller than wide) rectangle extending down the right axis. At the top of the two slender rectangles there is a thin horizontal arrow extending from the left rectangle to the right rectangle. The arrow is labeled “Get(varBindingList).” Approximately, half the distance of the height of the rectangles, there is a thin horizontal arrow extending from the right rectangle to the left rectangle. It is labeled “GetResponse(varBindingList).”)

 

Slide 94:

Learning Objective #5

Example From NTCIP 1209 v02 -Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels Dialog

 

Slide 95:

Learning Objective #5

Example Data Structures

zoneSequenceTableEntry

Zone Index

# of Sample Data Entries

# of Classes

1

4

3

2

4

3

3

4

3

n

. . .

. . .

 

Slide 96:

Learning Objective #5

Example Data Structures (cont.)

zoneClassTableEntry

Zone Index

Class Index

Class Label

1

1

Motorcycle

 

2

Sedan

 

3

Truck

2

1

Motorcycle

 

2

Sedan

 

3

Truck

. . .

. . .

...

 

Slide 97:

Learning Objective #5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels Dialog

Where: x = sensorZoneNumber; y = sampleZoneClass

  1. (Precondition) The management station shall determine that the sensorZoneNumber is less than or equal to the maxSensorZones. The TSS supports sampling features
  2. The management station shall GET zoneSequenceTableEntry:numSensorZoneClass.x
  3. sampleZoneClass = zoneSequenceTableEntry:numSensorZoneClass.x from Step b

 

Slide 98:

Learning Objective #5

Retrieve Sensor Zone Class Labels Dialog (cont.)

Where: x = sensorZoneNumber; y = sampleZoneClass

  1. The management station shall GET zoneClassLabel.y.x
  2. If zoneClassEntry is greater than 0, then zoneClassEntry = zoneClassEntry - 1 and go to Step d
  3. Retrieval of class labels for this sensor zone is complete

 

Slide 99:

Learning Objective #5

Retrieve 85th Percentile Speed Dialog

Where: x = sensorZoneNumber

  1. (Precondition) The management station shall determine that the sensorZoneNumber is less than or equal to the maxSensorZones.
  2. The management station shall GET zoneSpeedDataEntry:zoneEightyFifthPCTLSpeed.x
  3. Retrieval of 85th Percentile Speed for this sensorZoneNumber is complete

 

Slide 100:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 101:

Learning Objective #5

Which statement is TRUE concerning Dialogs used in defining a TSS interface?

Answer Choices

  1. A Dialog is best defined by graphical pictures
  2. A Dialog is not necessary when adding features outside of the standard
  3. A Dialog is only necessary if there are several exchanges of messages
  4. A Dialog is important to defining the exchange of messages to accomplish a requirement

 

Slide 102:

Learning Objective #5

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) A Dialog is best defined by graphical pictures
Incorrect. There are multiple ways to define a Dialog.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) A Dialog is not necessary when adding features outside of the standard
Incorrect. Requirements for features that are outside of the standard require dialogs also.

 

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) A Dialog is only necessary if there are several exchanges of messages
Incorrect. Every exchange of data has a dialog, even if it is only a standard SNMP SET, GET, or GET NEXT operation.

 

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) A Dialog is important to defining the exchange of messages to accomplish a requirement
Correct. This is critical for software developers to implement the interface.

 

Slide 103:

Summary of Learning Objective #5

Explain the TSS SNMP Interface and Dialogs

 

Slide 104:

What We Have Learned

  1. Describe requirements _ included in the NTCIP 1209 v02 Standard
  2. Use the Protocol Requirements List (PRL) to specify an NTCIP TSS interface
  3. Achieve interoperability and interchangeability using the Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM)
  4. Incorporate requirements not covered by the standard
  5. Explain the TSS SNMP interface and dialogs

 

Slide 105:

Resources

 

Slide 106:

Questions? A placeholder graphic image with word Questions? at the top, and an image of a lit light bulb on the lower right side.