Transit Module 24: Transit Signal Priority in Connected Vehicle Environment

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Slide 1:

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters. ITS Training Standards “WELCOME” slide, with reference to the U.S. Department of Transportation Office of Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

 

Slide 2:

This slide contains a graphic with the word “Welcome” in large letters, photo of Kenneth Leonard, Director ITS Joint Program Office - Ken.Leonard@dot.gov - and on the bottom is a screeshot of the ITS JPO website - www.pcb.its.dot.gov

 

Slide 3:

Module 24:

Transit Signal Priority in Connected Vehicle Environment

Title slide: This slide contains the title with a placeholder graphic of an intersection. The graphic shows a signalized intersection with two buses and a truck, each vehicle having three yellow rings around it to indicate wireless communication. Arrow flows are shown from a bus communicating with a beacon on the sidewalk. Arrow flows are shown pointing from the beacon to the intersection's traffic signal controller at the corner of the intersection. Finally, arrow flows are shown from the traffic signal controller to the traffic signal.

 

Slide 4:

Instructor

Photo of Patrick Chan, P.E., Senior Technical Staff, Consensus Systems Technologies

Patrick Chan, P.E.

Senior Technical Staff

Consensus Systems Technologies

(ConSysTec)

 

Slide 5:

Learning Objectives

 

Slide 6:

Learning Objective 1

 

Slide 7:

Describe how transit signal priority may be provided in a connected vehicle environment

 

Slide 8:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment?

Transportation Challenges

The slide entitled "What is a Connected Vehicle Environment", with the subtitle "Transportation Challenges" contains a graphic. The top row contains a gray box entitled "Safety" and stating "37,113 highway deaths in 2017" and "6,452,000 crashes in 2017" To the right of the gray box is a picture of a motor vehicle collision. To the left of the gray box is a circle that indicates a speed limit. The second row contains an orange circular icon showing a roadway with an upward facing arrow. To the right of the icon is a blue box entitled "Mobility" and stating "5.5 billion hours of travel delay" and "$166 billion cost of urban congestion." To the right of the blue box is a picture of a multilane freeway with traffic congestion in both directions. The third line contains a green circular icon with the recycling symbol, and two thirds of a car. To the right of the icon is a green box entitled "Environment," and stating "3.3 billion gallons of wasted fuel." To the right of the green box is a picture of a single line of cars in congestion, with heavy exhaust seen coming from each vehicle.

Source: US Department of Transportation, 2019 Urban Mobility Report, TTI

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 9:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment

The CV Environment

The slide entitled "What is a Connected Vehicle Environment", with the subtitle "The CV Environment" contains three graphics stacked on top of each other on the left side. On top is a graphic with three vehicles on the road each with three yellow rings around each vehicle indicating each vehicle is wirelessly communicating. At the bottom, text says "Wirelessly Connected Vehicles." Below is a second graphic that shows a pedestrian crosswalk looking at a phone that shows a walk sign, meaning it is okay to walk. At the bottom, text says "Mobile Devices." Below is a third graphic that shows a cellular tower and building. At the bottom, text says "Infrastructure."

Source: US Department of Transportation

CV environment consists of:

CV Communications

 

Slide 10:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment?

The slide fully consists of a graphic of a connected vehicle environment. There is a four-way intersection with two cars and a bus, each at a different intersection approaches with three yellow rings around each vehicle indicating wireless communication. There is a pedestrian at one corner with a mobile phone that is indicating when it is okay to walk. There is a traffic light shown at the top with four bi-directional arrows, each one connected to a vehicle as well as the pedestrian. Using animation, the text "Current position and sensor data" appears over the bi-directional arrow to the bus representing vehicles providing their current position and sensor data. Using animation, the text "Current position and sensor data" appears over the bi-directional arrow to the pedestrian, representing individuals providing their current position and sensor data via connected devices. Using animation, the text "infrastructure data" appears over the bi-directional arrow to a traffic pole and cabinet, representing the infrastructure providing infrastructure data.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 11:

What is a Connected Vehicle Environment?

The slide fully consists of a graphic of a connected vehicle environment. There is a four-way intersection with three cars and a bus at different intersection approaches, each of which have three yellow rings to show they are wirelessly communicating. There is a beacon at one corner, as well as transponders in the crosswalk. There are three pedestrians shown in the crosswalk. There is a walk sign shown at the corner. One pedestrian is carrying a mobile phone that shows a walk sign meaning pedestrians can cross. There are arrows from the transponders in the crosswalk pointing towards the beacon at the corner. There is are arrows connecting the beacon at the corner to a vehicle waiting. There is a caution sign next to the vehicle that indicates that the driver is receiving a warning to be cautious and yield to the pedestrians in the crosswalk.

Source: US Department of Transportation

 

Slide 12:

Transit Signal Priority

An operational strategy that provides preferential treatment (priority) to facilitate the movement of transit vehicles through signalized intersections

Signal Priority applications can apply for emergency and freight vehicles also

 

Slide 13:

How Transit Signal Priority (TSP) is Currently Implemented

Current Systems

Optical Systems

There is a graphic at the bottom of the slide describing how Optical Systems communicate with traffic signals. There is a transit bus labeled "Optical Emitter" traveling toward a traffic signal on a pole. At the bottom of the pole is a box labeled "Controller Cabinet." There is a box at the top of the pole labeled "Optical Receiver." There are graphics to indicate communication between the transit bus and the Optical Receiver.

 

Slide 14:

How Transit Signal Priority (TSP) is Currently Implemented

Current Systems

Optical Systems - Limitations:

 

Slide 15:

Role of NTCIP 1211 in Transit Signal Priority (TSP)

NTCIP 1211

An information content standard that defines aspects of a communications interface standard for a Signal Control Priority (SCP) system.

Author's relevant description: On the right side of the slide, there is a graphic of the cover page of the NTCIP 1211 v02 standard.

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 16:

How Transit Signal Priority (TSP) is Currently Implemented

NTCIP 1211

Background information icon indicates general knowledge that is available elsewhere and is outside the module being presented.

 

Slide 17:

What Information is Exchanged for TSP in a Connected Vehicle Environment

Vehicle to Infrastructure

Priority Requests

There is a diagram of Vehicle to Infrastructure communication using the example of roadside units (RSUs). There is legend at the top that indicates boxes consisting of dashed lines represent Physical Components and blue boxes indicate Logical Components. The diagram consists of two physical components, labeled "Vehicle" and "Infrastructure." Within the Vehicle component, there is a logical component labeled, "Priority Request Generator (PRG)" sending priority request to a physical component labeled, "On Board Unit (OBU)." This On Board Unit is sending priority request to another physical component labeled "Roadside Unit (RSU)" within the Infrastructure component. Within the Infrastructure component, the RSU priority requests to a logical component labeled, "Priority Request Server (PRS), who sends priority status back to the RSU who sends priority status to the OBU within the Vehicle component. The PRS also sends service requests to another logical component labeled, "Coordinator (CO)."

 

Slide 18:

What information is Exchanged for TSP in a Connected Vehicle Environment

Vehicle to Infrastructure

Vehicle Information

The graphic on this slide is a photo of a transit bus driving at night.

 

Slide 19:

What Information is Exchanged for TSP in a Connected Vehicle Environment

Infrastructure to Vehicle

Priority Status

The graphic from slide #17 is used again here. There is a diagram of Vehicle to Infrastructure communication using the example of roadside units (RSUs). There is legend at the top that indicates boxes consisting of dashed lines represent Physical Components and blue boxes indicate Logical Components. The diagram consists of two physical components, labeled "Vehicle" and "Infrastructure." Within the Vehicle component, there is a logical component labeled, "Priority Request Generator (PRG)" sending priority request to a physical component labeled, "On Board Unit (OBU)." This On Board Unit is sending priority request to another physical component labeled "Roadside Unit (RSU)" within the Infrastructure component. Within the Infrastructure component, the RSU priority requests to a logical component labeled, "Priority Request Server (PRS)," who sends priority status back to the RSU who sends priority status to the OBU within the Vehicle component. The PRS also sends service requests to another logical component labeled, "Coordinator (CO)."

 

Slide 20:

What Information is Exchanged for TSP in a Connected Vehicle Environment?

Infrastructure to Vehicle

 

Slide 21:

Potential Advantages of a CV Implementation over Traditional TSP Implementations

 

Slide 22:

Potential Advantages of a CV Implementation over Traditional TSP Implementations

 

Slide 23:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 24:

Question

What is a disadvantage of using a traditional optical TSP system?

Answer Choices

  1. Special equipment is required for each intersection
  2. Line of sight is required
  3. Limited amount of information can be transferred
  4. All of the above

 

Slide 25:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Special equipment required for each intersection
Incorrect. Optical equipment is required on each intersection and vehicle.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Line of sight is required
Incorrect. The required line of sight has a relatively high possibility of being obstructed.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Limited amount of information can be transferred
Incorrect. Relatively little information about the vehicle can be obtained.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All of the above
Correct! All of the above are disadvantages.

 

Slide 26:

Learning Objective

 

Slide 27:

TSP Standards in a Connected Vehicle Environment

 

Slide 28:

Relevant Standards and the Maturity of the Standards

SAE J2735 Standard

Author's relevant description: The graphic shows the title page of the SAE J2735_201603 standard.

 

Slide 29:

Relevant Standards and the Maturity of the Standards

SAE J2735 Standard

A graphic that shows the structure of a signal request message. There are three levels shown, each named on the left. The top level is called message (sentence). The middle level is called Data Frames (phrases). The bottom level is called Data Elements (words). On the message level, there is a blue box representing a message labeled "MSG_SignalRequestMessage." On the Data Frame level, there is green box representing a data frame labeled "requests." There is a black line connecting the box to the message box indicating that this data frame is an attribute of the message. On the Data Element level, there are various labeled green and yellow boxes with black lines connecting to the requests box, indicating that they are elements in the requests data frame. Additionally, there are various labeled green and yellow boxes on the Data Element level with black lines connecting directly to the message box, indicating that there are elements of message not encompassed in the Data frame. Any green boxes are mandatory elements. Any yellow boxes are optional elements. Each box shows the name of what they hold in text.

 

Slide 30:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

There is a graphic at the bottom of the slide of two logical components, each depicted by a box, exchanging messages. The component on the left is labeled, "On Board Unit (OBU)" and the component on the right is labeled, "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

 

Slide 31:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from the previous slide (slide #30). It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

Graphical depiction of an SRM message. On top is a blue box labeled "MSG_SignalRequestMessage" that represents the message. Below are seven data concepts that are attributed to it. The first box is a green box labeled "messageId" (this text is red). The next box is a yellow box labeled "timestamp." The next box is a green box labeled "second." The next box is a yellow box labeled "sequenceNumber." The next box is a yellow box labeled "requests." The next box is a green box labeled "requestor." The next box is a yellow box labeled "regional." Under the sequenceNumber box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. A legend appears on the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements.

messageId. DE_DSRCmsgID = 14

timestamp. Number of elapsed minutes in the year

second. Number of milliseconds within the minute

sequenceNumber. Message counter

requests. Data for the priority request (up to 32)

requestor. Data about the requesting vehicle

regional. Regional extensions

 

Slide 32:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is graphic depicting the structure of an SRM message. There are three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a yellow box labeled "requests" representing the requests data frame. Under the requests box is a note that says "1..32" indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. On the second level are 4 boxes with black lines connected to requests box on the top level indicating that they are elements in requests. The first box is a green box labeled "requests." The second box a yellow box labeled "minute." The third box is a yellow box labeled "second." The fourth box is a yellow box labeled "duration" On the third level are 5 boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled "requests" on the second level indicating these two boxes are elements of the requests data frame. The first box a green box labeled "id" (this text is red). The next box is a green box labeled "requestID." The next box is a green box labeled "requestType." The next box is a green box labeled "inboundLane." The next box is a yellow box labeled "outboundLane."

 

Slide 33:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is graphic depicting the structure of an SRM message. This is the same graphic in the previous slide (Slide #32), which is a graphic depicting the structure of an SRM message. There are three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a yellow box labeled "requests" representing the requests data frame. Under the requests box is a note that says "1..32" indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. On the second level are 4 boxes with black lines connected to requests box on the top level indicating that they are elements in requests. The first box is a green box labeled "requests." The second box a yellow box labeled "minute" (this text is red). The third box is a yellow box labeled "second." The fourth box is a yellow box labeled "duration." On the third level are 5 boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled "requests" on the second level indicating these two boxes are elements of the requests data frame. The first box a green box labeled "id." The next box is a green box labeled "requestID." The next box is a green box labeled "requestType." The next box is a green box labeled "inboundLane." The next box is a yellow box labeled "outboundLane."

 

Slide 34:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is graphic depicting the structure of an SRM message. This is the same graphic in the previous slides (Slides #32 and #33), which is a graphic depicting the structure of an SRM message. There are three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a yellow box labeled "requests" representing the requests data frame. Under the requests box is a note that says "1..32" indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. On the second level are 4 boxes with black lines connected to requests box on the top level indicating that they are elements in requests. The first box is a green box labeled "requests." The second box a yellow box labeled "minute." The third box is a yellow box labeled "second." The fourth box is a yellow box labeled "duration" (this text is red). On the third level are 5 boxes with black lines connected to the green box labeled "requests" on the second level indicating these two boxes are elements of the requests data frame. The first box a green box labeled "id." The next box is a green box labeled "requestID." The next box is a green box labeled "requestType." The next box is a green box labeled "inboundLane." The next box is a yellow box labeled "outboundLane."

 

Slide 35:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is graphic depicting the structure of an SRM message. There is a graphic of an SRM Message, with two levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled "requestor" representing the requestor data frame. The second level consists of 9 boxes with black lines connected to the requestor box on the top level indicating that they are elements of the requestor data frame. The first box is green and labeled "id" (this text in red). The boxes following the first are all yellow and are labeled in the following order: type, position, name, routeName, transitStatus, transitOccupancy, transitSchedule, regional.

 

Slide 36:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is a graphic of an SRM Message, with three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled "requestor" representing the requestor data frame. The second level consists of 9 boxes with black lines connected to the requestor box on the top level indicating that they are elements of the requestor data frame. The first box is green and labeled "id." The boxes following the first are all yellow and are labeled in the following order: type, position, name, routeName, transitStatus, transitOccupancy, transitSchedule, regional. The third level consist of 3 yellow boxes with black lines connected to the position box in the second level indicating that they are elements of the position data frame. The first box is labeled "position" (this text is red). The second box is labeled "heading", and the third is labeled "speed."

 

Slide 37:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. This is the same graphic in a previous slide (Slides #35), which is a graphic of an SRM Message, with two levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled "requestor" representing the requestor data frame. The second level consists of 9 boxes with black lines connected to the requestor box on the top level indicating that they are elements of the requestor data frame. The first box is green and labeled "id." The boxes following the first are all yellow and are labeled in the following order: type, position, name, routeName, transitStatus (this text is red), transitOccupancy, transitSchedule, regional.

 

Slide 38:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

Mandatory Elements

Request for Service

 

Slide 39:

SAE J2735

Signal Request Message (SRM)

Graphic from slide #30. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a red arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a black arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

Example

  1. A transit vehicle enters DSRC range and approaches two signalized intersections
  2. The transit vehicle wirelessly broadcasts a SRM, with its ETA and the identifier of the lanes to enter and egress at both intersections
  3. The RSU for at both intersections receives the SRM and relays the request to the PRS, which processes the request.

There is a graphic of two four-way intersections at the bottom of the slide. Each intersection has a graphic of a traffic signal at its center. The left-most intersection has two connected boxes to its right, labeled RSU and OBU. The right-most intersection also has two connected boxes to its right, labeled RSU and OBU. A transit bus is approaching this intersection from the right. A blue box indicates that two requests are being sent (one for each intersection). There are blue numbers indicating the steps of the requests. Step #1: A transit vehicle enters DSRC range and approaches two signalized intersections. Step #2: The transit vehicle wirelessly broadcasts an SRM, with its ETA and the identifier of the lanes to enter and egress at both intersections. Step #3: The RSUs at both intersections receives the SRM and relays the request to each PRS, which processes the request.

 

Slide 40:

SAE J2735

Signal Status Message (SSM)

There is a graphic that depicts two logical components, each depicted in a box labeled, "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "RoadSide Unit (RSU)." There is a black arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a red arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

 

Slide 41:

SAE J2735

Signal Status Message (SSM)

Same graphic from slide #40. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a black arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a red arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is a graphical depiction of an SRM message. On top is a blue box labeled "MSG_SignalStatusMessage" that represents the message. Below are 6 data concepts that are attributed to it. The first box is a green box labeled "messageId" (this text is red). The next box is a yellow box labeled "timeStamp." The next box is a green box labeled "second." The next box is a yellow box labeled "sequenceNumber." The next box is a green box labeled "status." The next box is a yellow box labeled "regional." Under the status box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections.

 

Slide 42:

SAE J2735

Signal Status Message (SSM)

Same graphic from slide #40. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a black arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a red arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is a graphic of an SSM Message, with three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled "status" representing the status data frame. Under the status box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. The second level consists of 4 boxes with black lines connected to the status box in the top level indicating that they are elements of the status data frame. The first box is green and labeled "sequenceNumber" (this text is red). The second box is green and labeled "id." The third box is green and labeled "sigStatus." Beneath this, a note says 1..32 indicating that this is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. The next box is yellow and labeled "regional." The third level consists of 8 boxes with black lines connected to the sigStatus box in the second level to indicate that they are elements of the sigStatus data frame. The first box is yellow and labeled "requester." The next box is green and labeled "inboundOn." The next box is yellow and labeled "outboundOn." The next box is yellow and labeled "minute." The next box is yellow and labeled "second." The next box is yellow and labeled "duration." The next box is green and labeled "status." The next box is yellow and labeled "regional."

 

Slide 43:

SAE J2735

Signal Status Message (SSM)

Same graphic from slide #40. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a black arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a red arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. This is the same graphic as the previous slide (Slide #42) and is a graphic of an SSM Message, with three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled "status" representing the status data frame. Under the status box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. The second level consists of 4 boxes with black lines connected to the status box in the top level indicating that they are elements of the status data frame. The first box is green and labeled "sequenceNumber." The second box is green and labeled "id." The third box is green and labeled "sigStatus." The next box is yellow and labeled "regional." The third level consists of 8 boxes with black lines connected to the sigStatus box in the second level to indicate that they are elements of the sigStatus data frame. The first box is yellow and labeled "requester." The next box is green and labeled "inboundOn." The next box is yellow and labeled "outboundOn." The next box is yellow and labeled "minute." The next box is yellow and labeled "second." The next box is yellow and labeled "duration." The next box is green and labeled "status" (this text is red). The next box is yellow and labeled "regional."

 

Slide 44:

SAE J2735

Signal Status Message (SSM)

Same graphic from slide #40. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)." There is a black arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a red arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. This is the same graphic as the previous slides (Slides #42 and #43) and is a graphic of an SSM Message, with three levels to the structure of the data. On the first level is a green box labeled "status" representing the status data frame. Under the status box is a note that says 1..32 indicating that it is a data frame that holds data for up to 32 intersections. The second level consists of 4 boxes with black lines connected to the status box in the top level indicating that they are elements of the status data frame. The first box is green and labeled "sequenceNumber." The second box is green and labeled "id." The third box is green and labeled "sigStatus." The next box is yellow and labeled "regional." The third level consists of 8 boxes with black lines connected to the sigStatus box in the second level to indicate that they are elements of the sigStatus data frame. The first box is yellow and labeled "requester." The next box is green and labeled "inboundOn." The next box is yellow and labeled "outboundOn" (this text is red). The next box is yellow and labeled "minute." The next box is yellow and labeled "second." The next box is yellow and labeled "duration." The next box is green and labeled "status." The next box is yellow and labeled "regional."

 

Slide 45:

SAE J2735

Signal Status Message (SSM)

Same graphic from slide #40. It depicts two logical components, labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" and "Road Side Unit (RSU)."  There is a black arrow labeled SRM from the On Board Unit to the Roadside Unit, and a red arrow labeled SSM from the RoadSide Unit to the On Board Unit.

Example

  1. A RSU receives two SRM requests and the PRS processes the request
  2. The signal controller provides the PRS with the status of the requests, then the PRS generates a SSM that is broadcasted by the RSU with the status of all SRM requests received.
  3. Transit vehicles receive the SSM and travel through the signalized intersection when service is provided.

There is a graphic of a four-way intersection at the bottom of the slide. At the center of the intersection is a graphic of a traffic signal. There are two transit buses approaching the intersection, from the left and from the right. There are two boxes representing a PRS and an RSU to the right of the intersection. There are blue numbers indicating the steps of sending and receiving SSMs in the intersection. Step #1: An RSU receives two SRM requests and the PRS processes the request (one from each bus approaching the intersection). Step #2: The signal controller provides the PRS with the status of the requests, then the PRS generates an SSM that is broadcasted by the RSU with the status of all SRM requests received. Step #3: The transit vehicles receive the SSM and travel through the signalized intersection when service is provided.

 

Slide 46:

SAE J2735

Basic Safety Message (BSM)

A graphic that depicts one logical component, depicted in a box labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)", sending a BSM represented as a red arrow to another logical component on the right is labeled, "OBU/RSU."

 

Slide 47:

SAE J2735

Basic Safety Message (BSM)

The graphic in slide #46 depicting a logical component labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" sending a BSM to a logical component on the right labeled "OBU/RSU."

A legend appears to the right indicating green boxes are mandatory elements and yellow boxes are optional elements. There is a graphical depiction of an BSM message. On top is a blue box labeled "MSG_BasicSafetyMessage" that represents the message. Below are 3 data concepts that are attributed to it. The first box is a green box labeled "coreData." The next box is a yellow box labeled "Part II." The next box is a yellow box labeled "regional."

 

Slide 48:

SAE J2735

Basic Safety Message (BSM)

The graphic in slide #46 depicting a logical component labeled "On Board Unit (OBU)" sending a BSM to a logical component on the right labeled "OBU/RSU."

Example

  1. A transit vehicle enters DSRC range and approaches two signalized intersections, while wirelessly broadcasting BSMs
  2. The RSU receives and processes the BSM information to determine its location, vehicle type and service permissions
  3. If the transit vehicle satisfies the established criteria for signal priority, the RSU sends a priority request to the priority request server (PRS)

There is a graphic of a four-way intersection at the bottom of the slide. At the center of the intersection is a graphic of a traffic signal. There are two transit buses approaching the intersection, from the left and from the right. There are two boxes representing a PRS and an RSU to the right of the intersection. There are blue numbers indicating the steps of sending and receiving SSMs in the intersection. Step #1: A transit vehicle enters the DSRC range and approaches two signalized intersections, while wirelessly broadcasting BSMs. Step #2: The RSU receives and processes the BSM information to determine its location, vehicle type and service permissions. Step #3: If the transit vehicle satisfies the established criteria for signal priority, the RSU sends a priority request to the PRS.

 

Slide 49:

IEEE

IEEE 1609.2

 

Slide 50:

IEEE

Service Specific Permissions (SSP)

 

Slide 51:

Early Adoption of the Standards

 

Slide 52:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 53:

Question

What is a mandatory element of the SRM? Answer Choices

  1. Request Identifier
  2. Requestor Identifier
  3. SequenceNumber (message counter)
  4. Estimated time of arrival

 

Slide 54:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Request Identifier
Incorrect. A request identifier is not mandatory unless a specific request is made

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) Requestor Identifier
Correct! The identifier of the requestor must be included in all Signal Request Messages

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) SequenceNumber (message counter)
Incorrect. The message counter is optional.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Estimated Time of Arrival
Incorrect. The estimated time of arrival of the requestor is optional.

 

Slide 55:

Learning Objective 3

 

Slide 56:

What Agencies Need to do to Prepare for CV TSP Implementation

 

Slide 57:

Roles and Responsibilities of the Traffic and Transit Agencies

Transit Agencies

 

Slide 58:

Roles and Responsibilities of the Traffic and Transit Agencies

Traffic Agencies

 

Slide 59:

Physical Architecture

NTCIP 1211

This slide is entitled, "Physical Architecture" with the subtitle, "NTCIP 1211." There is a graphic of a typical physical architecture for TSP implementations. There is a legend defining a solid line is indicative of the NTCIP 1211 standard, a dotted line is indicative of the TCIP standard, and a dashed line is indicative of other standards. The diagram consists of three boxes, made up of smaller boxes. One large box, labeled "Traffic Cabinet" has two smaller boxes inside of it: Receiver and Traffic Signal Controller. The Traffic Signal Controller box has three smaller boxes to represent its components labeled Priority Request Generator, Coordinator, and Priority Request Server. Within the Traffic Cabinet, the Receiver and the Priority Request Generator are communicating according to "Other Standards." The Receiver is also communicating with a component of another larger box labeled "Fleet Vehicle." There is one component within the Fleet Vehicle box labeled "Transmitter", which is communicating with the Receiver according to "Other Standards." The third large box is labeled "Traffic Management Center." It has one component labeled "Management Station." This Management Station is communicating with the Coordinator and Priority Request Server components within the Traffic Cabinet according to the NTCIP 1211 standard.

 

Slide 60:

Physical Architecture

Connected Vehicle Environment

 

Slide 61:

Physical Architecture

SRM / SSM

 

Slide 62:

Physical Architecture

SRM / SSM

This slide is entitled, "Physical Architecture" with the subtitle "SRM/SSM." There are two graphics showing different potential alternate physical architecture in a Connected Vehicle environment. The first diagram depicts the PRG as either part of the vehicle on-board system or a separate device on-board the vehicle. The PRG then uses NTCIP 1211 to send the priority request to the OBU, which then translates the data into an SAE J2735 SRM message. On the right, the RSU receives the SRM message, translates it back to NTCIP 1211, then forwards it to the PRS. The PRS is somewhere in the traffic signal cabinet and then uses NTCIP 1211 to forward a service request to the CO, which is the traffic signal controller. In the second diagram the PRG application is located within the OBU. It then generates the SRM message and transmits it through the OBU to the RSU. The RSU receives the SRM, translates it to NTCIP 1211, which is then transmitted to PRS, which is part of the traffic signal controller. Since the CO logical entity is also part of the traffic signal controller, the interface between the PRS and the CO is integral to the controller and thus can be proprietary.

 

Slide 63:

Physical Architecture

BSM

There is a graphic of an alternate configuration of a Transit Signal Priority environment. In this configuration, the OBU is a part of the vehicle on-board system or a separate device on-board the vehicle. The OBU transmits an SAE J2735 BSM to the RSU within the Traffic Signal Cabinet. The RSU sends this BSM to the Priority Request Generator (blue box), which transmits to the Priority Request Server (blue box), which transmits to the Coordinator (blue box) within the Controller (all of these components operating within the Traffic Signal Cabinet). There is a legend indicating that a blue box represents a logical component and a dashed box represents a physical component.

 

Slide 64:

Physical Architecture

BSM

There is a graphic of another alternate configuration of a Transit Signal Priority environment. In this configuration, the OBU is a part of the vehicle on-board system or a separate device on-board the vehicle. The OBU transmits an SAE J2735 BSM to the RSU within the Traffic Signal Cabinet. The RSU sends this BSM to the Priority Request Generator (blue box), which converts to BSM to the NTCIP 1211 standard and transmits it to the Priority Request Server (blue box), which transmits to the Coordinator (blue box) within the Controller (all of these components operating within the Traffic Signal Cabinet). There is a legend indicating that a blue box represents a logical component and a dashed box represents a physical component.

 

Slide 65:

Additional Deployment Guidance

Vehicle Type/Class

There are three graphics at the bottom of the slide. The first graphic is a photo of a transit bus stopped at a railroad crossing. The second graphic is a photo of an ambulance approaching a signalized intersection. The third graphic is a photo of a transit bus passing through a signalized intersection.

 

Slide 66:

Additional Deployment Guidance

Check In / Check Out

Check In

Check Out

 

Slide 67:

Additional Deployment Guidance

Nearside / Farside

Nearside

 

Slide 68:

Additional Deployment Guidance

Nearside / Farside

Nearside

Farside

This slide is entitled, "Additional Deployment Guidance" with the subtitle, "Nearside/Farside." There is a graphic of a four-way intersection. At the center of the intersection is a graphic of a traffic signal. There are dashed, black lines indicating the lanes of the road. There are yellow lines indicating the nearside of the distinction between the direction of traffic. There is a yellow, rectangular box representative of a transit bus heading stopped at a stop bar on the left side of the diagram heading towards the right side.

 

Slide 69:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 70:

Question

Where would a PRS NOT likely to be located? Answer Choices

  1. A transit vehicle
  2. A traffic management center
  3. A traffic signal controller cabinet
  4. A traffic signal controller

 

Slide 71:

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) A transit vehicle
Correct! A PRS is not likely to be found aboard a transit vehicle

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) A traffic management center
Incorrect. The functions of the PRS may be performed at a centralized server at a traffic management center.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) A traffic signal controller cabinet
Incorrect. A PRS could be a physical device in the cabinet.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) A traffic signal controller
Incorrect. The functions of the PRS may be performed by the traffic signal controller

 

Slide 72:

Learning Objective 4

 

Slide 73:

This slide contains a graphic with the word "Case Study" in large letters. A placeholder graphic of a traffic control center indicating that a real-world case study follows.

 

Slide 74:

Implementation Considerations

Case Studies

 

Slide 75:

Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems (MMITSS)

Introduction

 

Slide 76:

Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems (MMITSS)

System Architecture

This slide is entitled, "Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems (MMITSS)" with the subtitle, "System Architecture." There is a graphic of a context diagram representative of the system architecture for MMITSS. From left to right, there are two orange boxes labeled "Nomadic Traveler Server" and "MMTISS Central System" which are both communicating with a box labeled "MMITSS Roadside Processor." The Nomadic Traveler System is in communication with a box labeled "Nomadic Device." The Nomadic Device is communicating with the RSE Radio as well as a grey box labeled "Equipped Traveler." The Equipped Traveler is communicating with another grey box "Unequipped Traveler" and both of these boxes are communicating with "Non-motorized Traveler" which is communicating with the "Field Sensor/Detector." The RSE Radio and MMITSS Roadside Processor are circled in red to indicate they are a part of signal timing. The RSE Radio communicates with a box labeled "OBE" and the MMITSS Roadside Processor. There is a box labeled "MAP" also communicating with the MMITSS Roadside Processor. The MMITSS Roadside Processor is communicating with a box labeled "Traffic Signal Controller", which is communicating back to the Field Sensor/Detector. Two boxes labeled, "Traffic Management System" and "Fleet Management System" are communicating with the Traffic Signal Controller. These boxes are also communicating with a grey box labeled "Motorized Vehicle", which is communicating with the Field Sensor/Detector. The Motorized Vehicle is receiving information from "Unequipped Vehicle" and "Equipped Vehicle" on the right-hand side. These vehicles are also communicating with the OBE. The OBE and Equipped Vehicle are circled in red to indicate they are also a part of signal timing. Between the two red circles, are two arrows indicating the transmission of messages. The RSE Radio and MMITSS Roadside Processor are transmitting SSM to and receiving SRM from the OBE and Equipped Vehicle.

 

Slide 77:

Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems (MMITSS)

Lessons Learned

 

Slide 78:

Tampa Hillsborough Expressway Authority (THEA) Connected Vehicle Pilot

Introduction

 

Slide 79:

Tampa Hillsborough Expressway Authority (THEA) Connected Vehicle Pilot

System Architecture

This slide is entitled, "Tampa Hillsborough Expressway Authority (THEA) Connected Vehicle Pilot" with the subtitle, "System Architecture." There is a graphic of a Connected Vehicle project that took place in Tampa, Florida. On the left-hand side there is a graphic of traffic signal labeled "Priority by Controller" with a yellow rectangle beneath it that reads "Traffic Signal Controller receives green extension, sends green extended." This traffic signal sends 1211 Status (Green Extended) and receives 1211 Priority (Extend Green) from a yellow rectangle labeled "RSU 19-32." Text beneath the label reads "TSP app receives priority request, sends to Master Server, receives priority granted, send green extension to signal controller, sends priority granted to Bus." A blue rectangle labeled "TMC" is beneath the RSU and sends Priority Denied and Priority Granted to the RSU. It receives Priority Request from the RSU. Text within the TMC rectangle reads, "Master Server TSP app receives priority request, determines schedules, if behind sends priority request." To the right of the RSU box is a grey box that reads, "Bus A makes a priority request, receives priority." There are arrows from the RSU to the "Bus A" indicating that the RSU is sending SSM Priority Granted Denied and Priority Timeout, while receiving SRM Priority Request. There are two graphics of a bus beneath the "Bus A" rectangle. Bus A is sending Priority Denied/Timeout Notification to one bus. Bus A is sending Priority Granted Notification to another bus that has a green "GRANTED" sign on its dashboard.

Source: https://www.its.dot.gov/pilots/pilots_thea.htm

 

Slide 80:

Salt Lake City, Utah

Introduction

 

Slide 81:

Salt Lake City, Utah

System Architecture

This slide is entitled, "Salt Lake City, Utah" with the subtitle, "System Architecture." There is a graphic depicting the system architecture configuration in Salt Lake City, Utah of a bus, roadside equipment, and traffic signal transmitting and receiving SRMs, SSMs, and BSMs. The components of the bus include the Mobile Data Computer (MDC), On-board Processor (OBP), and On0board Unit (OBU). The MDC is receiving the schedule from the Utah Transit Authority Server. The MDC transmits location, on-time status, and occupancy to the Utah Transit Authority Server. The MDC also transmits the on-time status and percent occupancy to the OBP, which transmits it to the OBU. The OBU sends a Basic Safety Message (BSM) and a Signal Request Message (SRM) to components of the Roadside Equipment. The Roadside Equipment consists of a Roadside Unit (RSU) and a Roadside Processor (RSP). The RSU receives BSMs and SRMs and transmits them to the RSP. The RSP sends NTCIP Commands to the Signal Controller within the Traffic Signal. The RSP also sends BSMs, SRMs, and SSMs to the Utah DOT Server. The Signal Controller within the Traffic Signal returns SPaT and TSP Confirmation back to the RSP, who transmits to the RSU, and finally back to the OBU in the form of an SRM. The OBU transmits to the OBP.

Source: Utah DOT

 

Slide 82:

Salt Lake City, Utah

Lessons Learned

 

Slide 83:

SANDAG Bus On Shoulders

Introduction

 

Slide 84:

SANDAG Bus On Shoulders

Concept

This slide is entitled, "SANDAG Bus On Shoulders" with the subtitle "Concept." There is a graphic depicting the bus on shoulders concept at ramp meters. There is a bus on a shoulder next to a ramp where two passenger vehicles are stopped at a traffic signal. There are icons on the bus indicating that it is using GPS, a Processor, and a Wireless Communication Device to communicate with the nearby traffic signal. There are icons on the Controller Cabinet indicating that it is equipped with three processors, a Cellular Wireless Device, and a wired connection to the traffic signal. There is an icon on the traffic signal that indicating that it is equipped with a Wireless Communication Device that is communicating with the transit bus through a licensed secured wireless connection. The ramp meter is instructed to hold vehicles on the on-ramp until the transit vehicle clears the conflict/merge area.

Source: SANDAG

 

Slide 85:

SANDAG Bus On Shoulders

System Architecture

 

Slide 86:

Activity Placeholder: This slide has the word “Activity” in large letters at the top of the slide, with a graphic of a hand on a computer keyboard below it.

 

Slide 87:

Question

Which of the following is an important consideration when deploying TSP in a CV environment?

Answer Choices

  1. Security
  2. Physical architecture
  3. Criteria for granting priority requests
  4. All of the above

 

Slide 88:

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Security
Incorrect. Security is an important consideration for CV.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Physical architecture
Incorrect. The physical architecture is an important consideration for TSP system.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Criteria for granting priority requests
Incorrect. The criteria for granting priority requests is an important consideration for a TSP system.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All of the above
Correct! All of the above are important considerations for a TSP system in a CV environment.

 

Slide 89:

Module Summary

 

Slide 90:

We Have Now Completed the TSP Curriculum

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 8:
Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Understanding User Needs for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard - Part 1 of 2.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 9:
Arterial Management and Transit Signal Priority: Understanding User Needs for Signal Control Priority (SCP) Based on NTCIP 1211 Standard - Part 2 of 2

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 20:
Application of Arterial Management/Transit Signal Priority Standards

 

Slide 91:

Modules of Interest

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 11:
Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications and Future Platforms

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.Module 23:
Leveraging Communications Technologies for Transit On-Board Integration

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.CV273:
Introduction of SPaT / MAP Messages

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.CSE201:
Introduction to Security Credential Management System

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.CV265:
Introduction to IEEE 1609 Family of Standards for Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE)

 

Slide 92:

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