Module 38 - CV262

CV262: Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) ITS Standards for Project Managers

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Slide 1:

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters. ITS Training Standards “WELCOME” slide, with reference to the U.S. Department of Transportation Office of Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

Slide 2:

Welcome

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters, photo of Kenneth Leonard, Director ITS Joint Program Office - Ken.Leonard@dot.gov - and on the bottom is a screeshot of the ITS JPO website - www.pcb.its.dot.gov

Ken Leonard, Director
ITS Joint Program Office

Ken.Leonard@dot.gov

www.pcb.its.dot.gov

Slide 3:

Module CV262:

Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) ITS Standards for Project Managers

This slide contains a graphic depicting connected vehicles driving along a freeway.

Updated November 2019

Slide 4:

Instructor

Photo of Kenneth Vaughn, P.E., President, Trevilon LLC

Kenneth Vaughn, P.E.

President

Trevilon LLC

Slide 5:

Learning Objectives

Slide 6:

Learning Objective 1

Describe the connected vehicle environment

Slide 7:

Illustrate the CV Environment

This slide has a graphic showing the high-level physical view as taken from the Architecture Reference for Cooperative and Intelligent Transportation (ARC-IT) website. This base graphic shows the major types of subsystems within the reference architecture: Center, Support, Field, Vehicle, and Traveler. It also shows the links that exist between them (which includes every possible combination, including self-referential links, other than Traveler-to-Traveler). The Vehicle-to-Vehicle link is labeled "V2V" and the Vehicle-to-Traveler link is labeled "V2P"; these two links are highlighted in green (after the first click) and indicated as being the topic of this module. The links between the Vehicle or Traveler and the other major subsystems are labeled "V2I", highlighted in blue (after the second click), and indicated to be the subject of Module CV261. After the third click, a red box encircles the Traveler to emphasize that this module covers travelers in addition to vehicles.

Slide 8:

Illustrate the CV Environment

The CV Environment

This slide has a part of an image from the USDOT website that depicts the three major components of the connected vehicle environment, namely the wirelessly connected vehicles, mobile devices, and infrastructure.

CV environment consists of:

CV Communications

Slide 9:

Illustrate the CV Environment

The CV Environment

This slide has the second part of the image from Slide #8 and depicts the three major benefits of the connected vehicle environment, namely safety, mobility, and environment benefits.

Goals

Slide 10:

Illustrate the CV Environment

The CV Environment

Cooperative ITS (C-ITS) vs. Traditional ITS

This slide includes a USDOT graphic of an intersection with several connected vehicles. It is intended to demonstrate that each connected vehicle is its own system, potentially operated and maintained by a different entity, yet all of these distinct systems need to interoperate in a system of systems.

Slide 11:

Illustrate the CV Environment

V2V vs V2I

V2V course (this course):

V2I course:

V2X is Vehicle-to-Anything

This slide includes a picture of an in-vehicle display that is warning the driver of an approaching emergency vehicle; this is one example of a vehicle-to-vehicle application.

Slide 12:

Illustrate the CV Environment

Vulnerable Road Users

This slide includes a graphic of two pedestrians crossing at a crosswalk with one of them holding a connected device (such as a smart phone) that is conveying information to a roadside device, which is forwarding the information to the vehicle and producing a pedestrian warning. This same type of service could be implemented directly if the smart device and vehicle operate on the same communications network.

Slide 13:

Identify V2V Services

V2V Services

V2V Basic Safety Service Use Cases

This slide contains a graphic that shows a top down view of a three-lane roadway, with two lanes moving left to right, and one lane moving right to left. This is an animated slide. First, the text "Do Not Pass Warning" appears above the roadway along with the depiction of two connected vehicles traveling from right left (in the only lane in that direction), and one connected vehicle traveling in the opposite direction in the inside lane. An arrow indicates the direction of travel for each lane. Second, the text "Lane Change Warning + Blind Spot Warning" appears below the roadway on the left. and another connected vehicle is depicted traveling from left to right in the outside lane, slightly ahead of the connected vehicle in the inside lane, so that the inside vehicle is in the outside vehicle's blind spot. Third, the text "Forward Collision Warning" appears below the roadway on the right along with two connected vehicles traveling left to right in the right lane, one immediately behind the other. The lead vehicle has its brake lights on. Fourth, the text "Emergency Electronic Brake Light" appears below the roadway in the middle along with a third connected vehicle in the right lane just behind the two vehicles associated with the Forward Collision Warning application.

Slide 14:

Identify V2V Services

V2V Services

V2V Basic Safety Service Use Cases

The slide contains a graphic that shows a top down view of an intersection. Each approach to the intersection has two lanes in each direction. This is an animated slide. First, the text "Intersection Movement Assist" appears at the left bottom corner of the intersection along with a connected vehicle traversing the intersection from left to right in the right lane. A second connected vehicle is travelling bottom to top, crossing the crosswalk and just about to enter the intersection in direct conflict with the first connected vehicle. Next, the text "Left Turn Assist" appears in the upper right corner of the intersection; along with a connected vehicle making a left turn from the left lane, moving left to right; another connected vehicle is traversing the intersection from the opposite direction.

Slide 15:

Identify V2V Services

V2V Services

V2V Safety Services

This slide has two graphics. The first indicates a line of three stopped cars with a fourth approaching. In front of the lead car is a downed tree. The lead car is transmitting messages back to the cars behind it. The second graphic indicates a work zone with workers and work vehicles with the vehicles transmitting information to each other.

Slide 16:

Identify V2V Services

V2V Services

V2V Mobility Services

V2V Environmental Services

This slide shows a freeway where the inside lane has been separated from the main lanes with the use of pylons. The vehicles traveling in the reserved, inside lane are all shown as being connected and in communication with each other on a green pathway that indicates that they are platooned together as a group.

Slide 17:

Identify V2V Services

Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) Safety

In 2017, a third of fatalities were vulnerable road users:

Author's relevant description: The first chart shows the proportion of fatalities inside and outside of a vehicle from 1975 through 2017. The proportion of fatalities outside of the vehicle varies from just under 30% from 1975 through the mid-1980s and then falling off to 20% from about 1996 through 2003. The proportion of fatalities outside of the vehicle then increases to just over 30% in 2012 where it seems to stabilize through 2017.

Increase since 2009 has been in those aged 20-69 (from 1.6 to 2.2 per 100,000)

Author's relevant description: The second figure chart has a title "2018 is projected to have the largest number of pedestrian fatalities in the U.S. since 1990." The chart shows pedestrian fatality numbers from 1990 through 2018. The 1990 data point is labeled as 6,482 and is followed by a steep decline such that in 1992 the number is roughly 5,500, where it stabilizes for about five years before falling again until it reaches a low of just more than 4,000 in 2009. The drop then quickly reverses and increases to a projected 6,227 in 2018.

Slide 18:

Identify V2V Services

V2P Mobility

Author's relevant description: This slide presents a graphic from USDOT's Accessible Transportation Technologies Research Initiative (ATTRI) program. It depicts a 5-step process around a center icon of a medical technician looking at a smart phone with the label "Caregiver, Family, and Safety Alerts. Connected Citizens. Associated Services." The five icons of the five step process include: a user booking a trip on a smart phone, a visually challenged individual at a transit stop being assisted by a robot, the same individual on a bus being alerted by his smart phone to pull the stop cord, the same traveler being guided when to cross the street by his smart phone, and arriving at his destination.

Source: Accessible Transportation Technologies Research Initiative (ATTRI)

Slide 19:

Societal Benefits of Connected Vehicles

This slide presents 9 icons, arranged in 3 rows by 3 columns, to explain the benefits of connected vehicles. The top row focuses on safety benefits and depicts a street view icon showing a person in a 360-degree circle symbolizing 360-degree visibility. The second is a warning sign with an exclamation point symbolizing that CVs identify hazards. The third is a vehicle with a collision symbol symbolizing that CVs reduce crashes. The second row focuses on mobility benefits and depicts a chart with a downward trend symbolizing that reduced crashes results in reduced congestion, the second icon on this row depicts a person in a wheelchair symbolizing how CVs increase mobility for those with disabilities, and the third icon shows a traffic signal head, which is used to symbolize smoother traffic flow. The third and final row indicates a truck, which is used to symbolize that reduced congestion results in reduced emissions; a thumbs-up sign, indicating that smoother traffic also reduces emissions, and finally two gears working symbolizing that improved efficiency of automated systems can also reduce emissions.

Slide 20:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

Slide 21:

Question

Which of the following does the USDOT NOT include in its list of benefits of connected vehicles?

Answer Choices

  1. Improved Safety
  2. Improved Environment
  3. Enhanced Entertainment
  4. Improved Mobility

Slide 22:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Improved Safety
Incorrect. The USDOT has identified that safety is the primary benefit provided by the connected vehicle environment.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Improved Environment
Incorrect. The USDOT has identified various environmental benefits of connected vehicle services.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Enhanced Entertainment
Correct! While connected vehicles may be able to deliver entertainment, this is not included in the USDOT list of benefits since it is not a matter of major public interest.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Improved Mobility
Incorrect. Mobility has also been identified as a benefit for connected vehicles.

Slide 23:

Learning Objective 2

Discuss V2V communications

Slide 24:

Identify the Components of the V2X Network

Components of a V2X Network

The slide fully consists of a graphic that shows the mobile components of a V2X network; It shows a vehicle and a smartphone as both containing the same basic components as detailed in an enlarged view. Within the enlarged view, there is a blue shaded box, with text at the bottom that says "On-Board Equipment (OBE): One or more integrated units". There are four white text boxes within the blue box. The upper left text box is entitled "V2X radios". The upper right box is entitled "GPS receiver". The bottom left box is entitled "Platform". The lower right box is entitled "On-board applications". There are two additional text boxes to the right of the blue box. The upper text box is entitled "Human interface". The lower text box is entitled "Internal device comms". There are arrows between the following text boxes: "GPS receiver" to "V2X radios," "GPS receiver" to "On-board applications," "On-board applications" to and from "V2X radios," "On-board applications" to and from "Platform," "On-board applications" to and from "Internal device comms," and "On-board applications" to "Human interface." Further, a bi-directional arrow flows from both "V2X radios" and "GPS receiver" to the text "Antenna" at the top of the blue box.

Supplement icon indicating items or information that are further explained/detailed in the Student Supplement.

Slide 25:

Describe the Information Exchange Requirements

This slide has one image for each item in the bullet list. The first bullet is a UML class diagram, which is used to describe the topic "data requirements." The second bullet is a Wi-Fi icon used to describe the topic "communication requirements." The third bullet is a security shield used to describe the topic "security requirements."

Slide 26:

Describe the Information Exchange Requirements

Crash Avoidance Metrics Partners (CAMP)

Vehicle-to-Vehicle Basic Safety

Information exchange requirements define:

Slide 27:

Describe the Information Exchange Requirements

Data Requirements: Answers "What"

Vehicle-to-Vehicle Basic Safety

Slide 28:

Describe the Information Exchange Requirements

Communication Requirements: Answers "What" and "When"

Vehicle-to-Vehicle Basic Safety

a target with a dart in its bulls eye relating to the slides bullet point on accuracy

a stopwatch, which relates to the slides bullet point on latency

Slide 29:

Communication Requirements

Communication Requirements: Answers "Who" and "Where"

Vehicle-to-Vehicle Basic Safety

Slide 30:

Communication Requirements

Key V2V Basic Safety Requirements

Slide 31:

Security Needs

Security Requirements

Slide 32:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

Slide 33:

Question

What data is NOT included as a Basic Safety requirement?

Answer Choices

  1. Location of vehicle
  2. Weight of vehicle
  3. Length of vehicle
  4. Steering wheel angle

Slide 34:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Location of vehicle
Incorrect. The location is used to determine how close the vehicle is.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) Weight of vehicle
Correct! The basic safety application is intended to avoid collisions and the weight of the other vehicle has not been deemed to be a significant factor in these calculations.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Length of vehicle
Incorrect. The length of the vehicle is used to determine the limits of the vehicle.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Steering wheel angle
Incorrect. The steering wheel angle can be used to identify when the vehicle is sliding.

Slide 35:

Learning Objective 3

Describe the roles of standards for V2V communications

Slide 36:

Summarize the Benefits of Standards

Standards are Essential!

1ISO/IEC/IEEE 24765:2017 Systems and Software Engineering - Vocabulary

Slide 37:

Summarize the Benefits of Standards

Benefits

The slide contains a graphic of two vehicles communicating via a lightning bolt.

Slide 38:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

ITS Station Architecture

This slide depicts the ITS Station Architecture with revisions from the HTG7 project. It shows the "Application Entity" as the top layer spanning three columns. The left column is a single piece labeled "Management Entity". The middle column is a stack of three layers. The top layer, just below the "Application Entity" is the "Facilities Layer." The next layer is the "Network and Transport (TransNet) Layer." The bottom layer is the "Access (SubNet) Layer." The right column is a single piece labeled "Security Entity." Each piece of the graphic is labeled in a separate color.

Source: ISO 21217:2019

Slide 39:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “Application Entity.”

Application Entity

SAE J2945 Family

Slide 40:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “Application Entity.”

Application Entity

V2V-related standards in SAE J2945 Family

* Recommended Practice

W Work in Progress

Slide 41:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “Facilities Layer.”

Facilities Layer

SAE J2735 (2016)

Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) Message Set Dictionary

e.g., Basic Safety Message (BSM)

Slide 42:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “Management Entity.”

Management Entity

Management

Slide 43:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “Security Entity.”

Security Entity

IEEE 1609.2 (2016 plus amendments)

Security Services for Applications and Management Messages

Slide 44:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “Security Entity.”

Security Entity

IEEE 1609.2.1 (WIP)

Certificate Management Interfaces for End-Entities

At the bottom of the slide a road is shown with a connected vehicle approaching from each direction labeled "A" and "B". After the first mouse click, a building labeled "SCMS" and is shown at the roadside along with arrows pointing to each of the two vehicles and showing security certificates being distributed to them according to IEEE 1609.2.1. After the next click, a bi-directional arrow shows that the two vehicles can now communicate by sharing their certificates. This arrow is labelled "Data sharing inside of trust domain". This figure is also supplemented with a note explaining that the "actual design is much more complex" than what is shown.

Slide 45:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “TransNet Layer.”

TransNet Layer

IEEE 1609.3 (2016)

Networking Services

Slide 46:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “SubNet Layer.”

SubNet Layer

FCC allocated 5.9 GHz spectrum in 1999 for:

non-voice radio techniques to transfer data over short distances between roadside and mobile radio units, between mobile units, and between portable and mobile units to perform operations related to the improvement of traffic flow, traffic safety and other intelligent transportation service applications in a variety of public and commercial environments. DSRC systems may also transmit status and instructional messages related to the units involved.

Source: Federal Communications Commission, Dedicated Short Range Communications of Intelligent Transportation Services - Final Rule, FR Doc No: 99-30591

Slide 47:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “SubNet Layer.”

SubNet Layer

IEEE 1609.4 (2016) Multi-channel Operation

Slide 48:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “SubNet Layer.”

SubNet Layer

3GPP

Cellular Data

The IEEE 802.11 Wi-Fi community has separately proposed to share the 5.9 GHz spectrum; this would intermix ITS and non-ITS uses

C-V2X has been chosen as the DSRC deployment technology in China

Slide 49:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper left corner of the slide, except that all of the pieces are in a dark grey, except for the “SubNet Layer.”

SubNet Layer

3GPP

Multiple releases; multiple bands

NOTE: First commercial products typically follow 1-2 years later

Slide 50:

Identify the Standards to Support V2V Communications

SubNet Layer

Current Situation

Recommendation:

Slide 51:

Testing and Conformance

Conformance Testing Program / Certification

Slide 52:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

Slide 53:

Question

Which of the following is NOT part of the ITS Station Architecture?

Answer Choices

  1. Application Entity
  2. Facilities Layer
  3. Security Entity
  4. Presentation Layer

Slide 54:

Review of Answers

A small version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the upper right corner of the slide

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Application Entity
Incorrect. The Application Entity sits at the top of the stack.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Facilities Layer
Incorrect. The Facilities Layer sits just below the Application Entity in the Data Plane.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Security Entity
Incorrect. The Security Entity is on the right side of the stack.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Presentation Layer
Correct! The Presentation Layer is a part of the Open Systems Interconnect Reference Model and is fully contained within the Facilities Layer of the ITS Station Architecture.

Slide 55:

Learning Objective 4

Address challenges in realizing a V2V environment

Slide 56:

Items Recently Addressed (2015-2019)

Completion of key standards

Revisions of other standards

Slide 57:

Remaining Challenges to Realize V2V

Technical Challenges

Institutional Challenges

Slide 58:

Describe Remaining Technical Challenges to Realize V2V

Access Layer Challenges

In the lower right of the slide is an image of a man rock climbing to demonstrate a major challenge

Slide 59:

Describe Remaining Technical Challenges to Realize V2V

Implementation Issues

Author's relevant description of this figure: The slide is supplemented with a chart on the right-hand side showing the average age of all light vehicles from 1995 to 2015 with the average age increasing from 8.5 to 11.5 years during that 20-year timeframe.

Slide 60:

Describe Remaining Technical Challenges to Realize V2V

Implementation Issues

Slide 61:

Describe Remaining Technical Challenges to Realize V2V

New Applications and Software Updates

The slide shows a cockpit within a vehicle with the center console display shows a cloud with a downward arrow indicating software being downloaded from the cloud into the vehicle.

Slide 62:

Describe Remaining Technical Challenges to Realize V2V

Standards Evolution

A version of the ITS Station Architecture graphic defined on Slide #38 is reproduced in the lower right of the slide.

Slide 63:

Describe Institutional Challenges

Data Ownership and Privacy

The slide shows the wall of a building with a 6 by 14 array of CCTV cameras pointing down at two women who are on the sidewalk looking back at the cameras.

Slide 64:

Describe Institutional Challenges

Testing and Certification

The word “TESTING” is shown as a three-dimensional object along with a magnifying glass.

Slide 65:

Describe Institutional Challenges

Security and Credentials Management System (SCMS)

Slide 66:

Describe Actions that Transportation Agencies Can Take

Deployment

Author's relevant description for this figure: The chart in the lower left is entitled "V2X equipped vehicles (global production)" and shows projected values for 2018 through 2024, with minimal values for both 2018 and 2019, roughly 1 million in 2020, just shy of 2 million in 2021, roughly 4 million in 2022, roughly 8 million in 2023, and between 11 and 12 million in 2024. Added to this chart are figures of the percent of global production with the values 1.5% in 2020, 2.5% in 2021, 6% in 2022, 10% in 2023, and 15% in 2024.

* Percent of annual global production

Author's relevant description for this figure: The second chart is similar to a bell curve but is labeled the "Innovation Adoption Lifecycle" and is divided into 5 parts. The left side of the curve is labeled "Innovators" and represents 2.5% of the whole. The next segment is labeled "Early Adopters" and represents the next 13.5%. The next segment is the "Early Majority" and represents 34%. These three categories jointly represent 50% and takes us to the peak of the bell curve. The next segment is labeled "Late Majority" and represents 34%. The final segment is labeled "Laggards" and represents 16%.

Slide 67:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

Slide 68:

Question

Which of the following has NOT been identified in this presentation as a V2V service that agencies might need to consider implementing?

Answer Choices

  1. Work zone warnings
  2. Fleet management
  3. Emergency vehicle warnings
  4. Slow vehicle warnings

Slide 69:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Work zone warnings
Incorrect. Agencies should consider equipping their work zone vehicles with technologies to alert motorists of their presence.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) Fleet management
Correct! While agencies may need to manage a fleet of vehicles, a V2V component of this was not identified in this presentation.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Emergency vehicle warnings
Incorrect. Agencies should consider equipping their emergency vehicles with technologies to alert motorists of their presence.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Slow vehicle warnings
Incorrect. Agencies should consider equipping their slow vehicles with technologies to alert motorists of their presence.

Slide 70:

Learning Objective

Describe the current status of connected vehicles

Slide 71:

Introduce Standards and Research Underway

Slide 72:

This slide contains a graphic with the word "Case Study" in large letters. A placeholder graphic of a traffic control center indicating that a real-world case study follows.

Slide 73:

Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployments

Pilot deployments identified and helped to address V2V challenges to kickstart the CV ecosystem, including the following:

Addressing these key issues will facilitate all future deployments

A USDOT-developed graphic is shown at the bottom of the display depicting the three Pilot CV deployments in Tampa, Florida; New York City, New York; and Wyoming.

Supplement icon indicating items or information that are further explained/detailed in the Student Supplement.

Slide 74:

List Resources for Further Reading and Information

Architecture Reference for Intelligent and Cooperative Transportation (ARC-IT)

Supplement icon indicating items or information that are further explained/detailed in the Student Supplement.

Slide 75:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

Slide 76:

Question

Which of the following is the USDOT currently testing in relation to communication technology alternatives offered by C-V2X and DSRC?

Answer Choices

  1. Access Layer
  2. TransNet Layer
  3. Facilities Layer
  4. Management entity

Slide 77:

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Access Layer
Correct! DSRC and C-V2X are competing Access Layer communication technologies.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) TransNet Layer
Incorrect. The TransNet Layer is defined by IEEE 1609.3.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Facilities Layer
Incorrect. The Facilities Layer is defined by SAE 2735.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Security Entity
Incorrect. The Security Entity is defined by IEEE 1609.2.

Slide 78:

Module Summary

Slide 79:

Connected Vehicle Modules

For Project Managers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 1. I101:
Using ITS Standards: An Overview

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 46. CV261:
Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) ITS for Project Managers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 38. CV262:
Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) ITS for Project Managers

More Detailed Connected Vehicle Modules

CV263: Roadside Equipment Requirements

CV265: Introduction to IEEE 1609 Family of Standards

CV273: Introduction to SPaT/MAP Messages

CSE201: Introduction to SCMS

Slide 80:

Thank you for completing this module. Feedback

Please use the Feedback link below to provide us with your thoughts and comments about the value of the training.

Thank you!

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