Module 62 - CV273

CV273: Introduction to SPaT / MAP Messages

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Slide 1:

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters. ITS Training Standards “WELCOME” slide, with reference to the U.S. Department of Transportation Office of Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

 

Slide 2:

Welcome

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters, photo of Kenneth Leonard, Director ITS Joint Program Office - Ken.Leonard@dot.gov - and on the bottom is a screeshot of the ITS JPO website - www.pcb.its.dot.gov

Ken Leonard, Director
ITS Joint Program Office

Ken.Leonard@dot.gov

www.pcb.its.dot.gov

 

Slide 3:

Module CV273:

Introduction to SPaT / MAP Messages

Title slide: This slide contains the title with a placeholder graphic of a vehicle wirelessly communicating with a traffic signal. There are three yellow rings around the traffic signal and three yellow rings around the vehicle, indicating wireless communication.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 4:

Instructor

Photo of Patrick Chan, P.E., Senior Technical Staff, Consensus Systems Technologies

Patrick Chan, P.E.
Senior Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies
Flushing, NY, U.S.A.

Co-Author:
Anu J. (AJ) Lahiri
Technical Staff
Consensus Systems Technologies

 

Slide 5:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 6:

Learning Objective 1

Describe the scope of SAE J2735 Standard

 

Slide 7:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in Particular V2I Environment Transportation Challenges

The slide entitled "What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in particular a V2I Environment", with the subtitle "Transportation Challenges" contains a graphic. The top row contains a gray box entitled "Safety" and stating "37,113 highway deaths in 2017" and "6,452,000 crashes in 2017" To the right of the gray box is a picture of a motor vehicle collision. To the left of the gray box is a circle that indicates a speed limit. The second row contains an orange circular icon showing a roadway with an upward facing arrow. To the right of the icon is a blue box entitled "Mobility" and stating "5.5 billion hours of travel delay" and "$166 billion cost of urban congestion." To the right of the blue box is a picture of a multilane freeway with traffic congestion in both directions. The third line contains a green circular icon with the recycling symbol, and two thirds of a car. To the right of the icon is a green box entitled "Environment," and stating "3.3 billion gallons of wasted fuel". To the right of the green box is a picture of a single line of cars in congestion, with heavy exhaust seen coming from each vehicle.

Source: US Department of Transportation, 2019 Urban Mobility Report, TTI

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 8:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in Particular a V2I Environment

The CV Environment

The slide entitled "What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in particular a V2I Environment", with the subtitle "The CV Environment" contains three graphics stacked on top of each other on the left side. On top is a graphic with three vehicles on the road each with three yellow rings around each vehicle indicating each vehicle is wirelessly communicating. At the bottom, text says "Wirelessly Connected Vehicles". Below is a second graphic that shows a pedestrian crosswalk looking at a phone that shows a walk sign, meaning it is okay to walk. At the bottom, text says "Mobile Devices". Below is a third graphic that shows a cellular tower and building. At the bottom, text says "Infrastructure".

Source: US Department of Transportation

CV environment consists of:

CV Communications

 

Slide 9:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in Particular a V2I Environment

The slide entitled "What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in particular a V2I Environment" - The slide fully consists of a graphic of a connected vehicle environment. There is a four-way intersection with two cars and a bus, each at a different intersection approaches with three yellow rings around each vehicle indicating wireless communication. There is a pedestrian at one corner with a mobile phone that is indicating when it is okay to walk. There is a traffic light shown at the top with four bi-directional arrows, each one connected to a vehicle as well as the pedestrian. Using animation, the text "Current position and sensor data" appears over the bi-directional arrow to the bus representing vehicles providing their current position and sensor data. Using animation, the text "Current position and sensor data" appears over the bi-directional arrow to the pedestrian, representing individuals providing their current position and sensor data via connected devices. Using animation, the text "infrastructure data" appears over the bi-directional arrow to a traffic pole and cabinet, representing the infrastructure providing infrastructure data.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 10:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in particular a V2I Environment

The slide entitled "What is a Connected Vehicle Environment, in particular a V2I Environment" - The slide fully consists of a graphic of a connected vehicle environment. There is a four-way intersection with three cars and a bus at different intersection approaches, each of which have three yellow rings to show they are wirelessly communicating. There is a beacon at one corner, as well as transponders in the crosswalk. There are three pedestrians shown in the crosswalk. There is a walk sign shown at the corner. One pedestrian is carrying a mobile phone that shows a walk sign meaning pedestrians can cross. There are arrows from the transponders in the crosswalk pointing towards the beacon at the corner. There is are arrows connecting the beacon at the corner to a vehicle waiting. There is a caution sign next to the vehicle that indicates that the driver is receiving a warning to be cautious and yield to the pedestrians in the crosswalk.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 11:

What is the Need for SPaT and MAP Information?

The slide entitled "What is the need for a SPaT and MAP information?", with the subtitle "Signal Phase and Timing (SPaT) data and MAP data" has a single graphic. The graphic shows a Traffic Management Center on the left side and a Traffic Signal Controller on the lower left side. In the center there is a Roadside Unit. Using animation, a red circle appears around an arrow that that says "SPaT data" from the Traffic Signal Controller to the Roadside Unit. Using animation a red circle appears around an arrow that that says "MAP data" from the Traffic Management Center to the Roadside Unit. Using animation, a red circle appears around an arrow flowing from the Roadside Unit that says "SPaT/MAP messages" to a pedestrian, a car, and a bicycle on the right side.

 

Slide 12:

What is the Need for SPaT and MAP Information?

The slide entitled "What is the need for a SPaT and MAP information?", with the subtitle "Signal Phase and Timing (SPaT) data are used by applications to generate", has a graphic on the right side. The graphic shows the view the interior of a vehicle through the windshield and a screen on the center console of the vehicle. The vehicle is approaching an intersection with red lights shown at the top. Wireless symbols are shown between the vehicle, indicating wireless communication is occurring, and a message appears on the center console saying "Stop Ahead" in response to the red traffic signal.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 13:

What is the Need for SPaT and MAP Information?

The slide entitled "What is the need for a SPaT and MAP information?", with the subtitle "MAP data can be used by applications to provide benefits at intersections or roadway segments", has a graphic on the right side. The graphic shows an aerial schematic of a four-way intersection. The main street is shown east-west and have four lanes-two in each direction and the side street is shown to have two lanes in the north-south directions. The lanes approaching the intersection from the east have straight arrows indicating that only thru traffic is permitted from those lanes. The leftmost lane approaching the intersection from the west had a left turn arrow meaning that only left turns are allowed from the lane while the rightmost lane from the west is a straight arrow. The two side streets have a straight arrow and right turn arrow on the approaches to the intersection, indicating thru or right turns are allowed.

 

Slide 14:

What is the Need for SPaT and MAP Information?

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 15:

What is the Scope and Purpose of SAE J2735?

Author's relevant description for this figure: This figure is for example purposes only: The slide entitled "What is the scope and purpose of SAE J2735", with the subtitle "A data dictionary for the CV environment", has a graphic on the right side. The graphic shows the title page of the SAE J2735_201603 standard.

Source: SAE International

 

Slide 16:

What is the Scope and Purpose of SAE J2735?

The slide entitled "What is the scope and purpose of SAE J2735", with the subtitle "Signal Phase and Timing SPaT", has a graphic on the right side. The graphic shows a screenshot of a mobile application. The application displays information for a driver in a vehicle approaching an intersection. The top of the screen shows the name of the application: "TravelSafely". Below is text identifying the driver's current location: "City of Anaheim". Below is text identifying the intersection that the driver is approaching: "Anaheim Blvd-Lincoln Ave". Below are large arrows. On the center right side, a green arrow is pointing up, indicating that thru traffic is currently permitted by the traffic signal. On the center left is a red left turn arrow, indicating that left turns are currently not permitted by the traffic signal. Below the red arrow is text that says "80+ Seconds to Green", indicating that it will more than 80 seconds until left turns at the intersection will be permitted. At the bottom are three buttons. The leftmost button shows a gear icon that may show application settings. The rightmost button shows a question mark that may show application tips. The center button shows a car.

Source: Applied Information

 

Slide 17:

What is the Scope and Purpose of SAE J2735?

The slide entitled "What is the scope and purpose of SAE J2735", with the subtitle "Signal Phase and Timing SPaT", has a graphic on the right side. The same graphic as Slide 13 is shown. The graphic shows an aerial schematic of a four-way intersection. The main street is shown east-west and have four lanes-two in each direction and the side street is shown to have two lanes in the north-south directions, one in each direction. The lanes approaching the intersection from the east have straight arrows indicating that only thru traffic is permitted from those lanes. The leftmost lane approaching the intersection from the west had a left turn arrow meaning that only left turns are allowed from the lane while the rightmost lane from the west is a straight arrow. The two side streets have a straight arrow and right turn arrow on the approaches to the intersection, indicating thru or right turns are allowed.

 

Slide 18:

What is the Scope and Purpose of SAE J2735?

The slide entitled "What is the scope and purpose of SAE J2735", with the subtitle "Signal Request/Signal Status Message (SRM/SSM)", has a graphic on the right side. The graphic shows a signalized intersection with two buses and a truck, each vehicle having three yellow rings around it to indicate wireless communication. Arrow flows are shown from a bus communicating with a beacon on the sidewalk. Arrow flows are shown pointing from the beacon to the intersection's traffic signal controller at the corner of the intersection. Finally, arrow flows are shown from the traffic signal controller to the traffic signal.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 19:

What is the Scope and Purpose of SAE J2735?

 

Slide 20:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 21:

Question

Which of the following user needs for a signalized intersection is NOT addressed with SPaT data?

Answer Choices

  1. Receive currently allowed vehicle movements
  2. Receive lane location descriptions
  3. Receive suggested vehicle speeds
  4. Receive estimated times when signal indications will change

 

Slide 22:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Receive currently allowed vehicle movements
Incorrect.
This information is supported by SPaT data

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) Receive lane location descriptions
Correct! Lane location descriptions are provided by MAP message data

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Receive suggested vehicle speeds
Incorrect. This information is supported by SPaT data

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Receive estimated times when signal indications will change
Incorrect. This information is supported by SPaT data

 

Slide 23:

Learning Objective

Describe the SPaT Message

 

Slide 24:

What is the Structure of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 25:

What is the Structure of the SPaT Message?

The slide entitled "What is the structure of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a graphic that shows the structure of a SPaT message. There are three levels shown, each named on the left. The top level is called message. The middle level is called Data Frames. The bottom level is called Data Elements. On the message level, there is a blue box representing a message labeled "MSG_SignalPhaseAndTiming". On the Data Frame level, there is green box representing a data frame labeled "intersections". There is a black line connecting the box to the message box indicating that this data frame is an attribute of the message. On the Data Element level, there are various labeled green and yellow boxes with black lines connecting to the intersections box, indicating that they are elements in the intersections data frame. Additionally, there are various labeled green and yellow boxes on the Data Element level with black lines connecting directly to the message box, indicating that there are elements of message not encompassed in the Data frame. Any green boxes are mandatory elements. Any yellow boxes are optional elements. Each box shows the name of what they hold in text.

 

Slide 26:

What is the Structure of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What is the structure of the SPaT message?" has a graphic showing a sample SPaT message. On top is a blue box labeled "MSG_SignalPhaseAndTiming" that represents the message. Below are five data concepts that are attributed to it. The first box is a green box labeled messageId. The next box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The next box is a yellow box labeled name. The next box is a green box labeled intersections. Under the intersections box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. The last box is a yellow box labeled regional. A legend appears on the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 27:

What is the Structure of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What is the structure of the SPaT message?" has a graphic showing a sample SPaT message. This is the same as Slide #26. On top is a blue box labeled "MSG_SignalPhaseAndTiming" that represents the message. Below are five data concepts that are attributed to it. The first box is a green box labeled messageId. The next box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The next box is a yellow box labeled name. The next box is a green box labeled intersections. Under the intersections box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. The last box is a yellow box labeled regional. A legend appears on the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 28:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What are the mandatory elements of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a graphic that shows the structure of intersections data frame. There are three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled intersections representing the intersections data frame. Under the intersections box is a note that says "1..32" indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. On the second level are 10 boxes with black lines connected to intersections box on the top level indicating that they are elements in intersections. The first box is a yellow box labeled name. The second box a green box labeled id. The third box is a green box labeled revision. The fourth box is a green box labeled status. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled moy. The sixth box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The seventh box is a yellow box labeled enabledLanes. The eighth box is a green box labeled states. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled maneuverAssistList. The tenth box is a yellow box labeled regional. On the third level are two boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled id on the second level indicating these two boxes are elements of the id data frame. The first box a yellow box labeled region. The next box is a green box labeled id. A legend appears on the left indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 29:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What are the mandatory elements of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a graphic that shows the structure of intersections data frame. This graphic is similar to the graphic on Slide #28 except there are only two levels of the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled intersections representing the intersections data frame. Under the intersections box is a note that says "1..32" indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. On the second level are 10 boxes with black lines connected to intersections box on the top level indicating that they are elements in intersections. The first box is a yellow box labeled name. The second box a green box labeled id. The third box is a green box labeled revision. The fourth box is a green box labeled status. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled moy. The sixth box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The seventh box is a yellow box labeled enabledLanes. The eighth box is a green box labeled states. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled maneuverAssistList. The tenth box is a yellow box labeled regional. A legend appears on the left indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 30:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 31:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What are the mandatory elements of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a graphic that shows the structure of intersections data frame. This graphic is similar to the graphic on Slide #28 for the first two levels. On the first level is a green box labeled intersections representing the intersections data frame. Under the intersections box is a note that says "1..32" indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. On the second level are 10 boxes with black lines connected to intersections box on the top level indicating that they are elements in intersections. The first box is a yellow box labeled name. The second box a green box labeled id. The third box is a green box labeled revision. The fourth box is a green box labeled status. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled moy. The sixth box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The seventh box is a yellow box labeled enabledLanes. The eighth box is a green box labeled states. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled maneuverAssistList. The tenth box is a yellow box labeled regional. On the third level are four boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled states indicating they are elements in the states data frame. The first box is a yellow box labeled movementName. The second box is a green box labeled signalGroup. The third box is a green box labeled state-time-speed. The last box is a yellow box labeled maneuverAssistList. A legend appears on the left indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 32:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What are the mandatory elements of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a graphic that shows the structure of states data frame. There are three levels shown. The first level shows four boxes. The first box is a yellow box labeled enabledLanes. The second box is a green box labeled states. The third box is a yellow box labeled maneuverAssistList. The last box is a yellow box labeled regional. Below the green box labeled states is text labeled 1..255 indicating that it is a data frame that represents data for 1 to 255 intersections. On the second level are four boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled states indicating they are elements in the states data frame. The first box is a yellow box labeled movementName. The second box is a green box labeled signalGroup. The third box is a green box labeled state-time-speed. The last box is a yellow box labeled maneuverAssistList. On the third level are four boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled state-time-speed. The first box is a green box labeled eventState. The second box is a yellow box labeled timing. The third box is a yellow box labeled speeds. The last box is a yellow box labeled regional. A legend appears on the left indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 33:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide titled "What are the mandatory elements of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a graphic that shows an aerial schematic four-way intersection. The main street traveling east-west is shown to have four lanes-two in each direction and the side street travelling north-south is shown to have two lanes, one in each direction. Each lane on the approaching the intersection has arrows indicating possible turns that are allowed from the lane. The lanes approaching from the west show a straight green arrow on the right lane that says "permissive" indicating a permissive thru movement from that lane. The left lane has a back left turn arrow that says "protected" indicating a protected left turn. All other lanes approaching the intersection has red arrows that say "stop and remain" indicating that movement from those lanes is not permitted. Using animation, a red circle surrounds the westbound permissive green through arrow. Then, a red circle surrounds the westbound protected left green arrow. Finally, a red circle surrounds each of the red arrows for all other movements at the intersection.

 

Slide 34:

What are the Mandatory Elements of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 35:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 36:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide entitled "What are the optional elements of the SPaT message?" contains a graphic on the left side. The graph shows a schematic of a road with three different lanes. The left most lane has dashed yellow lines on both sides indicating it's a reversible lane and has two yellow arrows, one pointing north and one pointing south, indicating travel in both directions are allowed (but not simultaneously). On top of the lane is number 201 indicating the lane identifier for travel in the northbound direction. At the bottom of the lane is number 211 indicating the lane identifier for travel in the southbound direction. The rightmost lane has dashed lines on the left side and a solid line on the right side indicating a sidewalk. There is a white arrow pointing north to indicate travel in the lane is in the northbound direction. On top of the lane, there is number 203 indicating the lane identifier for travel in the northbound direction. At the bottom is a bold P to indicate that the lane is used for parking. Below is the number 205 indicating the lane identifier when the lane it is used for parking. The middle lane has a white arrow pointing north to indicate the lane is used for traffic in the northbound direction. On top of the lane, there is number 202 indicating the lane identifier.

Lane 201, 203, 211, 205 are revocable lanes

 

Slide 37:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

Contains a graphic on the right side of a traffic light.

 

Slide 38:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 39:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

Please see Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant description for this figure: This slide entitled "What are the optional elements of the SPaT message?" fully consists of a chart that shows the values for the states data frame for the SPaT message for specific timepoints along the x-axis within a full signal cycle. At the top are two color bars (red, green, yellow) showing the signal indication for main street green and the cross street as time progresses through the cycle length. Below is text indicating timestamps at which data was recorded. Data was recorded at:

Below the time points is a chart with data values for each timestamp. The first row contains the timeStamp (in tenths of a second within the current hour) as it would appear in the SPaT message. Below this row is data values for each signal group - signalGroup 2 for main street and signalGroup 4 for the cross street. The following data is recorded:

)

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 40:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

Contains a graphic at the bottom with a sign that shows a recommended speed of 20 MPH

 

Slide 41:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

The slide entitled "What are the optional elements of the SPaT message?" contains a graphic on the right side showing an aerial view of an intersection with a westbound and northbound approach. The westbound approach is a four-lane road with two in each direction and the northbound approach is a two-lane road with one lane in each direction. Each lane has a number identifying the lane. There is a red turning arrow from the leftmost lane of the westbound approach to the northbound lane.

 

Slide 42:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 43:

What are the Optional Elements of the SPaT Message?

 

Slide 44:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 45:

Question

Signal timing information for how many intersections can be included in a single SPaT message?

Answer Choices

  1. Only one signalized intersection
  2. Only one signalized and one non-signalized intersection
  3. Up to two signalized intersections along an arterial
  4. Up to 32 signalized intersections

 

Slide 46:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Only one signalized intersection
Incorrect.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) One signalized and one non-signalized intersection
Incorrect.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Up to two signalized intersections along an arterial
Incorrect.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Up to 32 signalized intersections
Correct! A SPaT message can provide signal timing information for up to 32 signalized intersections

 

Slide 47:

Learning Objective 3

Describe the MAP message

 

Slide 48:

What is the Structure of the MAP Message?

 

Slide 49:

What is the Structure of the MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What is the structure of the MAP message" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the MAP message. There is a large blue box with text that says MSG_MapData representing the entire message. Below are nine boxes that represent elements of the MAP message. The first box is a green box labeled messageId. The second box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The third box is a green box labeled msgIssueRevision. The fourth box is a yellow box labeled layerType. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled layerId. The sixth box is a yellow box labeled intersections. The seventh box is a yellow box labeled roadSegments. The eighth box is a yellow box labeled dataParameters. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled restrictionList. A legend appears on the bottom left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 50:

What is the Structure of the MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What is the structure of the MAP message" has the same graphic in Slide #49 showing the structure of the MAP message. There is a large blue box with text that says MSG_MapData representing the entire message. Below are nine boxes that represent elements of the MAP message. The first box is a green box labeled messageId. The second box is a yellow box labeled timeStamp. The third box is a green box labeled msgIssueRevision. The fourth box is a yellow box labeled layerType. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled layerId. The sixth box is a yellow box labeled intersections. The seventh box is a yellow box labeled roadSegments. The eighth box is a yellow box labeled dataParameters. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled restrictionList. A legend appears on the bottom left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 51:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the intersections data frame. On top is a yellow box labeled intersections. Under the intersections box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. Below are nine boxes with black lines that connected to the intersections box, representing elements in the intersections data frame. The first box is a yellow box labeled name. The second box is a green box labeled id. The third box is a green box labeled revision. The fourth box is a green box labeled refPoint. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled laneWidth. The sixth box is yellow box labeled speedLimits. The seventh box is a green box labeled laneSet. The eighth box is a yellow box labeled preemptPriorityData. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled regional. A legend appears on the upper left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. On the right is a graphic of a sticky note that says "remember!" to emphasize that identifier (id) data frame consists of the identifier of the responsible agency (optional) and the regionally unique identifier of the intersection.

Remember icon. Used when referencing something already discussed in the module that is necessary to recount.

 

Slide 52:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the laneSet data frame. On top is a green box labeled laneSet. Under the laneSet box is a note that says 1..255 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 255 lanes. Below are nine boxes with black lines that are connected to the lane set data frame, indicating that they represent elements in the lane set data frame. The first box is a green box labeled laneId. The second box is a yellow box labeled name. The third box is a yellow box labeled ingressApproach. The fourth box is a yellow box labeled egressApproach. The fifth box is a green box labeled laneAttributes. The sixth box is yellow box labeled maneuvers. The seventh box is a green box labeled nodeList. The eighth box is a yellow box labeled connectsTo. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled overlays. A legend appears on the upper left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 53:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the laneAttributes data frame. On top is a green box labeled laneAttributes. Under the data frame is a note that says 1..255 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 255 lanes. Below are three green boxes with black lines that are connected to the lane attributes data frame, indicating each represent elements of the lane attributes data frame. The first box is labeled directionalUse. The second box is labeled shareWith and the last box is labeled laneType. A legend appears on the upper left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 54:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the laneSet data frame. This is the same graphic is on Slide #52 with an additional level. On top is a green box labeled laneSet. Under the laneSet box is a note that says 1..255 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 255 lanes. Below are nine boxes with black lines that are connected to the lane set data frame, indicating that they represent elements in the lane set data frame. The first box is a green box labeled laneId. The second box is a yellow box labeled name. The third box is a yellow box labeled ingressApproach. The fourth box is a yellow box labeled egressApproach. The fifth box is a green box labeled laneAttributes. The sixth box is yellow box labeled maneuvers. The seventh box is a green box labeled nodeList. The eighth box is a yellow box labeled connectsTo. The ninth box is a yellow box labeled overlays. A legend appears on the upper left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. The third level shows two green boxes with black lines connected to the nodeList box, indicating that they are elements in the node list data frame. The first box is labeled nodes and the second box is labeled computed.A legend appears on the upper left corner of the graphic indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 55:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the nodes data frame. On top is a green box labeled nodes. Below is a note that says 2..63 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for 2 to 63 node points. Below are two boxes with black lines connected to the nodes data frame indicating that that they are elements in the nodes data frame. The first box is a green box labeled delta. The second box is a yellow box labeled attributes. A legend appears on the left indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 56:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic that shows an example aerial view of an intersection in New York City. There is a one-way main street from right to left with a total of six lanes. There is a one-way side street going down with a total of three lanes. Each lane is indicated with an orange line and a number that represents the lane identifier. There are nodes visible at the start of each lane at the stopbar of the adjacent intersection to the stopbar of that lane at the intersection. In the center of the intersection is a blue bubble that represents the reference point. There is also a crosswalk at each side of the intersection. Each crosswalk is indicated with an orange line and a node. There also red squares on each side of the intersection, indicating the locations of stop bars. There is a blue pin is at the traffic pole at the upper right corner of the intersection that is used as a survey point used by a tool that can be used to check for positional accuracy.

Source: New York City Connected Vehicle Pilot

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 57:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide titled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message?" has a graphic at the top showing the structure of the computed data frame. There are two levels shown. The first level shows a green box that represents the computed lane data frame. The second level shows six boxes with black lines connected to the computed lane data frame, indicating that they are fields of the computed lane data frame. The first box is a green box labeled referencedLaneId. The second box is a green box labeled offsetXaxis. The third box is a green box labeled offsetYaxis. The fourth box is a yellow box labeled rotateXY. The fifth box is a yellow box labeled scaleXaxis. The last box is a yellow box labeled scaleYaxis. A legend appears on the left indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

 

Slide 58:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

The slide entitled "What are the mandatory elements of a MAP message" has a graphic that shows an example aerial view of an intersection in New York City. There is a one-way main street going down with a total of seven lanes approaching the intersection. The rightmost lane approaching the intersection is represented by a dark blue line, meaning it is the original referenced lane using node offsets. The other six lanes on the approach are represented with a light blue line, indicating they are computed lanes based on the original reference lane. There are six lines on the main street leaving the intersection. Each of them has is indicated with a gray line. There are pink lines along the sides of the intersection representing pedestrian crosswalks. The side street has one three lanes leaving the intersection, each of them indicated with a gray line. The other side has eight lanes approaching the intersection. Going against the direction of the main street, the first lane is represented with a dark blue line, indicating node offsets. The second lane is represented by a light blue line and is a computed lane based on the first lane. The third is shorter than the first and is represented with a dark blue line. The fourth lane is shorter than the third and is represented with a dark blue line. The fifth lane is represented with a light blue line and is computed based on the fourth line. The sixth lane is leaving the intersection and is indicated with a gray lane. The seventh lane is approaching the intersection and is indicated with a dark blue line. The eighth lane is represented by a light blue line and was computed based on the seventh lane. In the center of the intersection is an orange bubble that represents the reference point. Each lane is labeled with its lane identifier.

Source: New York City Connected Vehicle Pilot

Example icon. Can be real-world (case study), hypothetical, a sample of a table, etc.

 

Slide 59:

What are the Mandatory Elements of a MAP Message?

 

Slide 60:

What are the Optional Elements of a MAP Message?

 

Slide 61:

What are the Optional Elements of a MAP Message?

 

Slide 62:

What are the Optional Elements of a MAP Message?

 

Slide 63:

What are the Optional Elements of a MAP Message?

 

Slide 64:

What are the Optional Elements of a MAP Message?

 

Slide 65:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 66:

Question

Which of the following attributes for a lane is included in a MAP message?

Answer Choices

  1. The centerline locations of a lane
  2. The permitted direction of travel of the lane
  3. The permitted vehicle types that may use the lane
  4. All of the above

 

Slide 67:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) The centerline locations of a lane
True. Nodes are used to define the centerline of a lane.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) The permitted direction of travel of the lane
True. The permitted direction of travel of the lane may be provided in a MAP message.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) The permitted vehicle types that may use the lane
True. Vehicle class restrictions may be included in a MAP message.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All of the above
Correct! All of the above are true.

 

Slide 68:

Learning Objective 4

Implementation Considerations

 

Slide 69:

ISO TS 19091

 

Slide 70:

ISO TS 19091

 

Slide 71:

ISO TS 19091

Supplement icon indicating items or information that are further explained/detailed in the Student Supplement.

 

Slide 72:

ISO TS 19091

 

Slide 73:

ISO TS 19091

 

Slide 74:

SAE J2945/x Family of Standards

 

Slide 75:

SAE J2945/x Family of Standards

 

Slide 76:

SAE J2945/x Family of Standards

 

Slide 77:

NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 78:

NTCIP 1202 v03

The slide entitled "NTCIP 1202 v03" fully consists of a graphic. On top is an icon of a laptop labeled "Maintenance Laptop". To the left of the Maintenance Laptop is an icon of a desktop computer labeled "Traffic Management System". To the left of the Traffic Management System is an icon of a server labeled "Connected Vehicle Back Office Systems". There is a solid, bi-directional arrow between the Connected Vehicle Back Office Systems and the Traffic Management System. Below the is a box representing the Roadside Unit. There is a solid, bi-directional arrow between the Connected Vehicle Back Office Systems and the Roadside Unit. To the right of the Roadside Unit is a box representing the Controller Unit. To the right of the Controller Unit is a box representing Cabinet Subsystems. There is a solid, bi-directional arrow between the Controller Unit and the Cabinet Subsystems. The Roadside Unit is connected to the Controller Unit, Maintenance Laptop, and the Traffic Management System with dotted red lines. Additionally, the Controller Unit is directly connected to the Traffic Management System and the Maintenance Laptop with red dashed lines. Below is an icon of a modem labeled "DSRC modem". There is a solid, bi-directional arrow labeled "SAE J2735 + Modem Control" between the Roadside Unit and the DSRC Modem. At the bottom are various icons including of a car, a truck, a bus, a firetruck, a bicycle, a pedestrian with a mobile device, CCTV camera with loop detectors labelled "Vehicle Detection Subsystems", and a traffic signal with a pedestrian walk sign. The DSRC modem is connected to the car, the truck, the bus, the firetruck, the bicycle, and the pedestrian with purple dashed lines. The cabinet subsystem is connected to the truck, the bus, the firetruck, the bicycle, the pedestrian, the Vehicle Detection Subsystems, and the traffic signal with solid black lines. Communications from the truck are labelled "Freight Priority Requests". Communications from the bus are labelled "Transit Priority Requests". Communications from the firetruck are labelled "Preemption Requests". Red dashed lines represent communications subject to NTCIP 1202 or other NTCIP standards. Purple dashed lines represent communications of the DSRC interface. Solid black lines are other communications of other standards or proprietary.

 

Slide 79:

NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 80:

NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 81:

NTCIP 1202 v03

 

Slide 82:

How to Specify SPaT Messages

 

Slide 83:

How to Specify SPaT Messages

 

Slide 84:

How to Specify SPaT Messages

 

Slide 85:

How to Specify MAP Messages

 

Slide 86:

How to Specify MAP Messages

 

Slide 87:

How to Specify MAP Messages

 

Slide 88:

How to Specify MAP Messages

The slide entitled "How to specify MAP messages" has a graphic on the right showing a screenshot of the USDOT J2735 MAP tool. The screenshot shows an aerial view of a neighborhood with apartment buildings and streets. On the upper right is a menu where there are options to toggle view of Lanes, Approaches, and Reference Point. Additionally, there is an option to toggle lane widths. On the left is a placeholder graphic of a gear with a wrench, indicating that the slide is about a tool.

Tools/Applications icon. An industry-specific item a person would use to accomplish a specific task, and applying that tool to fit your need.

 

Slide 89:

Additional References

Tools/Applications icon. An industry-specific item a person would use to accomplish a specific task, and applying that tool to fit your need.

 

Slide 90:

This slide contains a graphic with the word "Case Study" in large letters. A placeholder graphic of a traffic control center indicating that a real-world case study follows.

 

Slide 91:

Case Study: City of Anaheim

 

Slide 92:

Case Study: City of Anaheim

 

Slide 93:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 94:

Question

When broadcasting SPaT and MAP messages, which of the following issues must be considered?

Answer Choices

  1. Only one intersection is contained in each SPaT and MAP message
  2. All MAP messages must be accompanied by a SPaT message
  3. Other standards may limit the number of bytes in a message
  4. SPaT and MAP messages must use the same broadcast rate

 

Slide 95:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Only one intersection is contained in each SPaT and MAP message
Incorrect. Each SPaT and MAP message may describe up to 32 intersections

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) All MAP messages must be accompanied by a SPaT message
Incorrect. However, SPaT messages should be accompanied by a MAP message

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Other standards may limit the number of bytes in a message
Correct! Other standards may impose message size limitations

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) SPaT and MAP messages must use the same broadcast rate
Incorrect. For example, SPaT messages are dynamic and may need to be broadcasted more frequently

 

Slide 96:

Module Summary

 

Slide 97:

Thank you for completing this module.

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