Module 29 - A207b

A207b: Building an ITS Infrastructure Based on the Advanced Transportation Controller (ATC) 5201 Standard (Part 2 of 2)

HTML of the PowerPoint Presentation

(Note: This document has been converted from a PowerPoint presentation to 508-compliant HTML. The formatting has been adjusted for 508 compliance, but all the original text content is included, plus additional text descriptions for the images, photos and/or diagrams have been provided below.)

 

Slide 1:

Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Slide 1: Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. A large dark blue rectangle with a wide, light grid pattern at the top half and bands of dark and lighter blue bands below. There is a white square ITS logo box with words "Standards ITS Training" in green and blue on the middle left side. The word "Welcome" in white is to the right of the logo. Under the logo box are the words "RITA Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office.")

 

Slide 2:

Welcome

Head shot photo of Ken Leonard, Director - ITS Joint Program Office

Ken Leonard, Director

ITS Joint Program Office

Ken.Leonard@dot.gov

Screen capture snapshot of RITA website - for illustration only - see the extended text description below.

(Extended Text Description: Intro Slide: Screen capture snapshot of RITA website - for illustration only. Below this image is a link to the current website: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov - this screen capture snapshot shows an example from the RITA website from April 2013. At the top of the page it shows the RITA logo with the text U.S. Department of Transportation Research and Innovative Technology Administration - Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office - ITS Professional Capacity Building Program/Advanced ITS Education. Below the main site banner, it shows the main navigation menu with the following items: About, ITS Training, Knowledge Exchange, Technology Transfer, ITS in Academics, and Media Library. Below the main navigation menu, the page shows various content of the website, including a graphic image of professionals seated in a room during a training program. A text overlay has the text Welcome to ITS Professional Capacity Building. Additional content on the page includes a box entitled What's New and sections entitled Available E-Training (free), Free ITS Training and T3 Webinars. Again, this image serves for illustration only. The current website link is: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov)

www.pcb.its.dot.gov

(Note: There is additional text attached to this slide that includes the following introductory information from Ken Leonard):

"ITS Standards can make your life easier. Your procurements will go more smoothly and you'll encourage competition, but only if you know how to write them into your specifications and test them. This module is one in a series that covers practical applications for acquiring and testing standards-based ITS systems.

I am Ken Leonard, director of the ITS Joint Program Office for USDOT and I want to welcome you to our newly redesigned ITS standards training program of which this module is a part. We are pleased to be working with our partner, the Institute of Transportation Engineers, to deliver this new approach to training that combines web based modules with instructor interaction to bring the latest in ITS learning to busy professionals like yourself.

This combined approach allows interested professionals to schedule training at your convenience, without the need to travel. After you complete this training, we hope that you will tell colleagues and customers about the latest ITS standards and encourage them to take advantage of the archived version of the webinars.

ITS Standards training is one of the first offerings of our updated Professional Capacity Training Program. Through the PCB program we prepare professionals to adopt proven and emerging ITS technologies that will make surface transportation safer, smarter and greener which improves livability for us all. You can find information on additional modules and training programs on our web site www.pcb.its.dot.gov

Please help us make even more improvements to our training modules through the evaluation process. We look forward to hearing your comments. Thank you again for participating and we hope you find this module helpful."

 

Slide 3:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 4:

A207b:

Building an ITS Infrastructure Based on the Advanced Transportation Controller (ATC) 5201 Standard Part 2 of 2

 

Slide 5:

Instructor

Head shot photo of Ralph W. Boaz - President - Pillar Consulting, Inc. San Diego, CA, USA

Ralph W. Boaz

President

Pillar Consulting, Inc.

San Diego, CA, USA

 

Slide 6:

Target Audience

 

Slide 7:

Recommended Prerequisite(s)

 

Slide 8:

Recommended Prerequisite(s) (cont.)

 

Slide 9:

Curriculum Path (Non-SEP)

This slide contains a graphic illustration indicating the sequence of training modules that lead up to this course. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains a graphic illustration indicating the sequence of training modules that lead up to this course. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and arrows showing the logical flow of the modules. There are 7 boxes in total; two rows of 3 boxes and a row with 1 box. The first box is labeled "I101 Using ITS Standards: An Overview." An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled "A101 Introduction to Acquiring Standards-Based ITS Systems." An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled "A102 Introduction to User Needs Identification." An arrow from this box connects it to a box located at the start of the next row labeled "A201 Details on Acquiring Standards-based ITS Systems." An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled "A202 Identifying and Writing User Needs When ITS Standards Do Not Have SEP Content." An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled "A103 Introduction to ITS Standards Requirements Development." An arrow from this box connects it to a box located at the start of the next row labeled "A203 Writing Requirements When ITS Standards Do Not Have SEP Content." An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled "C101 Intro. To Comm. Protocols and Their Use in ITS Applications." An arrow from this box connects it to a box labeled "A207a Building an ITS Infrastructure Based on the ATC 5201 Standard Part 1 of 2." An arrow from this box connects it to a box located at the start of the next row labeled "A207b Building an ITS Infrastructure Based on the ATC 5201 Standard Part 2 of 2." The last two boxes are highlighted indicating that they represent the current modules in the series.)

 

Slide 10:

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain the purpose of the ATC Family of Standards
  2. Identify the basic components and operation of iransportation Field Cabinet Systems
  3. Identify the features of the ATC 5201 Standard
  4. Describe the ATC 5201 architecture
  5. Describe how the ATC 5201 Standard works with other ITS standards
  6. Specify ATC equipment for system and equipment procurements

 

Slide 11:

Learning Objective #3 - Identify the Features of the ATC 5201 Advanced Transportation Controller Standard

 

Slide 12:

Learning Objective #3

Problem with Traditional Transportation Controller Architectures

Problem with Traditional Controller Architectures. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Problem with Traditional Controller Architectures," contains an X/Y type of graph. The X axis is an arrow that begins at the bottom left of the slide and extends horizontally to the bottom right of the slide. The Y axis is an arrow that begins at the bottom left of the slide and extends upward to the upper left of the slide. Below the X axis are evenly distributed labels "1980," "1990," "2000," "2010" and "2020." To the left of the Y axis is the label "INCREASING CAPABILITY" which runs from the lower part of the Y axis towards the top of the Y axis. There is curving arrow that begins about 15% of the way up the Y axis extending to the right with a gradual slope upwards until it reaches the 2020 point of the X axis at about the 20% of the height of the Y axis. At the end of this curved arrow is a label "Traditional Capability Curve." There are three traffic signal heads on the curve at about the 1975, 1995 and 2005 points of the X axis.

There is a second curving arrow that begins about 15% of the way up the Y axis extending to the right with a radical slope upwards until it reaches nearly the 2020 point of the X axis at about the 100% of the height of the Y axis. At the end of this curved arrow is a label "Application Demand Curve." Along this curve are three rectangular graphics. The first two rectangles are larger than the third. The second rectangle slightly hides the upper right corner of the first rectangle. The third rectangle is about 20% of the size of the first two and is located towards the top right of the slide. The contents of these graphics are as follows:

At the middle right of the slide is a label "Technology Gap." It has lines from the label to the end of the first line and to the end of the second line.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 13:

Learning Objective #3

Transportation Controller Comparative Performance

Transportation Controller Comparative Performance. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Transportation Controller Comparative Performance," contains a bar graph. The vertical axis has values "0," "50," "100," "150," "200," "250," "300," "350," "400," "450" and "500." There are thin lines extending from the numerical points on the vertical axis across the chart. To the left of the numbers is a label "MIPS*." The horizontal axis has labels beneath it for three vertical bars as follows: "Model 170 (1982)," "Model 2070 (1998)" and "ATC v5/6 (2013) Minimum/Available." The vertical bar on the left is barely visible above the 0 point on the vertical axis. It has a label, "0.2 MIPS*," centered on top of the bar. The center bar can be seen slightly higher than the previous but still new the 0 point on the vertical axis. It has a label "4.5 MIPS*," centered on top of the bar. The bar to the right extends the entire height of the chart to the 500 point of the vertical axis. It has a label "500 MIPS*," centered on top of the bar. There is an additional label, "60 MIPS*," identifying a point on the right bar just above the 50 point of the vertical axis. There is text below the entire chart as follows: "* Millions of Instructions Per Second.")

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 14:

Learning Objective #3

Uses for ATC Controller Units Identified

 

Slide 15:

Learning Objective #3

Purpose of the ATC Family of Standards

 

Slide 16:

Learning Objective #3

Structure of the ATC 5201 Standard

Section 1 Introduction

Section 2 Overall Description

Section 3 Functional Requirements

Section 4 Engine Board Details

Section 5 Communication Interface Details

Section 6 Physical and User Interface Details

Section 7 Parallel and Serial I/O Details

Section 8 Environmental and Test Procedures

 

Slide 17:

Learning Objective #3

Structure of the ATC 5201 Standard (cont.)

Section 9 Performance and Material Requirements

Section 10 Quality Control

Appendix A Linux Operating System and Minimum Kernel Configuration

Appendix B Required Device Driver Interfaces

Appendix C Historical Background of Traffic Controllers

 

Slide 18:

Learning Objective #3

Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs)

Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.). Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.)," consists of large pictures of two different TFCS architectures. The intent of the slide is to highlight some of the major TFCS architectures in use today. The first image is a picture of a TFCS that is about 4 feet tall and 2 ½ feet wide with the door open and out of view. It has two shelves approximately 1/3 and 2/3 down from the top of the cabinet. On the top shelf sit two cuboid electronic devices. The cuboid device on the left of the shelf is wider that it is tall and appears to be an assembly of other thinner devices that sit inside it. The devices inside each have small lights going down the middle of them. The device on the right of the shelf is taller than it is wide. It has lights along the lower left side of the device. On the second shelf, there is a single larger device that appears to be about 1 foot tall and 1 3/4 feet wide. It has a small screen on its upper face and keys below and to the right of the screen. Below the upper face is a row of four thick round cables attached. There is also a thinner cable attached to a D-type connector to the right. The lower internal back area of the cabinet has an electrical panel with numerous wires attached to it. There is cabling and wiring going throughout the cabinet. The label below this picture says "NEMA TS 1.")

NEMA TS 1

Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.). Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: The second images is a picture of a TFCS that is about 5 1/2 feet tall and 2 feet wide with the door open and out of view. The interior of the cabinet contains a 19 inch wide standard electronic equipment rack. The side metal rails of the rack run along the left and right sides of the front of the cabinet interior. There are four sections of the equipment that extend edge to edge of the cabinet interior attaching to the side rails of the rack with screws.

)

Model 33X

Photos: Econolite and Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 19:

Learning Objective #3

Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.)

Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.). Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.)," consists of large pictures of two different TFCS architectures. The intent of the slide is to highlight the major TFCS architectures in use today. The first image is a picture of a TFCS that is about 4 ½ feet tall and 3 ½ feet wide with the door open and out of view. It has two shelves approximately 1/6 and 2/5 down from the top of the cabinet. On the top shelf sit two cuboid electronic assemblies that appear to be racks for holding for other devices. On the middle shelf are two larger cuboid devices with one being about 1 1/2 feet long and 1 foot high and the other about 1/2 feet wide and 1 foot tall. The former is sitting in the middle of the shelf. The latter is sitting on the right of the shelf. The device sitting in the middle of the shelf has a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen and an assortment of keys to the right of the screen. The device on the right of the shelf has lights running down the left front side of the unit. There are cables running between all of the devices and assemblies. The lower remainder of the cabinet has numerous smaller devices with lights on them that appear to be plugged into an electrical panel in the back of the cabinet interior. The label below this picture says "NEMA TS 2 Cabinet.")

NEMA TS 2 Type 1

Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems (TFCSs) (cont.). Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: The second image is a picture of a TFCS that is about 5 1/2 feet tall and 2 feet wide with the door open and out of view. The interior of the cabinet contains a 19 inch wide standard electronic equipment rack. The side metal rails of the rack run along the left and right sides of the front of the cabinet interior. There are six sections of equipment that extend edge to edge of the cabinet interior attaching to the side rails of the rack with screws. The top section is a single device about 4 inches tall with lights. The second section contains a large single device about 7 inches high. It has a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen and two key pads below the screen. The third section is an assembly of devices. There appears to be common light switches running from the left side to about 2/3 of the way across the assembly. There are three smaller and separate devices on the right 1/3 of the assembly about 2 inches wide each. Two of them are identical. The third device has a handle running down the middle of it. The forth section is an assembly about 10 1/2 inches high and has two rows. The top row has 6 slender devices (about 1 inch wide) that appear to be plugged into the assembly. The right side each row of this assembly contains device that is about 2 inches wide. Most of this assembly appears empty. The fifth section is an assembly that has two rows. It contains fourteen smaller devices with lights on them about two inches wide. There are 6 on the top row and 8 on the lower row. There are two additional devices on the right side of the first row that look to be 3 inches wide. The sixth section appears to be storage and wiring. The label below this picture says "ITS Cabinet v01.")

ITS Cabinet v01

Photos: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 20:

Learning Objective #3

Features for ATC Controller Units

Major Operational Features

 

Slide 21:

Learning Objective #3

Manage/Configure Controller Applications

2.3.1.1 Install/Update Applications Software Quickly and Efficiently

2.3.1.2 Install/Upgrade Operating System (O/S) Quickly and Efficiently

2.3.1.3 Manage Clock/Calendar Function and Synchronize with Reliable External Source

2.3.1.4 Configure and Verify Parameters for Particular Local Applications

 

Slide 22:

Learning Objective #3

Manage/Configure Controller Applications (cont.)

2.3.1.5 Upload/Download Data Block(s) as needed to Transfer Files and Accommodate Bulk Transfers of New Application Databases

2.3.1.6 Monitor and Verify Present Applications Status

2.3.1.7 Allow Operator Control of Application Execution

2.3.1.8 Facilitate the Long-Term Storage of Data for Logging and other Data Storage Applications

 

Slide 23:

Learning Objective #3

Manage External Devices

2.3.2.1 Manage/Control a Variety of External Field Devices

2.3.2.2 Monitor the Output and Status of a Variety of External Field Devices

 

Slide 24:

Learning Objective #3

Facilitate Ease of Maintenance and Future Hardware/Software Updates

2.3.3.1 Maintain/Update Controller Hardware

2.3.3.2 Maintain/Update Controller Software

2.3.3.3 Support Diagnostics

 

Slide 25:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 26:

Learning Objective #3

Which of the following is NOT a purpose of the ATC standards program?

Answer Choices

  1. General purpose field computing platform
  2. Grow with technology
  3. Open architecture
  4. Compact

 

Slide 27:

Learning Objective #3

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) General purpose field computing platform
Incorrect. Defining a general purpose field computing platform for the transportation community is the primary purpose of the ATC standards program.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Grow with technology
Incorrect. Being able to grow with technology is a purpose of the ATC standards program mitigating obsolescence.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Open architecture
Incorrect. Being an open architecture so that anyone can build products for it is a purpose of the ATC standards program.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Compact
Correct. Being compact is not a purpose of the ATC standards program, however, the modular architecture is conducive to creating units of various sizes.

 

Slide 28:

Learning Objective #3

Which of the following is NOT a major feature of ATC controller units?

Answer Choices

  1. Manage/Configure applications
  2. Windows operating system
  3. Manage external devices
  4. Facilitate ease of maintenance and future hardware/software updates

 

Slide 29:

Learning Objective #3

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Manage/Configure applications
Incorrect. Managing and configuring application programs are major features of ATC controller units.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) Windows operating system
Correct. A Windows operating system is not a major feature of the ATC controller. A Linux O/S is used.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Manage external devices
Incorrect. Being able to manage external devices is a major feature of ATC controller units.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Facilitate ease of maintenance and future hardware/software updates
Incorrect. Making it easy to maintain controller units and make updates are major features of ATC controllers.

 

Slide 30:

Summary of Learning Objective #3

Identify the Features of the ATC 5201 Advanced Transportation Controller Standard

 

Slide 31:

Learning Objective #4 - Describe the ATC 5201 Architecture

 

Slide 32:

Learning Objective #4

Key Elements of the ATC 5201 Architecture

 

Slide 33:

Learning Objective #4

ATC Engine Board Concept

ATC Engine Board Concept. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "ATC Engine Board Concept," is an enlarged graphic representation of a circuit board. It is twice as wide as it is tall. There are seven variously shaped labeled rectangles representative of electronic components on the board. They are labeled "ENET 1," "ENET 2," "USB," "RTC," "CPU + LINUX O/S," "MEMORY" and "SERIAL I/O." There are two additional rectangles, identical in shape, representative of electronic connectors at the top and bottom of the board.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 34:

Learning Objective #4

Engine Board Interfaces

Engine Board Interfaces. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Engine Board Interfaces," is an enlarged graphic representation of a circuit board. It is twice as tall as it is wide. In the bottom left of the board is the label "ENGINE BOARD." There are eleven identically shaped smaller rectangles representative of electronic interfaces for an Engine Board. These rectangles are about 5% of the engine board in height and about 5 times as wide as they are tall. There are five rectangles centered on the left edge of the engine board and six rectangles centered on the right edge of the engine board. The rectangles on the right are distributed evenly along the right edge of the Engine Board. The five rectangles on the left are distributed so that they are at the same heights as the first five rectangles on the right. All of the rectangles have a short line extending out of the left side, for the rectangles on the left, and out of the right side for the rectangles on the right. The five rectangles on the left are labeled "CONSOLE," "SERIAL PORT 1," "SERIAL PORT 2," "SERIAL PORT 3," and "FRONT PANEL" (top to bottom). The six rectangles on the right are labeled "FIELD I/O DEV 1," "FIELD I/O DEV 2," "USB MEM DEV," "DATAKEY," "ETHERNET 1," and "ETHERNET 2" (top to bottom). To the left of the graphic is a label "TO HOST MODULE" running vertically bottom to top. To the right of the graphic is a label "TO HOST MODULE" running vertically top to bottom.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 35:

Learning Objective #4

Example Engine Board

Example Engine Board. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Example Engine Board," is photograph of an actual 5"W X 4"H Engine Board. There are various electronic chips on the board that have a rounded rectangle graphics surrounding them. The rounded rectangles have curved lines extending outside the picture with labels to identify the chips on the Engine Board. Just left of center of the board is a large chip that is approximately 1"W X 1"H. It is labeled "CPU." To the left and slightly higher than the CPU are two chips that are approximately .33"W X .67"H. The chips are aligned side by side. They are labeled "DRAM." Below the DRAM are two other chips approximately .5"W X .5"H each. The chips are side by side. They are labeled "Flash Memory." Below the left Flash Memory chip is a chip approximately .25"W X .25"H. The chip is labeled "SRAM." Below the right Flash Memory chip is a chip approximately .25"W X .25"H. The chip is labeled "USB." To the right of the CPU is a chip approximately .5"W X .5"H. The chip is labeled "ENET 1&2." Right of the ENET 1&2 chip, near the right edge of the Engine Board, is a chip approximately .25"W X .25"H. It is labeled "RTC." Near the right lower corner of the Engine Board is a chip approximately .33"W X .67"H. It is labeled "Serial I/O.")

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz Photo: Intelight

 

Slide 36:

Learning Objective #4

Linux Board Support Package (BSP) and Layered Architecture Allows Any Qualified Processors to be Used on an Engine Board

Linux Board Support Package (BSP) and Layered Architecture Allows Any Qualified Processors to be Used on an Engine Board. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Linux Board Support Package (BSP) and Layered Architecture Allows Any Qualified Processors to be Used on an Engine Board," is a graphic. At the bottom of the graphic centered on the slide it appears to be the side view of an Engine Board graphic as described in Slide 32 (no labels shown). The Engine Board is about 60% the width of the slide. Above the Engine Board is a large rectangle that is as wide as the Engine Board and twice the height. It is labeled "LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS." Above the large rectangle is a smaller rectangle that is approximately 1/3 the width and 1/2 the height of the large rectangle. It is labeled "APPLICATION SW." Above this smaller rectangle is a slightly smaller rounded rectangle. It is approximately 1/3 the width and the same height as the rectangle below it. It is labeled "OPERATIONAL USER." All of the rectangles are centered above the Engine Board. Between the Engine Board and the large rectangle and between each of the rectangles above them are single heavy dashed lines running in parallel horizontally from a point just beyond the left side of the engine board to nearly the right side of the slide (total of three lines). Between the Engine Board and the large rectangle and between each of the rectangles above them are heavy solid double arrows pointing upwards and downwards. Below each dashed line, to the right of the Engine Board and rectangles, are the labels "APPLICATION LAYER," "ATC BOARD SUPPORT PACKAGE LAYER" and "HARDWARE LAYER" (top to bottom). To the left of the Engine Board and large rectangle is a label "HARDWARE & OS DEFINED BY ATC 5201 STANDARD" set in a rounded rectangle. Adjacent to the right of the rounded rectangle and left of the Engine Board is a large left bracket indicating that the label in the rounded rectangle applies to the Engine Board and large rectangle.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 37:

Learning Objective #4

Controllers Meeting Other Standards Built Using the Engine Board

Controllers Meeting Other Standards Built Using the Engine Board. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Controllers Meeting Other Standards Built Using the Engine Board," is a graphic illustrating how the Engine Board can be used to build controller units that are of different designs. The Engine Board shown in Slide 32 is shown in the lower center of the slide. Its width is about 40% the width of the slide. To the upper left and upper right of the Engine Board are graphics of other electronic boards about equal in size to the Engine Board. They have labels above them "2070 Host Module" and "NEMA Host Module," respectively. The Host Boards are rectangular but angled inward towards the Engine Board. The 2070 Host Module has a slender metallic plate perpendicular to the board on the left side. There is a slender connector running along the right edge of the board. In the center of the board is an Engine Board that takes up approximately 75% the width of the Host Module. The Engine Board is outlined by a heavy dashed line. The NEMA Host Module has a small rectangular connector and four circular connectors running along the bottom of the board. They are all approximately 25% of Host Board in height. There is a slender connector running along the right side of the Host Board but not quite to the edge. There are metallic circles in each of the corners of the board. In the center of the board is an Engine Board that takes up approximately 50% the width of the Host Module. The Engine Board is outlined by a heavy dashed line. There are four heavy dashed lines connecting the corners of the large Engine Board to the four corners of the Engine Board on the 2070 Host Module. There are four heavy dashed lines connecting the corners of the large Engine Board to the four corners of the Engine Board on the NEMA Host Module.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 38:

Learning Objective #4

Engine Board Hardware Upgrade Capability

 

Slide 39:

Learning Objective #4

Examples of ATC Controller Units

Examples of ATC Controller Units. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Examples of ATC Controller Units," contains five photographs of controllers of various shapes, sizes and designs. All of the controllers have a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen and a key pad with differing arrangements of keys. All of the controllers have various electronic cable connectors including RJ45 jacks typical of Ethernet connections (appear as small dark squares approximately 1/2 " W X 1/2" H), 9 pin Sub D connectors (1" W X 1/2" H) typically used for serial connections, 15 pin Sub D connectors (1.5" W X 1/2" H) typically used for serial connections, 25 pin Sub D connectors (2" W X 1/2" H) typically used for serial connections, and USB ports (1/2" W X 1/4" H) common to computers. Some of the units have round circular connectors about 1.5 inches in diameter. The controllers are arranged three units on the top half of the slide and two units on the bottom half. They are described below going from the top left in a clockwise fashion.

)

Photos: Econolite, Intelight, McCain, Peek, and Trafficware

 

Slide 40:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 41:

Learning Objective #4

Which of the following is critical to being able to replace an Engine Board with a more powerful Engine Board in the future?

Answer Choices

  1. Identical pinout
  2. New host module
  3. Same processor family
  4. Same Engine Board manufacturer

 

Slide 42:

Learning Objective #4

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Identical pinout
Correct. Identical pinout is essential to allow a new Engine Board to replace a previous one.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) New host module
Incorrect. Generally, the Host Module of the existing controller can remain the same although, over time, it is conceivable that a new Host Module may be necessary.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Same processor family
Incorrect. Generally, the Linux BSP allows any qualified processor to be used on an Engine Board.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Same Engine Board manufacturer
Incorrect. Any manufacturer that adheres to the ATC 5201 Standard can produce replacement Engine Boards.

 

Slide 43:

Learning Objective #4

Describe How the ATC 5201 Standard and ATC 5401 Standard Work Together

ATC 5401 Application Programming Interface (API) Standard

 

Slide 44:

Learning Objective #4

Application Programming Interface

Application Programming Interface. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Application Programming Interface," is a graphic illustrating how application programs can share the field outputs (load switches) of a TFCS. The lower left of the slide is a graphic representation of the ITS Cabinet v02 architecture. It shows 6 rectangles about 20% the width of the slide and stacked vertically so that together they are about 50% of the height of the slide. The first (top) rectangle is labeled "CONTROLLER." The second rectangle is labeled "INPUT CAGE." The right 10% of the INPUT CAGE is sectioned and labeled SIU. The third rectangle is identical to the second. The fourth rectangle is labeled "PWR DISTRIBUTION ASSEMBLY." The right 10% of the PWR DISTRIBUTION ASSEMBLY is sectioned and labeled CMU. The fifth rectangle is labeled "OUTPUT CAGE." The right 20% of the OUTPUT CAGE is sectioned into two parts with each part representing 10% of the OUTPUT CAGE. These subsections are labeled "AMU" and "SIU." The sixth rectangle is identical to the fifth. There is a heavy arrow extending out the left side of the CONTROLLER and then points upward to a large graphic representation of an LCD screen of a controller. This LCD screen is about 25% of the height of the slide and extends almost the entire width of the slide. There are 8 lines x 40 fixed width characters across shown in the LCD as follows:

There is a heavy arrow extending out the right side of the OUTPUT CAGE and then points upward to an enlargement of the OUTPUT CAGE which is about 60% the length of the slide. This enlargement shows that the majority of the OUTPUT CAGE is made up of load switches which are represented as sections of the OUTPUT CAGE with three LEDs aligned vertically and centered within the load switch. Seven load switches are shown followed by the AMU and SIU. There is an oval highlighting the first two load switches. There is an oval highlighting the third load switch. There is an oval highlighting the last four load switches. There is an arrow extending from the "Ramp Meter Prgrm" text in the LCD graphic to the first oval. There is an arrow extending from the "Emergency Mngmnt" text in the LCD graphic to the second oval. There is an arrow extending from the "Signal Program" text in the LCD graphic to the third oval.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 45:

Learning Objective #4

ATC Layered S/W Architecture

ATC Layered S/W Architecture. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "ATC Layered S/W Architecture," illustrates the layered architecture defined by the ATC 5201 and ATC 5401 standards. At the bottom of the graphic and centered on the slide is a side view of an Engine Board graphic as described in Slide 32 (no labels shown). The Engine Board is about 60% the width of the slide. Above the Engine Board is a large rectangle that is as wide as the Engine Board and twice the height. It is labeled "LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS." Above the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle is a smaller rectangle that is approximately 1/3 the width and 1/2 the height of the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle. It is labeled "API" and centered over the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle. Above the API rectangle is another rectangle of the same width and height. It is labeled "APPLICATION SW." The APPLICATION SW rectangle is aligned to the right so that only 25% of the APPLICATION SW rectangle is over the API rectangle. Above the APPLICATION SW rectangle is a slightly smaller rounded rectangle. It is approximately 1/3 the width and the same height as the APPLICATION SW rectangle below it. It is labeled "OPERATIONAL USER" and it is centered above the API rectangle, the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle and the Engine Board. Between the Engine Board and the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle and between each of the rectangles above them are single heavy dashed lines running in parallel horizontally from a point just beyond the left side of the engine board to nearly the right side of the slide (total of four lines). Between the Engine Board and the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle and between the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle and the API rectangle are heavy solid double arrows pointing upwards and downwards. Between the right side of the API rectangle and the left side of the APPLICATION SW rectangle is a heavy solid double arrow pointing upwards and downwards. Between the right side of the API rectangle and the left side of the APPLICATION SW rectangle is heavy solid double arrow pointing upwards and downwards. Between the right side of the LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle and the right side of the APPLICATION SW rectangle is a heavy solid double arrow pointing upwards and downwards. Centered between the API rectangle and the OPERATIONAL USER rounded rectangle is a heavy solid double arrow pointing upwards and downwards. There is a heavy solid double arrow pointing to the right side of the OPERATIONAL USER rounded rectangle and making a 90 degree turn downward to the top of the APPLICATION SW rectangle. Below each dashed line, to the right of the Engine Board and rectangles, are the labels "APPLICATION LAYER," "API SOFTWARE LAYER," "ATC BOARD SUPPORT PACKAGE LAYER" and "HARDWARE LAYER" (top to bottom). To the left of the Engine Board and LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle is a label "HARDWARE & OS DEFINED BY ATC 5201 STANDARD" set in a rounded rectangle. Adjacent to the right of the rounded rectangle and left of the Engine Board is a large left bracket indicating that the label in the rounded rectangle applies to the Engine Board and LINUX OS & DEVICE DRIVERS rectangle. To the left of the API rectangle is a label "INTERFACE & BEHAVIOR  DEFINED BY ATC 5401 STANDARD" set in a rounded rectangle. Adjacent to the right of the rounded rectangle and left of the Engine Board is a smaller left bracket indicating that the label in the rounded rectangle applies to the API rectangle.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 46:

Learning Objective #4

ATC Software Portability, Compatibility, and Interchangeability

Portability

 

Slide 47:

Learning Objective #4

Portability Achieved Through Compiling and Linking Software

Portability Achieved Through Compiling and Linking Software. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Portability Achieved Through Compiling and Linking Software," illustrates the method used to make an application program portable to ATC Engine Boards built by different vendors. At the top of the graphic is a rounded rectangle about 1/4 the width and 1/10 the height of the slide. It is centered with the label "Application Software." At the bottom of the graphic are three Engine Boards as described in Slide 32 except they are about 1/8 the width and 1/10 the height of the slide. They are evenly distributed across the bottom portion of the slide. Beneath the three Engine Boards are three corresponding labels "ATC Engine Board From Vendor 1," "ATC Engine Board From Vendor 2" and "ATC Engine Board From Vendor 3." There are three solid arrows pointing downward from the bottom of the rounded rectangle to the three Engine Boards. There is an oval that overlays the middle areas of the arrows (not the points connecting to the rounded rectangles or the Engine Boards). It is about 1/2 the width of the slide and 1/5 the height. It is centered on the slide and it is outlined with a dashed line. It is labeled "Compiling and Linking Using Application Source Code and API Software Libraries.")

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 48:

Learning Objective #4

ATC Software Portability, Compatibility, and Interchangeability

Compatibility

 

Slide 49:

Learning Objective #4

Compatibility Achieved Through Linux O/S and API Software

Compatibility Achieved Through Linux O/S and API Software. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Compatibility Achieved Through Linux O/S and API Software," illustrates how the Linux operating system and API Software allow application programs to be compatible on a single Engine Board. At the top of the graphic are three rounded rectangles about 1/8 the width and 1/10 the height of the slide. They are closely spaced and evenly distributed in the center of the slide horizontally. They are labeled "Application Software 1," "Application Software 2" and "Application Software 3," respectively. At the bottom of the graphic is an Engine Board as described in Slide 32 except they it is about 1/8 the width and 1/10 the height of the slide. It is centered horizontally. Beneath the Engine Boards is a label "ATC Engine Board From Vendor."  Centered above the Engine Board and below the three Application Software rectangles is a rounded rectangle that is about 1/8 the width and 1/10 the height of the slide. It is labeled "Linux O/S and API Software." There is a heavy double arrow from the center bottom Application Software 1 rounded rectangle to the upper left corner of the Linux O/S rounded rectangle. There is a heavy double arrow from the center bottom Application Software 2 rounded rectangle to the center top of the Linux O/S rounded rectangle. There is a heavy double arrow from the center bottom Application Software 3 rounded rectangle to the upper right corner of the Linux O/S rounded rectangle. There is a heavy double arrow from the center bottom Linux O/S rounded rectangle to the Engine Board.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 50:

Learning Objective #4

ATC Software Portability, Compatibility, and Interchangeability

Interchangeability

 

Slide 51:

Learning Objective #4

Interchangeability Possible If Application Features Are Equivalent (subjective)

Interchangeability Possible If Application Features Are Equivalent (subjective). Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Interchangeability Possible If Application Features Are Equivalent (subjective)," illustrates how application program interchangeability is possible using the Linux operating system and API Software. This slide contains the graphic as described in Slide 48. The graphic is aligned slightly to left of the center of this slide. The third (rightmost) rounded rectangle at the top of the graphic (see Slide 48) is labeled "Application Software 3*." There is a fourth rounded rectangle that is the same size as Application Software 3* but it is located at the level of the Linux O/S rounded rectangle (see Slide 48). It is labeled "Application Software 4*." There is a solid curved arrow extending from the top of the Application Software 4* rounded rectangle to the right side of the Application Software 3* rounded rectangle. There is a solid curved arrow extending from the bottom of the Application Software 3* rounded rectangle to the left side of the Application Software 4* rounded rectangle. Below the Application Software 4* rectangle is a rectangle (not rounded) that is about 1/3 the width and 1/10 the height of the slide. It is located slightly higher than the Engine Board (see Slide 48). The rectangle has the label "* Indicates applications are of the same type.")

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 52:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 53:

Learning Objective #4

Which of the following ATC controller resources is NOT shared/managed by the API software?

Answer Choices

  1. Real-Time Clock
  2. Front Panel
  3. Datakey
  4. Field Input/Output

 

Slide 54:

Learning Objective #4

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Real-Time Clock
Incorrect. API software allows multiple programs to set the Real-Time Clock of the controller.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Front Panel
Incorrect. The front panel is managed by the API software so that application programs can share the front panel of the controller and users can switch between programs.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Datakey
Correct. A Datakey is a memory device controlled by the BSP not the API Software.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Field Input/Output
Incorrect. Field Inputs and Outputs are managed by API software, which allows them to be shared across application programs.

 

Slide 55:

Summary of Learning Objective #4

Describe the ATC 5201 Architecture

 

Slide 56:

Learning Objective #5 - Describe How the ATC 5201 Standard Works With Other ITS Standards

 

Slide 57:

Learning Objective #5

ATC 5201 Standard Works with all of the Major Transportation Field Cabinet Systems

 

Slide 58:

Learning Objective #5

Example ATC Controller Units in a Cabinet Architecture

Example ATC Controller Units in a Cabinet Architecture. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "Example ATC Controller Units in a Cabinet Architecture," has two photos showing how ATC controller units can be used in different types TFCSs. The first image of the slide is a picture of a TFCS that is about 4 ½ feet tall and 3 ½ feet wide with the door open and out of view. It has two shelves approximately 1/5 and 2/5 down from the top of the cabinet. On the top shelf on the left side of the cabinet is a cuboid electronic assembly that appears to be double stacked racks for holding for other devices. In the leftmost portions of the racks are devices that are approximately 2.5 inches wide and 4.5 inches high with LEDs and a connector. The remainder of the assembly (top and bottom rack) is empty but appear to be slotted for other devices. On the top shelf center is a second assembly identical to that on the left. On the top shelf right is a cuboid device about 6 inches wide and 6 inches high. It has LEDs and connectors. On the second shelf slightly to the left of center sits a controller unit as described in Slide 38 Controller 1. To the right of this device sitting on the shelf is a cuboid device about 4.5 inches wide and 10.5 inches high. It has LEDs and connectors. Below the second shelf and filling the remainder of the cabinet is a metallic and electronic backplane. In the center top of this back plane are three devices similar to those plugged into the left top shelf assembly. Below these devices are 17 smaller cuboid devices with LEDs that are plugged into the backplane. They are aligned horizontally across the width of the backplane. Below the 17 devices are rows of screws. Except for the 17 smaller cuboid devices, there are cables attached to all of the other devices. The label below this picture says "NEMA TS2 Type 1.")

NEMA TS2 Type 1

Example ATC Controller Units in a Cabinet Architecture. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: The second image is a picture of a TFCS that is about 5 1/2 feet tall and 2 feet wide with the door open and out of view. The interior of the cabinet contains a 19 inch wide standard electronic equipment rack. The side metal rails of the rack run along the left and right sides of the front of the cabinet interior. There are five sections of the equipment that extend edge to edge of the cabinet interior attaching to the side rails of the rack with screws.

)

Model 332 Cabinet

Photos: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 59:

Learning Objective #5

ATC 5201 Standard Provides Computational Power and Interfaces for ITS Communications

 

Slide 60:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 61:

Learning Objective #5

Which of the following is a TRUE statement?

Answer Choices

  1. API Software provides NTCIP communications software for multiple applications
  2. ATC 5201 allows multiple applications to use NTCIP communications simultaneously
  3. ATC environmental requirements are generally the same as TFCS standards and specifications
  4. Most 170 controllers are suitable for NTCIP ASC communications

 

Slide 62:

Learning Objective #5

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) API Software provides NTCIP communications for multiple applications
Incorrect. API software does not provide NTCIP communications directly.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) ATC 5201 allows multiple applications on an ATC controller to use NTCIP communications simultaneously
Correct. The Linux O/S supports multiple network addressing allowing multiple applications to use NTCIP at the same time.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) ATC environmental requirements are generally the same as TFCS standards and specifications
Incorrect. ATC environmental requirements are generally greater than TFCS standards and specifications.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Most 170 controllers are suitable for NTCIP ASC communications
Incorrect. Most TFCSs that use 170 controllers will require replacement controllers to perform full functioning NTCIP ASC communications.

 

Slide 63:

Summary of Learning Objective #5

Describe How the ATC 5201 Standard Works

With Other ITS Standards

 

Slide 64:

Learning Objective #6 - Specify ATC Equipment for System and Equipment Procurements

 

Slide 65:

Learning Objective #6

How ATC 5201 Fits into the Systems Life Cycle

How ATC 5201 Fits into the Systems Life Cycle. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "How ATC 5201 Fits into the Systems Life Cycle," illustrates how a systems life cycle may be represented as a V-like formation called the Vee Diagram. The Vee Diagram is depicted as a thick light blue graphic "V" with a short horizontal portion (same thickness as the "V" portion graphic) at the left top of the "V" extending to the left and a short horizontal portion at the right top of the "V" extending to the right. It is said that it looks like the letter "V" with wings. There is a long thin horizontal arrow which points to the right at the bottom of the slide with the words "Time Line" sitting on top of it. The arrow extends along the bottom of the slide covering the distance of most of the V-like graphic.

The thick lines of the Vee Diagram are sectioned by dark blue lines to delineate the systems life cycle activities (identified below as lifecycle processes). There is a small legend on the lower right of the slide indicating these dark blue lines indicate "Document/Approval." From left to right on the left horizontal portion, there are two sections labeled: "Regional Architecture(s)" and "Feasibility Study / Concept Exploration". Moving downward on the left side of the Vee Diagram there are four sections labeled: "Concept of Operations," "System Requirements," "High-Level Design," and "Detailed Design". There is a bottom section at the vertex of the Vee Diagram labeled: "Software/Hardware Development Field Installation." Moving upward on the right side of the Vee Diagram there are four sections labeled: "Unit/Device Testing," "Subsystem Verification," "System Verification & Deployment," and "System Validation." From left to right on the right horizontal portion there are three sections labeled: "Operations and Maintenance," "Changes and Upgrades" and "Retirement/Replacement." There is an arrow that points downward along the edge of the left side of the Vee Diagram with the label "Decomposition and Definition." At the vertex of the Vee Diagram, there is the label "Implementation." There is an arrow that points upward along the right side of the Vee Diagram with the label "Integration and Recomposition." 

In a smaller font, underneath the left horizontal portion there are the words "Lifecycle Processes" identifying the sections of the Vee Diagram as life cycle processes. In the same size font at the vertex of the Vee Diagram are the words "Development Processes." It is intended that this identify the nine lifecycle processes "Concept of Operations" through "Systems Validation" as development processes. There are dotted horizontal lines with arrows at each end indicating a relationship between the processes on the left and right sides of the "V" as follows:

The slide has animation. As the instructor discusses each of the development processes, a circle is drawn around the process on the Vee Diagram.)

 

Slide 66:

Learning Objective #6

How ATC 5201 Fits in the Systems Life Cycle

 

Slide 67:

Learning Objective #6

How ATC 5201 Fits in the Systems Life Cycle

How ATC 5201 Fits into the Systems Life Cycle. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "How ATC 5201 Fits into the Systems Life Cycle," illustrates how deployments of ATC controller units may occur at any point in the life of a system. This graphic is based on the identical graphic use in Slide 65 for the Vee Diagram. There is an oval encompassing the Software/Hardware Development Field Installation section at vertex (bottom) of the Vee Diagram. There is a single oval encompassing the subsequent four sections of the diagram including: Unit/Device Testing, Subsystem Verification, System Verification & Deployment, and System Validation. There is a single oval encompassing the subsequent two sections: Operations and Maintenance and Changes and Upgrades. There is an oval encompassing the final section, Retirement/Replacement. The entire diagram and ovals are encompassed by a rounded rectangle. The slide has animation. As the instructor discusses each of the development encompassed sections and then the entire diagram, the ovals and rounded rectangle appear.)

 

Slide 68:

Learning Objective #6

Develop Migration Strategies

 

Slide 69:

Learning Objective #6

Develop Migration Strategies (cont.)

 

Slide 70:

Learning Objective #6

ATC Standards Update

 

Slide 71:

Learning Objective #6

Mitigating Deployment Issues

 

Slide 72:

Learning Objective #6

Mitigating Deployment Issues (cont.)

 

Slide 73:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 74:

Learning Objective #6

What is the best way to migrate to ATC equipment?

Answer Choices

  1. Use existing TFCSs and replace older controllers with ATC controller units
  2. Use existing operational software that has a version suitable for ATC controller units
  3. Replace controller units as part of regular scheduled maintenance
  4. All equally good and it depends on the needs of the agency

 

Slide 75:

Learning Objective #6

Review of answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Use existing TFCSs and replace older controllers with ATC controller units
Incorrect. This is a good option for migrating to ATC equipment but agencies must define their needs and goals to assess what is best.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Use existing operational software that has a version suitable for ATC controller units
Incorrect. This is a good option for migrating to ATC equipment but agencies must define their needs and goals to assess what is best.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Replace controller units as part of regular scheduled maintenance
Incorrect. This is a good option for migrating to ATC equipment but agencies must define their needs and goals to assess what is best.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All equally good and it depends on the needs of the agency
Correct. All of the items listed can be part of a migration strategy. Agency must define their needs and goals to assess what is best.

 

Slide 76:

Learning Objective #6

Creating a Specification Based on the ATC 5201 Standard

 

Slide 77:

Learning Objective #6

Creating a Specification Based on the ATC 5201 Standard

 

Slide 78:

Learning Objective #6

Concept of Operations

 

Slide 79:

Learning Objective #6

Concept of Operations (con't)

 

Slide 80:

Learning Objective #6

Requirements for specifications that use ATC 5201 v06

 

Slide 81:

Learning Objective #6

Proposed Organization of Requirements

 

Slide 82:

Learning Objective #6

Referenced Documents and Precedence

In the case there is a conflict between the requirements in referenced documents that is not directly addressed by a stated requirement, the precedence of the referenced documents shall be as follows:

  1. Agency Specific Requirements
  2. ATC 5201 Standard v06 Requirements
  3. TFCS Requirements (e.g. NEMA TS 2, Model 33X, ITS Cabinet v01)

 

Slide 83:

Learning Objective #6

General Requirements

 

Slide 84:

Learning Objective #6

TFCS Requirements

 

Slide 85:

Learning Objective #6

User Interface Requirements - ATC Minimum

User Interface Requirements  ATC Minimum. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, titled "User Interface Requirements – ATC Minimum," highlights the minimum ATC user interface requirements. The graphic consists of three large text boxes that are aligned vertically and extend the width of the slide. They are outlined by heavy solid lines. The content of the text boxes is as follows: Text Box 1 (top): CPU ACTIVE LED Indicator, Ethernet Port, USB Port (for removable memory device only). Text Box 2 (middle): EIA-574, 9-pin "D" serial connector for console OR RJ45, serial connector for console. Text Box 3 (bottom): EIA-574, 9-pin "D" connector for an external front panel OR Keyboard, LCD, Bell. There is a large plus sign between Text Box 1 and Text Box 2 and between Text Box 2 and Text Box three all centered on the slide.)

Graphics: Ralph W. Boaz

 

Slide 86:

Learning Objective #6

User Interface Requirements - ATC Options

 

Slide 87:

Learning Objective #6

User Interface Requirements

Agencies are cautioned to verify that these types of interfaces will also operate in a mode that supports the basic ATC 5201 and ATC 5401 Standards

 

Slide 88:

Learning Objective #6

Serial and Parallel I/O Requirements

Agencies are cautioned to not unnecessarily require communications ports as it can drive up costs and limit choices of vendors

 

Slide 89:

Learning Objective #6

Engine Board CPU and Memory Requirements

Agencies are cautioned not to arbitrarily require the highest number of MIPS and memory available as it can drive up costs and limit choices of vendors

 

Slide 90:

Learning Objective #6

Environmental and Testing Requirements

 

Slide 91:

Learning Objective #6

Warranty Requirements

 

Slide 92:

Learning Objective #6

Other Requirements

 

Slide 93:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

 

Slide 94:

Learning Objective #6

Which of the following is a good practice when preparing a specification using ATC 5201 v06?

Answer Choices

  1. Establish a precedence of referenced standards and specifications
  2. Always specify the fastest CPU available
  3. Always specify several extra serial ports than you need
  4. Never exceed the minimum user interface requirements of the ATC 5201 Standard

 

Slide 95:

Learning Objective #6

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Establish a precedence of referenced standards and specifications
Correct. This is important since an ATC 5201 based specification is a composite of other documents.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Always specify the fastest CPU available
Incorrect. Agencies should consider leaving themselves options and assess the entire unit proposed by vendors.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Always specify several more serial ports than you need
Incorrect. This may limit choices of controller units and may increase costs.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Never exceed the minimum user interface requirements
Incorrect. User interfaces may exceed those of ATC 5201 as long as the basic operation is still achievable.

 

Slide 96:

Summary of Learning Objective #6

Specify ATC Equipment for System and Equipment Procurements

 

Slide 97:

What We Have Learned

  1. The ATC 5201 Standard provides for controller units that can grow with technology using an Engine Board concept.
  2. The ATC 5201 Standard can be used to specify ATC controller units that can operate in any major TFCS architecture.
  3. The ATC 5201 Standard works with the ATC 5401 Standard to provide for portable, compatible and interchangeable application programs.
  4. Agencies will reference other ITS standards or specifications in preparing an ATC 5201 specification.

 

Slide 98:

Resources

 

Slide 99:

Questions? A placeholder graphic image with word Questions? at the top, and an image of a lit light bulb on the lower right side.

 

Slide 100:

Next Course Module

A208: Using the ATC 5401 Application Programming Interface Standard to Leverage ITS Infrastructures

  1. Identify the features of the ATC 5401 Application Programming Interface (API) Standard
  2. Describe the ATC 5401 Architecture
  3. Describe how the ATC 5401 Standard works with other ITS standards
  4. Specify API software for system and equipment procurements