Module 31 - A315a

A315a: Understanding User Needs for Actuated Traffic Signal (ASC) Controllers Based on NTCIP 1202 Standard v03

HTML of the PowerPoint Presentation

(Note: This document has been converted from a PowerPoint presentation to 508-compliant HTML. The formatting has been adjusted for 508 compliance, but all the original text content is included, plus additional text descriptions for the images, photos and/or diagrams have been provided below.)


Slide 1:

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters. ITS Training Standards “WELCOME” slide, with reference to the U.S. Department of Transportation Office of Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

 

Slide 2:

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters, photo of Kenneth Leonard, Director ITS Joint Program Office - Ken.Leonard@dot.gov - and on the bottom is a screeshot of the ITS JPO website - www.pcb.its.dot.gov

 

Slide 3:

Module A315a

Understanding User Needs for Actuated Traffic Signal Controllers (ASC) Based on NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

This slide contains two photos. The photo on the left is a picture of a street in New York City with several traffic signals and the photo on the right is a traffic signal controller cabinet with its door open and an Actuated Traffic Signal Controller (ASC).

 

Slide 4:

Instructor

Photo of Patrick Chan, P.E., Senior Technical Staff, Consensus Systems Technologies, Flushing, NY, U.S.A.

Patrick Chan, P.E.

Senior Technical Staff

Consensus Systems Technologies

Flushing, NY, U.S.A.

 

Slide 5:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 6:

Learning Objective 1

 

Slide 7:

Review the Structure of the NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

Overview

 

Slide 8:

How This Standard Fit into the Family of NTCIP Standards

This slide contains on the left of a photo of the same traffic signal controller cabinet with its door open and an Actuated Traffic Signal Controller (ASC) as in slide #3.

Source: New York City Department of Transportation

What is Actuated Signal Controller?

 

Slide 9:

How This Standard Fit into the Family of NTCIP Standards

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide consists of a graphic of the communication levels of the NTCIP standards. The bottom level is the Plant Level and includes boxes for Dial-up, Fiber, Coax, Wireless, Twisted Pair, and Leased Line. The next higher level is called the Subnetwork Level and includes PPP, Ethernet, and PMPP. The next level is called the Transport Level and includes /IP, UDP/IP, and T2/NULL. The next level is called the Application Level and includes C2C XML, DATEX, FTP, TFTP, SNMP, and STMP. The next level is called the Information Level and includes C2C Messages, Files, Data Objects, and Dynamic Objects. These boxes are connected to an overarching box also in the Information Level labeled Functional Area Data Dictionaries with the left-hand side identifying C2C Data Dictionaries and the right-hand side labeled NTCIP Data Dictionaries. The NTCIP Data Dictionaries is highlighted with a circle indicating that it is the subject of the NTCIP 1201 and 1202 standards.)

Source: NTCIP 9001 v04

 

Slide 10:

How This Standard Fit into the Family of NTCIP Standards

What is NTCIP 1202?

 

Slide 11:

How This Standard Fit into the Family of NTCIP Standards

History of NTCIP 1202

 

Slide 12:

Understand the Relationship Between NEMA TS2 and NTCIP 1202

What is NTCIP 1202?

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide consists of a graphic showing a network of components in a controller assembly. There are three elements in the network: Controller unit, external devices, and cabinet subsystems. Within the cabinet subsystems, there are seven sub elements: signal monitoring unit, bus/serial interface unit or parallel IO, power distribution, flashers, load switches, auxiliary I/O devices, and detector units. The controller unit has connections to external devices, the signal monitoring unit, the bus/serial interface unit or parallel IO, and detector units. The signal monitoring unit has connections to power distribution, flashers, load switches, auxiliary I/O devices, and detector units. The bus/serial interface unit or parallel IO element has connections to power distribution, flashers, load switches, auxiliary I/O devices, and detector units.)

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 13:

Understand the Relationship Between NEMA TS2 and NTCIP 1202

What is NTCIP 1202?

 

Slide 14:

Understand the Relationship Between NEMA TS2 and NTCIP 1202

Example:

 

Slide 15:

Understand the Relationship Between NEMA TS2 and NTCIP 1202

What is NTCIP 1202?

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following bullet list with an additional note as indicated below:

To the side of the bullet list, there is a note: "NEMA TS2 defines the range from 3 to 25.5 seconds but for encoding purposes, NTCIP 1202 allows 0 to 25.5 seconds". The note is pointing to the slide text saying "Minimum TS2 Clause 3.5.3.1: Minimum Requirements-Minimum Range: 3-25.5 seconds". The note also points to the slide text saying NTCIP 1202 Clause 5.2.2.8 syntax: INTEGER (0..255).)

 

Slide 16:

Understand the Relationship Between NEMA TS2 and

NTCIP 1202

What is NTCIP 1202?

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide shows a Venn diagram of three overlapping circles. One is red, another is yellow, and the final one is blue.

The red circle is titled Hardware Specification with a list that says:

The yellow circle is titled Interface Specification with a list that says

The blue circle is titled Functional Specification with a text that says "NEMA TS2 and/or Agency Specifications".)

 

Slide 17:

Review the Structure of NTCIP 1202 v03

NTCIP 1202 v03 Document Organization

This slide contains on the right a snapshot of the cover page of the NTCIP 1202 v03a standard.

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 18:

Review the Structure of NTCIP 1202 v03

NTCIP 1202 v03 Document Organization

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 19:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 20:

Question

Which of the below is NOT a true statement about NTCIP 1202 v03?

Answer Choices

  1. Part of the NTCIP Family of Standards
  2. Contains systems engineering content
  3. Describes the hardware functionality of a traffic controller
  4. Contains user needs to manage a traffic controller

 

Slide 21:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Part of the NTCIP Family of Standards
Incorrect. NTCIP 1202 v03 is an information standard in the NTCIP family of standards.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Contains systems engineering content
Incorrect. NTCIP 1202 v03 contains systems engineering content.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Describes the hardware functionality of a traffic controller
Correct! NTCIP 1202 v03 does not describe the hardware functionality, but other standards such as NEMA TS 2 do.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Contains user needs to manage a traffic controller
Incorrect. NTCIP 1202 v03 contains user needs.

 

Slide 22:

Learning Objective 2

 

Slide 23:

Identify Specific ASC Operational Needs

Overview

 

Slide 24:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Concept of Operations (ConOps)

 

Transportation system managers use ASCs to control traffic operations on a roadway. ASCs allow different conflicting movements to travel across a roadway in a safe, orderly manner. In a roadway network, ASCs can be coordinated to improve mobility of certain movements, such as along a major arterial.

- NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 25:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Operational Context of NTCIP 1202 v03

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide consists of a graphic that depicts the reference physical architecture for an ASC system reproduced from the NTCIP 1202 v03 standard.

On top is an icon of a laptop labeled "Maintenance Laptop". To the left of the Maintenance Laptop is an icon of a desktop computer labeled "Traffic Management System". To the left of the Traffic Management System is an icon of a server labeled "Connected Vehicle Back Office Systems". There is a solid, bi-directional arrow between the Connected Vehicle Back Office Systems and the Traffic Management System. There is a solid, bi-directional arrow between the Connected Vehicle Back Office Systems and a box labeled Roadside Unit (RSU) directly below. To the right of the Roadside Unit is a yellow box labeled Controller Unit (CU). To the right of the Controller Unit (CU) is a box labeled Cabinet Subsystems. There is a solid, bi-directional arrow between Controller Unit (CU) and the Cabinet Subsystems.

The Roadside Unit is connected to the Controller Unit, Maintenance Laptop, and the Traffic Management System with red dotted lines. Additionally, the Controller Unit is directly connected to the Traffic Management System and the Maintenance Laptop with red dotted lines.

Below the box labeled Roadside Unit (RSU) is an icon of a modem labeled "DSRC modem". There is a solid, bi-directional arrow labeled "SAE J2735 + Modem Control" between the Roadside Unit and the DSRC Modem.

At the bottom are various icons including of a car, a truck, a bus, a firetruck, a bicycle, a pedestrian with a mobile device, CCTV camera with loop detectors labelled "Vehicle Detection Subsystems", and a traffic signal with a pedestrian walk sign. The DSRC modem is connected to the car, the truck, the bus, the firetruck, the bicycle, and the pedestrian with purple dashed lines. The Cabinet Subsystems is connected to the truck, the bus, the firetruck, the bicycle, the pedestrian, the Vehicle Detection Subsystems, and the traffic signal with solid black lines.

Communications from the truck are labelled "Freight Priority Requests". Communications from the bus are labelled "Transit Priority Requests". Communications from the firetruck are labelled "Preemption Requests".

Red dotted lines represent communications using NTCIP 1202 or other NTCIP standards. Purple dashed lines represent communications using DSRC. Solid black lines are communications using other standards or proprietary.)

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 26:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Current Situation, Problem Statement

 

Slide 27:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

What are User Needs?

This slide contains on the bottom a photograph of a traffic management center.

Source: New York City Department of Transportation

 

Slide 28:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Illustration of an ASC User Need

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following bullet items:

Additionally, it has a red circle circling the user need identifier, 2.5.2.1.1, then a red circle circling the user need title, then a red circle circling the user need description.)

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 29:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

User Needs Organization

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 30:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Provide Live Data

This slide contains a picture of a traffic management center (TMC) on the bottom left. On the bottom right is a box with text that says "What signal timing pattern to use?". There is an arrow from the TMC to the box that says "Control Command" and an arrow from the box to the TMC that says "Response".

Source: New York City Department of Transportation

 

Slide 31:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Provide Dynamic Object Data

 

Slide 32:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Provide Block Data

 

Slide 33:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Provide for Log Data Local Storage and Retrieval

 

Slide 34:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Provide for Database Management

 

Slide 35:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Condition-based Exception Reporting

 

Slide 36:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Summary of User Needs Supported

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 37:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage the ASC Configuration: Retrieve Device Identity

This slide contains a graphic of a location symbol on the right.

 

Slide 38:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage the ASC Configuration: Manage Communications

This slide contains a graphic of a do not symbol on the right.

 

Slide 39:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage the ASC Configuration: Monitor Cabinet Environment

Manage the ASC Configuration: Monitor Power

This slide contains a photograph of the inside of a traffic signal cabinet.

Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fd/TrafficControlBox.jpg

 

Slide 40:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage the ASC Configuration: Retrieve Operational Performance Data

 

Slide 41:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage the ASC Configuration: Manage Auxiliary External Inputs/Outputs

Manage the ASC Configuration: Manage Database

 

Slide 42:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Signal Operations: Manage Signal Configuration

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains a ring-barrier diagram of eight traffic phases at a traffic signal. The first phase is a protected left turn from the side street to the main street going south. The second phase is protected through phase from west to east on the side street with a permissive right turn from the side street onto the main street going south and a pedestrian phase across the south end of the main street. The third phase is a protected left turn from the main street to the side street going west. The fourth phase is a protected through phase on the main street from north to south with a permissive right turn from the main street to the side street going west and a pedestrian phase across the west end of the side street. The fifth phase is a protected left turn from the side street to the main street going north. The sixth phase is a protected through phase on the side street from east to west with a permissive right turn onto the main street going north along with a pedestrian phase across north end the main street. The seventh phase is a protected left turn from the main street to the side street going east. The eighth phase is a protected through phase on the main street from south to north with a permissive right turn onto the side street going east and a permissive pedestrian phase across the side street east end.

Phases one, two, three, and four are in one ring. Phases five, six, seven, and eight are in the second ring. The diagram shows the first ring on the left of the second ring.

There are four ring barriers in the cycle. From left to right, phases one and five are followed the first ring barrier, then phases two and six followed by the second ring barrier. Then phases three and seven followed by third ring barrier, then phases four and eight followed by the final ring barrier.)

Source: https://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/publications.htm

 

Slide 43:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Signal Operations: Manage Signal Configuration

This slide contains a graphic of a traffic signal.

 

Slide 44:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Signal Operations: Monitor Signal Operations Status

This slide contains a graphic of an electrical pulse.

 

Slide 45:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Signal Operations: Monitor Signal Operations Status

 

Slide 46:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Signal Operations: Control Signal Operations

 

Slide 47:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Signal Operations: Control Signal Operations

 

Slide 48:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Detectors: Manage Detector Configuration

This slide contains a graphic of a loop detector in the street connected to data collection equipment.

Source: https://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/publications.htm

 

Slide 49:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Detectors: Monitor Detector Status

Manage Detectors: Monitor Detector Health

Manage Detectors: Control Detectors

 

Slide 50:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Detectors: Manage Detector Data

 

Slide 51:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Connected Vehicles (CV) Interface:

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide consists of a connected vehicle context diagram from NTCIP 1202 v03. There are three elements: a RoadSide Unit (RSU), an ASC process (depicted in a green circle), and Traffic Management System (depicted in a light grey box). The RSU is depicted by a red dashed box and consists of a CV Roadside Process, depicted as a light blue circle and a DSRC Radio, depicted by a light grey box. There is an arrow from the ASC process to the Traffic Management System that says "SPAT data". There is an arrow from the Traffic Management System to the ASC process that says "Manage ASC". There is an arrow from the ASC Process to the CV Roadside Process that says "SPAT Data". There is an arrow from the CV Roadside Process to the ASC Process that says "CV Detector Actuations". There is an arrow from the CV Roadside Process to the Traffic Management System that says "Map-data, Manage CV Detectors". There is an arrow from the Traffic Management System to the CV Roadside Process that says "MAP Broadcasts". There is an arrow from the CV Roadside Process to the DSRC Radio that says "SPAT/MAP". There is an arrow from the DSRC Radio to the CV Roadside Process that says "BSM/PSM".)

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 52:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Connected Vehicles (CV) Interface: Management Station - ASC Process Interface

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide has a photograph of an Actuated Solid-State Traffic Controller at the bottom right with Ethernet Ports available for connection to CV units. On the bottom left is a schematic of a diagram with one traffic signal connected to another traffic signal and an ATC (advanced traffic controller - depicted as a salmon-colored box). A VRU Detection (depicted in a blue box) is connected to ATC. The ATC also is connected to the NYCWiN network (depicted in a salmon-colored box), which is connected to the RSE (in a green box), which is also connected to the ATC.)

Source: New York City Department of Transportation

 

Slide 53:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Connected Vehicles Interface:

Management Station - CV Roadside Process Interface

 

Slide 54:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Connected Vehicles Interface: ASC - CV Roadside Process Interface

 

Slide 55:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

Manage Connected Vehicles Interface: ASC - CV Roadside Process Interface

This slide contains a graphic of two boxes. One box is labeled ASC process. The other box is labeled CV Roadside Process. The two processes are connected with a red, bi-directional arrow.

 

Slide 56:

How NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard Satisfies Operational and Maintenance Needs

User Needs Organization

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 57:

Recognize how TS2 and 1202 are Intertwined

 

Slide 58:

Understand constraints that will impact cost-benefit/tradeoffs

Benefit / Cost Considerations

Source: ISO/IEC 25010:2011

 

Slide 59:

Identifying User Needs not Addressed by the NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

User Needs Not Addressed in NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 60:

Identifying User Needs not Addressed by the NTCIP 1202

v03 Standard

What if a User Need is NOT Found in NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 61:

Identifying User Needs not Addressed by the NTCIP 1202

v03 Standard

What if a User Need is NOT Found in NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 62:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 63:

Question

Which of the below is a benefit of extensions? Answer Choices

  1. Addresses a user need that is not supported by the standard
  2. Addresses interoperability
  3. Changes the cost for testing and maintenance
  4. Requires additions to the agency specification

 

Slide 64:

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Addresses a user need that is not supported by the standard
Correct! Extensions are used to support user needs not addressed by the standard.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Addresses interoperability
Incorrect. Extensions can lead to proprietary solutions that inhibits interoperability.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Changes the costs for testing and maintenance
Incorrect. Extensions lead to additional costs for testing and maintenance.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Requires additions to the agency specification
Incorrect. The agency specification needs to include the definition and description of the extensions.

 

Slide 65:

Learning Objective 3

 

Slide 66:

Describe the Purpose of the Protocol Requirements List (PRL Matrix and Benefits)

Overview

 

Slide 67:

What is a PRL?

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2 Manage Signal Operations M Yes  
2.5.2.1 Manage Signal Configuration M Yes  
2.5.2.1.1 Manage Controller Startup Functions M Yes  
  3.5.2.1.1.1.1 Configure Startup All-Red Flash Mode O Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.1.1.2 Configure Startup Flash Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.1.1.3 Enable/Disable Automatic Pedestrian Clearance Setting M Yes  
3.5.2.1.1.2 Configure Backup Time M Yes  

 

Slide 68:

What is a PRL?

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)

The PRL provides guidance

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2 Manage Signal Operations M Yes  
2.5.2.1 Manage Signal Configuration M Yes  
2.5.2.1.1 Manage Controller Startup Functions M Yes  
  3.5.2.1.1.1.1 Configure Startup All-Red Flash Mode O Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.1.1.2 Configure Startup Flash Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.1.1.3 Enable/Disable Automatic Pedestrian Clearance Setting M Yes  
3.5.2.1.1.2 Configure Backup Time M Yes  

 

Slide 69:

What is a PRL?

User Need - Requirement Relationship

 

Slide 70:

What is a PRL?

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains a graphic with three boxes stacked on top of each other. The box on top has text "One User Need", an arrow pointing right, and text saying "Requirement 1". Outside the top box is text saying "Minimum".

The middle box has text on the left saying "One User Need". To the right of the text is an arrow pointing to the upper right of the box and another arrow pointing to the lower right of the box. The upper right of the box has text that says "Requirement 1" and the lower right of the box has text that says "Requirement n".

The bottom box has text from left to right: text that says "Many User Needs", an arrow pointing right, and text that says "Requirement 1".)

Result: The PRL is a check that the standard has no unnecessary requirement, and all user needs are satisfied by at least one requirement

 

Slide 71:

What is a PRL?

User Need

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.1.9 (Preempt) Manage Preempt Configurations 0 Yes / No  
  3.5.2.1.9.1.1 Enable/Disable Preempt Inputs 0 Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.1 Configure Preempt Control - Non-Locking Memory 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.2 Configure Preempt Control - Preempt Override Flash 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.3 Configure Preempt Control - Preempt Override Priority 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.4 Configure Preempt Control - Flash Dwell 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.3 Configure Preempt Link M Yes  
3.5.2.1.9.1.4 Configure Preempt Delay M Yes  

Additionally, overlaid on the table are two red boxes that highlight the User Need ID column and first cell below it, and another red box that highlights the User Need and FR ID columns and the first row.)

 

Slide 72:

What is a PRL?

User Need

2.5.2.1.9 Manage Preempt Configurations

A manager may need to retrieve and configure the preempts in the ASC. Preempts are used to service special needs at an intersection, such as for a railroad crossing or emergency vehicles responding to an incident. This feature allows the manager to retrieve and configure the minimum durations, phase settings, outputs and clearance times whenever a preempt signal is detected, how the controller enters into and exits out of preemption and to define the priority of different preempt inputs into the ASC. This feature also allows a manager to configure the ASC to enable or disable the preempt under certain conditions, such as time-of-day, or to configure the ASC to select alternate exit strategies based on input conditions.

This slide has a graphic of a confused person.

 

Slide 73:

What is a PRL?

Functional Requirements

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.1.9 Preempt Manage Preempt Configurations 0 Yes / No  
  3.5.2.1.9.1.1 Enable/Disable Preempt Inputs 0 Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.1 Configure Preempt Control - Non-Locking Memory 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.2 Configure Preempt Control - Preempt Override Flash 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.3 Configure Preempt Control - Preempt Override Priority 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.2.4 Configure Preempt Control - Flash Dwell 0.16 (1..*) Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.9.1.3 Configure Preempt Link M Yes  
3.5.2.1.9.1.4 Configure Preempt Delay M Yes  
3.5.2.1.9.1.5 Configure Preempt Minimum Duration M Yes  

Additionally, overlaid on the table are red boxes that highlight the User Need ID and User Need columns, another box highlighting the FR ID column, and finally a box highlighting the Functional Requirement column.)

 

Slide 74:

What is a PRL?

Conformance

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2 Manage Signal Operations M Yes  
2.5.2.1 Manage Signal Configuration M Yes  
2.5.2.1.1 Manage Controller Startup Functions M Yes  
  3.5.2.1.1.1.1 Configure Startup All-Red Flash Mode O Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.1.1.2 Configure Startup Flash Time M Yes  

Additionally, overlaid on the table is a red box that highlights the Conformance column.)

 

Slide 75:

What is a PRL?

Conformance

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.3 Reference Physical Architecture [Informative!      
2.3.1 ASC Characteristics - Cabinet Specifications M Yes  
2.3.1.a (332) Model 332 Cabinet O.1 (1) Yes / No  
2.3.1.b (TS1) NEMA TS 1 Cabinet O.1 (1) Yes / No  
2.3.1.c (TS2-2) NEMA TS 2 Type 2 Cabinet O.1 (1) Yes / No  
2.3.1.d (TS2-1) NEMA TS 2 Type 1 Cabinet O.1 (1) Yes / No  
2.3.1.e (ITS) ITS Cabinet O.1 (1) Yes / No  

Additionally, overlaid on the table is a red box that highlights the Conformance column, starting at row 2.3.1a (332) through the last cell of that column.)

 

Slide 76:

What is a PRL?

Conformance

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following tables with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support
2.5.2.1.9 (Preempt) (Manage Preempt Configurations O Yes / No

 

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.2.8 Monitor Preempt Input State Preempt: M Yes / NA  
  3.5.2.2.8.1 Monitor Currentlt Active Preempt M Yes  
  3.5.2.2.8.2 Monitor Current Preempt Inputs M Yes  
2.5.2.2.9 Monitor Preempt State Preempt: O Yes / NA  
  3.5.2.2.8.3 Monitor Current Preempt Status M Yes  
  3.5.2.2.8.4 Monitor Current Gate Status O Yes / No  

Additionally, overlaid on the first table is a red circle around the cell containing 2.5.2.1.9 (Preempt) and on the second table there are red boxes highlighting the rows beginning with 2.5.2.2.8 and 2.5.2.2.9.)

 

Slide 77:

What is a PRL?

Support Column

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.1.4 Manage Timing Patterns Coord:M Yes / NA  
  3.5.2.1.4.1.1 Configure Pattern Cycle Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.2 Configure Pattern Offset Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.3 Configure Pattern Split Association M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.4 Configure Pattern Sequence Association M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.5 Configure Pattern Maximum Mode O Yes / No  

Additionally, overlaid on the table is a red box highlighting the Support column.)

 

Slide 78:

What is a PRL?

Additional Specifications Column

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.1.4 Manage Timing Patterns Coord:M Yes / NA  
  3.5.2.1.4.1.1 Configure Pattern Cycle Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.2 Configure Pattern Offset Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.3 Configure Pattern Split Association M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.4 Configure Pattern Sequence Association M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.5 Configure Pattern Maximum Mode O Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.4.2.1 Determine Maximum Number of Phase-based Timing Pattern M Yes The ASC shall support at least ____ timing patterns.
3.5.2.1.4.2.2 Determine Phase-based Timing Pattern Type M Yes The ASC shall support one of the following types of signal patterns (Select one only):
____ Each pattern is unique
____ Each pattern consists of a plan with 3 different offsets
____ Each pattern consists of a plan with 5 different offsets

Additionally, overlaid on the table is a red box highlighting the Additional Specifications column.)

 

 

Slide 79:

What is a PRL?

Additional Specifications Column

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
  3.5.2.1.11.2.1 Retrieve Maximum Number of I/O Maps M Yes  
3.5.2.1.11.2.2 Retrieve Maximum Number of I/O Map Inputs M Yes  
3.5.2.1.11.2.3 Retrieve Maximum Number of I/O Map Outputs M Yes  
3.5.2.1.11.2.4 Retrieve I/O Mapping Activate Conditions M Yes The following conditions shall be satisfied before a new I/O map can be activated:
____ Cabinet Door Open
____ in any flash state
____ programmed all red flash
____ in CVM flash ASC restart

Additionally, overlaid on the table is a red box highlighting the Additional Specifications column.)

 

Slide 80:

Explain the Benefits of PRL to Stakeholders

Project PRL: Agency Perspective

This slide has a graphic of a person handing over some papers.

 

Slide 81:

Explain the Benefits of PRL to Stakeholders

Project PRL: Vendor/System Developers Perspective

This slide has a graphic of two people in discussions at a table.

 

Slide 82:

Evaluating the Conformance to the NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

Conformance versus Compliance

 

Slide 83:

Evaluating the Conformance to the NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

Conformance versus Compliance

Source: NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 84:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 85:

Question

Which of the following is a benefit of the PRL table? Answer Choices

  1. Maps needs to requirements
  2. Provides a list of features supported by the standard
  3. Provides a convenient checklist during deployment
  4. All of the above

 

Slide 86:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Maps needs to requirements
This is one of the key benefits of the PRL table.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Provides a list of features supported by the standard
The PRL lists all of the user needs supported by the standard.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Provides a convenient checklist during deployment
The PRL can be used as a checklist for testing.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All of the above
Correct! All of the above statements are true.

 

Slide 87:

Learning Objective 4

 

Slide 88:

Discuss How to Prepare a Project Level PRL

Overview

 

Slide 89:

Review Steps (Tailoring) to Select User Needs and Associated Requirements

Key Points for Completing a Project PRL

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2.1.4 Manage Timing Patterns Coord:M Yes / NA  
  3.5.2.1.4.1.1 Configure Pattern Cycle Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.2 Configure Pattern Offset Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.3 Configure Pattern Split Association M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.4 Configure Pattern Sequence Association M Yes  
3.5.2.1.4.1.5 Configure Pattern Maximum Mode O Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.4.2.1 Determine Maximum Number of Phase-based Timing Pattern M Yes The ASC shall support at least _5_ timing patterns.
3.5.2.1.4.2.2 Determine Phase-based Timing Pattern Type M Yes The ASC shall support one of the following types of signal patterns (Select one only):
_✓_ Each pattern is unique
____ Each pattern consists of a plan with 3 different offsets
____ Each pattern consists of a plan with 5 different offsets

Additionally, overlaid on the table are small red boxes that highlight the words Yes on row 2.5.2.1.4, Yes on 3.5.2.1.4.1.1, Yes on 3.5.2.1.4.1.2, Yes on 3.5.2.1.4.1.3, Yes on 3.5.2.1.4.1.4, No on 3.5.2.1.4.1.5, Yes on 3.5.2.1.4.2.1, Yes on 3.5.2.1.4.2.2. Also, the text has a "5" highlighted in "The ASC shall support at least 5 timing patterns." Also, there is a highlighted check mark next to "Each pattern is unique" in the last row.)

 

Slide 90:

Review Steps (Tailoring) to Select User Needs and Associated Requirements

Key Points for Completing a Project PRL

This slide contains a graphic of a person pointing to the text "PRL must be consistent with the hardware specification"

 

Slide 91:

Review Steps (Tailoring) to Select User Needs and Associated Requirements

Fill-in PRL with User Needs/Requirements

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
  3.5.2.1.3.6.1 Configure Coordination Point - First Phase Green Begin O.10(1..*) Yes/No  
3.5.2.1.3.6.2 Configure Coordination Point - Last Phase Green Begin O.10(1..*) Yes/No  
3.5.2.1.3.6.3 Configure Coordination Point - First Phase Green End O.10(1..*) Yes/No  
3.5.2.1.3.6.4 Configure Coordination Point - Last Phase Green End O.10(1..*) Yes/No  
3.5.2.1.3.6.5 Configure Coordination Point - First Phase Yellow End O.10(1..*) Yes/No  
3.5.2.1.3.6.6 Configure Coordination Point - Last Phase Yellow End O.10(1..*) Yes/No  

Additionally, overlaid on the table are small red circles highlighting Yes in row 3.5.2.1.3.6.1, Yes in row 3.5.2.1.3.6.2, No in row 3.5.2.1.3.6.3, No in row 3.5.2.1.3.6.4, No in row 3.5.2.1.3.6.5, and No in row 3.5.2.1.3.6.6.)

 

Slide 92:

Review Steps (Tailoring) to Select User Needs and Associated Requirements

Fill-in PRL with User Needs/Requirements

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide contains the following table with additional overlays as described below:

Protocol Requirements List (PRL)
User Need ID User Need FR ID Functional Requirement Conformance Support Additional Specifications
2.5.2 Manage Signal Operations M Yes  
2.5.2.1 Manage Signal Configuration M Yes  
2.5.2.1.1 Manage Controller Startup Functions M Yes  
  3.5.2.1.1.1.1 Configure Startup All-Red Flash Mode O Yes / No  
3.5.2.1.1.1.2 Configure Startup Flash Time M Yes  
3.5.2.1.1.1.3 Enable/Disable Automatic Pedestrian Clearance Setting M Yes  
3.5.2.1.1.2 Configure Backup Time M Yes  

Additionally, overlaid on the table are small red circles that highlight M and Yes in rows 2.5.2, 2.5.2.1, and 2.5.2.1.1, No in row 3.5.2.1.1.1.1, and finally M and Yes in the final three rows.)

In summary, the PRL has all the user needs and associated requirements in ONE place, together with a solid relationship.

 

Slide 93:

Review Steps (Tailoring) to Select User Needs and Associated Requirements

Extensions

 

Slide 94:

Discuss Example of Commonly Used ASC User Needs in a PRL

Procurement Contract Specifications

Hardware Specifications

Functional Req.

Performance Req.

Structural Req.

Electrical Req.

Environmental Req.

Software Specifications

Functional Req.

Performance. Req.

Communications Interface Specifications

Project PRL, Requirements Traceability Matrix, Testing Documentation

Contractual requirements during

System Development Testing

Deployment/Integration

Operations/Maintenance

Project Management

 

Slide 95:

Discuss Example of Commonly Used ASC User Needs in a PRL

Procurement Contract Specifications

This slide has a graphic of a contract specification.

 

Slide 96:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 97:

Question

Which of the following is a FALSE statement related to an ASC specification?

Answer Choices

  1. An ASC specification should include a project PRL
  2. Conformance requires satisfying all mandatory user needs
  3. Vendor must comply with the project PRL in the agency specification
  4. Compliance requires only satisfying the user needs in the standard and not the specification

 

Slide 98:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) An ASC specification should include a project PRL
True. The ASC specification should include a PRL to describe the interface.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Conformance requires satisfying all mandatory user needs
True. All mandatory user needs must be satisfied to claim conformance.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Vendor must comply with the project PRL in the agency specification.
True. The vendor should use the project PRL to indicate which requirements it will fulfill.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Compliance requires only satisfying mandatory user needs in the standard and the specification
Correct. The vendor must satisfy the mandatory user needs and all selected optional user needs in the specifications.

 

Slide 99:

Module Summary

 

Slide 100:

Next Course Modules:

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.A315b, Part 1 of 2:
Understanding Requirements for Actuated Traffic Signal Controllers (ASC) Based on NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

 

Slide 101:

Next Course Modules:

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.A315b, Part 2 of 2:
Understanding Requirements for Actuated Traffic Signal Controllers (ASC) Based on NTCIP 1202 v03 Standard

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.T315:
Applying Your Test Plan to the NTCIP 1202 v03 ASC Standard

 

Slide 102:

Thank you for completing this module.

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