ITS Transit Standards Professional Capacity Building Program

Module 3: Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2: Introduction to the Standard and Transit Architectures

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Slide 1:

Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. A large dark blue rectangle with a wide, light grid pattern at the top half and bands of dark and lighter blue bands below. There is a white square ITS logo box with words "Standards ITS Training" in green and blue on the middle left side. The word "Welcome" in white is to the right of the logo. Under the logo box is the logo for the U.S. Department of Transpotation, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology.)

Slide 2:

Welcome slide with Mac Lister and screen capture of home webpage. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled "Mac Lister" has a photo of Mac Lister, Program Manager Knowledge and Technology Transfer, ITS Joint Program Office, on the left hand side, with his email address, Mac.Lister@dot.gov. A screen capture snapshot of the home webpage is found on the right hand side - for illustration only - from August 2014. Below this image is a link to the current website: www.pcb.its.dot.gov - this screen capture snapshot shows an example from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Development - Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office - ITS Professional Capacity Building Program/Advanced ITS Education. Below the main site banner, it shows the main navigation menu with the following items: About, ITS Training, Knowledge Exchange, Technology Transfer, ITS in Academics, and Media Library. Below the main navigation menu, the page shows various content of the website, including a graphic image of professionals seated in a room during a training program. A text overlay has the text Welcome to ITS Professional Capacity Building. Additional content on the page includes a box entitled What's New and a section labeled Free Training. Again, this image serves for illustration only. The current website link is: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov.)

Slide 3:

Welcome slide with Jeffrey Spencer and screen capture of home webpage. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled "Jeffrey Spencer" has a photo of Jeffrey Spencer, ITS Team Leader, Federal Transit Administration, Office of Research, Demonstration and Innovation, on the left hand side, with his email address, Jeffrey.Spencer@dot.gov. A screen capture snapshot of the home webpage is found on the right hand side - for illustration only - which is the same screen snapshot from Slide 2. Below this image and to the right is the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) logo.)

Slide 4:

ITS Transit Standards Professional Capacity Building Program

Module 3:

Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP), Part 1 of 2: Introduction to the Standard and Transit Architectures

Slide 5:

Acknowledgements

Slide 6:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 7:

Instructor

This slide, entitled Instructor has a photo of the instructor, Jerome Lutin, on the left hand side.

Jerome M. Lutin, Ph.D., P.E., AICP
Senior Director (Retired)
New Jersey Transit

South Brunswick, NJ, USA

Slide 8:

Target Audience

Slide 9:

Recommended Prerequisite(s)

Recommended Prerequisites(s) chart, four rows with four columns. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Recommended Prerequisites(s) chart Four rows with four columns. The first column is the Module title column; the corresponding rows in sequence are: Module 1, Module 2, and Module 5. The top tier of rows has three columns: Decision Maker, Project Manager, and Project Engineer. Modules 1 and 2 all have check marks in them, signifying that these modules should be taken as a prerequisite by the Decision Maker, Project Manager, and Project Engineer. Module 5 has "N/A" under the Decision Maker column, signifying that these modules are not applicable for the Decision Maker; and check marks for Project Manager and Project Engineer.)

Slide 10:

Curriculum Path (Decision-Maker)

A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Curriculum Path for Decision Maker A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and a flow chart showing the logical flow of the modules with the current module boxed in red. The first three boxes are green and aligned horizontally, green signifying "Recommended Pre-requisites." The first box is "Introduction to ITS Transit Standards, Module 1." Below that, connected by a line, is a box with the text "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2." Below that, connected by a line, is a box with the text, "TCIP, Part 1 of 2," which is outlined in red. From here, the lines branch out into three text boxes that are horizontally sequenced and are in blue, signifying "Optional Modules." These three boxes are: "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2", "Electronic Fare Payment Systems," and "Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms.")

Slide 11:

Curriculum Path (Project Manager)

A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Curriculum Path for Project Manager A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and a flow chart showing the logical flow of the modules with the current module boxed in red. The first three horizontally sequenced boxes are green. The first box is "Introduction to ITS Transit Standards, Module 1." Below that, connected by a line, is a box with the text "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2." To the right of this box, is "Transit Management, Part 2 of 2". Below that "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2", connected by a line, is a box with the text, "TCIP, Part 1 of 2," which is outlined in red. To the right of this box, is "TCIP, Part 2 of 2." From here, the lines branch out into four text boxes that are horizontally sequenced. The first two: "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2" and "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2" are green; the last two are "Electronic Fare Payment Systems" and "Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms." Below "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2," is the text box "Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2 coded in blue. Below "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2", is the text box "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 2 of 2, coded in blue.)

Slide 12:

Curriculum Path (Project Engineer)

A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Curriculum Path for Project Engineer A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and a flow chart showing the logical flow of the modules with the current module boxed in red. The first three horizontally sequenced boxes are green. The first box is "Introduction to ITS Transit Standards, Module 1." Below that, connected by a line, is a box with the text "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2." To the right of this box, is "Transit Management, Part 2 of 2". Below that "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2", connected by a line, is a box with the text, "TCIP, Part 1 of 2," which is outlined in red. To the right of this box, is "TCIP, Part 2 of 2." From here, the lines branch out into four text boxes that are horizontally sequenced. The first two: "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2" and "Arterial Management &Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2" are green; the last two are "Electronic Fare Payment Systems" and "Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms." Below "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2," is the text box "Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2 coded in green. Below "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2", is the text box "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 2 of 2, coded in green.)

Slide 13:

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the purpose and contents of the TCIP standard
  2. Recognize what is involved in growing traveler information and communication systems from basic systems to regional multi-modal applications
  3. Explain how TCIP is used to procure and implement transit ITS systems
  4. Illustrate the need for, and structure of, a transit agency architecture
  5. Articulate the fundamentals of exchanging information among transit business systems and devices using TCIP building blocks
  6. Summarize the content of the TCIP standard, tools, and available resources
  7. Provide examples of who is using TCIP

Slide 14:

Learning Objective #1: Describe the Purpose and Contents of the TCIP Standard

Slide 15:

Learning Objective #1

Requirements to Use Standards

Slide 16:

Learning Objective #1

TCIP* - Transit Communications Interface Profiles

Slide 17:

Learning Objective #1

Purpose of the TCIP Standard

Slide 18:

Learning Objective #1

History of the TCIP Standard

*Except the Fare Collection Business Area

Slide 19:

Learning Objective #1

TCIP Standard - Documents

TCIP has been published in four volumes.

Slide 20:

Learning Objective# 1

TCIP Standard - Documents

Slide 21:

Learning Objective #1

TCIP Standard - Documents

Slide 22:

Learning Objective #1

Normative and Non-Normative Content

Slide 23:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 24:

Learning Objective #1

What is the purpose of the TCIP standard?

Answer Choices

  1. Ensure that all transit agencies conform to the same requirements
  2. Federal requirement on uniformity for all procurements
  3. Exchange information for transit ITS systems and components
  4. TCIP is the only standard allowed for transit ITS systems

Slide 25:

Learning Objective #1

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Ensure that all transit agencies conform to same requirements
Incorrect. Agencies can develop their own requirements to meet their needs.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Federal requirement on uniformity for all procurements
Incorrect. TCIP use is voluntary. It is not required by the Federal government.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Exchange information for transit ITS systems and components
Correct! TCIP was developed specifically to meet the needs of the transit industry.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) TCIP is the only standard allowed for transit ITS systems
Incorrect. TCIP is only one of a number of standards that can be used.

Slide 26:

Learning Objective #1

What is the role of balloting in developing a standard?

Answer Choices

  1. To elect members to standards bodies
  2. Ensure that a consensus has been achieved on the standard
  3. Transit agencies' majority vote is needed to create a standard
  4. Ensures that Federal reps agree to require the standard

Slide 27:

Learning Objective #1

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) To elect members to standards bodies
Incorrect. Standards bodies are comprised of industry volunteers.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct. b) Ensure that a consensus has been achieved on the standard
Correct! Industry working groups use balloting to develop standards.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Transit agencies' majority vote is needed to create a standard
Incorrect. Standards are created by industry groups with a variety of stakeholders.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Ensures that Federal reps agree to require the standard
Incorrect. The Federal government does not require ITS standards by law.

Slide 28:

Summary of Learning Objective #1

Describe the Purpose and Contents of the TCIP Standards

Slide 29:

Learning Objective #2: Recognize What is involved in Growing Traveler Information and Communication Systems from Basic Systems to Regional Multi-Modal Applications

Slide 30:

Learning Objective #2

Planning for Communication Systems

Communications are Fundamental to Transit Management

Slide 31:

Learning Objective #2

Legacy Systems, Technological Change, and Obsolescence

Slide 32:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 33:

Learning Objective #2

Which factor is most likely to lead to changes in communication systems?

Answer Choices

  1. New technology becomes available
  2. Transit systems expand into new modes
  3. New management requirements increase information demand
  4. New transit vehicles require new radios

Slide 34:

Learning Objective #2

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) New technology becomes available
Incorrect. The availability of new technology does not mean your existing system will not continue to meet your needs.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Transit systems expand into new modes
Incorrect. Transit systems usually can add new vehicles and facilities without fundamental changes to their communication systems.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) New management requirements increase information demand
Correct! Transit managers are seeking new kinds of information and more data to better manage their systems.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) New transit vehicles require new radios
Incorrect. New vehicles may be configured to work with existing radios.

Slide 35:

Summary of Learning Objective #2

Recognize What is Involved in Growing Traveler Information and Communication Systems from Basic Systems to Regional Multi-Modal Applications

Slide 36:

Learning Objective #3: Explain How TCIP is Used to Procure and Implement Transit ITS Systems

Slide 37:

Learning Objective #3

Procurement and Implementation of Transit ITS Components

ITS Technology Applications

Slide 38:

Learning Objective #3

Procurement and Implementation of Transit ITS Components

TCIP Can Help Overcome the Following Technical Challenges

Slide 39:

Learning Objective #3

Procurement and Implementation of Transit ITS Components

TCIP Can Help Overcome the Following Technical Challenges (cont.)

Slide 40:

Learning Objective #3

Using TCIP to Facilitate Competitive Procurements

Slide 41:

Learning Objective #3

Using TCIP to Facilitate Competitive Procurements

TCIP Standard Approach

Slide 42:

Learning Objective #3

Using TCIP to Facilitate Competitive Procurements

TCIP Standard Approach

Slide 43:

Learning Objective #3

Using TCIP to Facilitate Competitive Procurements

This graphic illustrates how TCIP is used in agency procurements for ITS systems. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Using TCIP to facilitate competitive procurements This graphic illustrates how TCIP is used in agency procurements for ITS systems. TCIP comprises building blocks at several levels in conjunction with other ITS standards. It shows diagrammatically how TCIP and other requirements fit together within the framework of a Request for Proposal (RFP) which is the common procurement document used to solicit bids from contractors to supply ITS products. The Agency RFP is the top block in the graphic, and includes a block representing the Agency ITS Architecture. This is supported by blocks on the left, which include agency terms and conditions, systems and other ITS standards in use provide context for the procurement. On the right, TCIP building blocks create a specification for the actual information exchanges the agency wants to incorporate into the procurement to ensure that the required systems will be interoperable.)

This graphic illustrates how TCIP is used in agency procurements for ITS systems. TCIP comprises building blocks at several levels in conjunction with other ITS standards.

Slide 44:

Learning Objective #3

Integrating Systems using TCIP

TCIP Model for Data Exchange

This figure illustrates the TCIP model for data exchange. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Integrating systems using TCIP This figure illustrates the TCIP model for data exchange. Transit subsystems are represented by blocks on the right and on the left. Between the blocks arrows represent the flow of data between them over an arrow representing the communications link. TCIP dialogs and file transfers are represented by an oval sitting above the communications link showing messages encoded using TCIP exchange profiles.)

TCIP standard enables transit subsystems "A" and "B" to exchange information using TCIP exchange protocols.

Slide 45:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 46:

Learning Objective #3

Which is a key risk in transit ITS procurements?

Answer Choices

  1. Separately procured systems won't communicate
  2. Transit agencies may be overcharged for ITS systems
  3. Legacy systems do not have backups
  4. Standards are not available to integrate systems

Slide 47:

Learning Objective #3

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Separately procured systems won't communicate
Correct! Without use of common standards, systems developed by different vendors may not be able to communicate.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Transit agencies may be overcharged for ITS systems
Incorrect. Transit agencies can use low price as a way to evaluate bids to avoid overcharging.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Legacy systems do not have backups
Incorrect. A legacy system is typically defined as one that is outdated, but it may include backup features.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Standards are not available to integrate systems
Incorrect. There are a number of standards that may be used to integrate systems, including TCIP.

Slide 48:

Learning Objective #3

Which is a benefit of using TCIP in transit ITS procurements?

Answer Choices

  1. Standardize internal components of a vendor's ITS system
  2. Lower initial procurement costs
  3. Allow multiple vendors to compete
  4. Expand the bandwidth for communications between systems

Slide 49:

Learning Objective #3

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Standardize internal components of a vendor's ITS system
Incorrect. TCIP is intended to standardize only the interfaces between systems.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Lower initial procurement costs
Incorrect. In the long run, TCIP may help reduce costs, but there is no guarantee.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Allow multiple vendors to compete
Correct! TCIP is intended to allow many vendors to offer systems that can be integrated.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Expand the bandwidth for communications between systems
Incorrect. Bandwidth is communication system property. It is unaffected by TCIP.

Slide 50:

Summary of Learning Objective #3

Explain How TCIP is Used to Procure and Implement Transit ITS Systems

Slide 51:

Learning Objective #4: Illustrate the Need for, and Structure of, a Transit Agency Architecture

Slide 52:

Learning Objective #4

Capital and Project Planning for Transit ITS

Slide 53:

Learning Objective #4

Relationships Between ITS Architectures

Relationships Between ITS Architectures. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Relationships Between ITS Architectures - On the left, the National ITS Architecture, the generic starting point for a Regional ITS Architecture – Defines all the things a country "might" want to do. This points to the Regional ITS Architecture, on the right, which represents what organizations in a particular region "actually" want to do (an adaptation of the National ITS Architecture). TCIP Model Architecture on the left, is the generic starting point for a Transit Agency ITS Architecture – Defines a lot of things an agency "might" want to do. IT points to the Transit Agency ITS Architecture on the right, which is what an agency "actually" wants to do.)

Slide 54:

Learning Objective #4

What is the TCIP Model Architecture?

Slide 55:

Learning Objective #4

TCIP Model Architecture

The graphic on this slide illustrates the TCIP Model Architecture with various areas where subsystems are located and the communication links between subsystems. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: TCIP Model Architecture. The graphic on this slide illustrates the TCIP Model Architecture with various areas where subsystems are located and the communication links between subsystems. At the top is a box that includes External Business Systems. Immediately below that is a box that includes Transit Business Systems – These areas indicate systems that are located in an office and don't move around (e.g., Banks, Data Repositories, Transit Security, CAD/AVL). Below and to the right of the Transit Business Systems box is a box representing Transit Field Environment – This area indicates systems that are not in an office, but they don't move around either (e.g., bus stop, station, TVM, kiosk). Above and to the left of the Transit Business Systems box is a box for Non-Transit Field Environment – This area indicates systems that are not in an office, but they don't move around either AND they are not related to transit (specifically) (e.g., traffic lights). To the left of the Transit Business Systems box is a box representing the Travelers Below and to the left of the Transit Business Systems box which includes Mobiles/Portable Agency Environment – This area indicates systems that move (e.g., vehicles). Between each box is an narrow oval, like a sausage, that depicts the communications links among the various types of systems, including fixed-point communications between stationary elements and wireless communications to elements that move.)

Slide 56:

Learning Objective #4

Generic Transit Agency Architecture

This diagram uses the basic areas described in slide 60, for the TCIP Model Architecture and provides more detail. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Generic Transit Agency Architecture. Relevant author's notes: This diagram uses the basic areas described in slide 55, for the TCIP Model Architecture and provides more detail. It shows within each box a series of smaller boxes illustrating the plethora of business systems that could be included. For illustration only.)

Slide 57:

Learning Objective #4

What is a Transit Agency ITS Architecture?

Slide 58:

Learning Objective #4

Benefits of a Transit Agency ITS Architecture

Slide 59:

Learning Objective #4

Transit Core Business Processes

  1. Security and Incident Management Process
  2. Public Transit Vehicle (PTV) Operations Process
  3. Revenue and Fare Collection Process
  4. Scheduling Process
  5. Personnel and Work Assignment Management Process
  6. Asset Management Process
  7. Customer Information Process
  8. Data Repository Operations Process
  9. Spatial Data Management Process
  10. Transit Signal Priority Process

Slide 60:

Learning Objective #4

TCIP Concept of Operations

Slide 61:

Learning Objective #4

Example - Scheduling Process

Slide 62:

Learning Objective #4

TCIP Standard Volume I Section 5.5.4.3 -Distributing Scheduling Products

TCIP Standard Volume I Section 5.5.4.3 Distributing Scheduling Products. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: TCIP Standard Volume I Section 5.5.4.3 Distributing Scheduling Products. A Schedule Information Transfers to a Data Repository Based on Publish Dialogs. This figure is reproduced from TCIP Volume I. It shows a circle at the top representing a scheduling system with an arrow pointing down to a circle representing a Data Repository. The arrow represents data flow. A legend on the side shows the various types of data being published, including: Operator Assignments, Vehicle Assignments, Master Schedule Version, Block Schedule, Run Schedule, Route Schedule, Trip Detail, Pattern List, Timepoint List, Running Times, Calendar, and Roster.)

Slide 63:

Learning Objective #4

TCIP Standard Volume I Section 5.5.4.3 -

Distributing Scheduling Products (cont.)

Distributing Scheduling Products. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: TCIP Standard Volume I Section 5.5.4.3 Distributing Scheduling Products (continued) – This slide shows an oval in the center representing the data repository connected by arrows denoting data flows to eleven other ovals representing various business systems that need to receive scheduling products, including: Transit Security System, Garage Server, Geographic Information System, Traveler Information System, Customer Service System, Operator Assignment System, External Agency, Passenger Counting System, CAD/AVL System, Asset Management System, and other Authorized Business System.)

Slide 64:

This is a picture of a large room with multiple computer workstations with the text Case Study at the top.

Slide 65:

Learning Objective #4

Diagramming an Agency Architecture

This figure illustrates an agency architecture diagram showing a base year configuration of systems on the bus and in the management center. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Diagramming an agency architecture This figure illustrates an agency architecture diagram showing a base year configuration of systems on the bus and in the management center. Boxes represent various systems and lines with arrows show the data flows among the systems. A pick system*, a scheduling system and a bus manager system all interface with the agency database using TCP/IP internet type connections. On the bus, a head sign controller and the drive train computers operate independently. A Fare Mobile Data Terminal on the bus has a wired connection to the farebox computer. The farebox computer can exchange data with a central fare server at the garage using an infra-red connection. The agency has plans to add additional functionality in year 3 of their ITS capital program and how the architecture changes will be seen in the next slide. *A "pick" system is one that is used for drivers to choose work assignments. Some agencies refer to these systems as "sign-up" systems or use other names.)

Slide 66:

Learning Objective #4

Diagramming an Agency Architecture (cont.)

This slide is to be compared with the previous one to show the second stage of implementation for the agency's ITS architecture. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Diagramming an agency architecture (continued) Year 3 Architecture - This slide is to be compared with the previous one to show the second stage of implementation for the agency's ITS architecture. Boxes represent various systems and lines with arrows show the data flows among the systems. In year 3, the agency intends to add: an itinerary planner that directly feeds customers via the internet, an announcement recording studio system, an automatic vehicle stop annunciation system, a vehicle location system, and an automatic vehicle health monitoring system. These systems will require more integration with other systems and the architecture has added lines representing additional data communication flows. Data flows between the bus and the management center now will use wireless local area networks.)

Slide 67:

Learning Objective #4

Diagramming an Agency Architecture (cont.)

The year 5 architecture adds long range wireless data communications between the vehicle and the management center. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Diagramming an agency architecture (continued) - Year 5 Architecture The year 5 architecture adds long range wireless data communications between the vehicle and the management center. Additional boxes representing systems and lines representing data flows are added. On board the bus, the vehicle location system, which had been used in year 3 only to drive an automatic stop annunciator system, now has its location data sent via the stop annunciator to the vehicle logic unit, which allows the bus location to be transmitted back to a computer aided dispatch/automatic vehicle location (CAD/AVL) system. The CAD/AVL system now sends data to a Traveler Information System which in turn feeds data to Electronic Bus Stop Sign Displays.)

Slide 68:

Learning Objective #4

Architecture Implementation Process

Slide 69:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 70:

Learning Objective #4

Which answer best describes the use of an agency architecture to aid in capital and project planning?

Answer Choices

  1. Shows the buildings needed to house new systems
  2. Specifies the costs of systems for budgeting
  3. Must specify how vehicles communicate with control center
  4. Shows which systems need to interface with other systems

Slide 71:

Learning Objective #4

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Shows the buildings needed to house new systems
Incorrect. Architecture in this context applies to systems, not buildings.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect. b) Specifies the costs of systems for budgeting
Incorrect. The architecture can help budgeting, but it does not include costs.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect. c) Must specify how vehicles communicate with control center
Incorrect. An architecture could include vehicle-to-base communications, but that is not a requirement. The architecture could include only fixed facilities.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Shows which systems need to interface with other systems
Correct! The architecture explains how all systems are integrated and phased over time.

Slide 72:

Learning Objective #4

What are the key elements displayed in an architecture diagram?

Answer Choices

  1. All transit vehicles and fixed facilities in a system
  2. All business processes in agency concept of operations
  3. Only those components that are TCIP compliant
  4. Selected business systems and data flows

Slide 73:

Learning Objective #4

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect. a) All transit vehicles and fixed facilities in a system
Incorrect. The architecture should include representations of only those elements that are linked by communications and information flows.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect. b) All business processes in agency concept of operations
Incorrect. Only those business processes that exchange (or will exchange) information with other business processes need to be included in the architecture.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Only those components that are TCIP compliant
Incorrect. The architecture should include all components that exchange information, not just TCIP compliant ones.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Selected business systems and data flows
Correct! Architecture diagrams generally show selected systems and components as boxes or circles and data flows by lines.

Slide 74:

Learning Objective #4

Summary of Learning Objective #4

Illustrate the Need for, and Structure of, a Transit Agency Architecture

Slide 75:

Learning Objective #4

Summary of Learning Objective #4 (cont.)

Illustrate the Need for, and Structure of, a Transit Agency Architecture

Slide 76:

Learning Objective #5: Articulate the Fundamentals of Exchanging Information Among Transit Business Systems and Devices Using TCIP Building Blocks

Slide 77:

Learning Objective #5

File-Based Transfer

Transfer Data Without the Use of Dialogs in a Non-Real-Time Manner

Slide 78:

Learning Objective #5

Dialog-Based Transfer

Real-Time Transfer (Machine to Machine) Using Dialogs

Dialogs Specify:

Slide 79:

Learning Objective #5

Dialog-Based Transfer (cont.)

Real-Time Transfer (Machine to Machine) Using Dialogs

Dialogs do not define:

Slide 80:

Learning Objective #5

Dialog Patterns

The graphic shows the systems exchanging data as grey rectangles. The arrows illustrate the message flows in the dialog in time sequence starting at the top.

The graphic shows the systems exchanging data as grey rectangles on each side. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Dialog Patterns - The graphic shows the systems exchanging data as grey rectangles on each side. The system on the left is a data repository which is a subscriber. The system on the right is a Scheduling System, which is a publisher. Arrows between the grey rectangles, like tilted rungs on a ladder, illustrate the message flows in the dialog in time sequence starting at the top. Dialog patterns define a sequence of actions in a generic format that can be reused. This example shows the operation of the Publish Subscribe Dialog Pattern. The subscriber requests information (in this case the Timepoint List) using a Query Message (in this case SchTimepointListSub). In a normal execution, the publisher responds with the requested information (in this case a SchTimepointList message). Depending on the content of the query, there may be a single answer or an ongoing set of answers. An ongoing set of answers is appropriate when the requested information changes on an ongoing basis (e.g., vehicle location). In an abnormal execution, the subscriber requests the information and if the publisher determines the information is unavailable, then the subscriber is not authorized. As a result, the publisher returns an error message (CptSubErrorNotice).)

Slide 81:

Learning Objective #5

TCIP Building Blocks

Hierarchy to Help you Define Data

Slide 82:

Learning Objective #5

TCIP Building Blocks (cont.)

This graphic illustrates the distinction between what data is transferred, which is shown below the blue line; and how the data is transferred, which is shown above the blue line.

This figure shows a series of boxes arranged in a hierarchy below a line. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: TCIP Building Blocks - This figure shows a series of boxes arranged in a hierarchy below a line. The hierarchy starts with a box at the bottom representing data elements. This box is linked to boxes above it with arrows representing the buildup of higher levels of structure for data. These levels represent data frames and messages. These boxes represent what data is being transferred. The message box just below the line represents "messages" the highest level of the "what" that is being transferred. Above the line are boxes that represent how data is transferred. Messages are linked by arrows crossing the line to a box representing file based transfers and to a box representing dialogs. A box representing dialog patterns feeds into the dialog box. The dialog box in turn feeds a box representing dialog-based transfers.)

Slide 83:

Learning Objective #5

Data Element

An Atomic Piece of Information Related to a Person, Place, Thing or Concept

Slide 84:

Learning Objective #5

Data Frame

Grouping of Data Elements and Other Data Frames to Describe More Complex Concepts

Slide 85:

Learning Objective #5

Message

An Aggregate of Data Elements and Data Frames into a Larger, More Complex Structure

Slide 86:

Learning Objective #5

Dialog

TCIP Includes Eleven Dialog Patterns

  1. Publication (query, periodic, and event)
  2. Command-Response
  3. Report
  4. Silent alarm
  5. Load
  6. Unload
  7. Voice radio call (operator-initiated and dispatch-initiated)
  8. Signal control and prioritization
  9. Blind notification
  10. Push
  11. Traveler service request

Slide 87:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 88:

Learning Objective #5

How can TCIP be used to transfer data?

Answer Choices

  1. Transfer data in files and real-time dialogs
  2. Only transfer data in real-time dialogs
  3. Transfer data in publish-subscribe mode
  4. Transfer data only over the internet

Slide 89:

Learning Objective #5

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Transfer data in files and real-time dialogs
Correct! TCIP is intended for both batch file and real-time data transfers.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Only transfer data in real-time dialogs
Incorrect. TCIP can be used to transfer data in batch file transfers.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Transfer data in publish-subscribe mode
Incorrect. There are eleven different dialog patterns to transfer data in TCIP.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Transfer data only over the internet
Incorrect. TCIP is neutral with respect to electronic data communication mode.

Slide 90:

Learning Objective #5

Which statement most accurately characterizes a TCIP dialog?

Answer Choices

  1. A TCIP dialog is a sequence of data elements
  2. A TCIP dialog is a digital voice communication pattern
  3. A TCIP dialog is a structured exchange of messages
  4. A TCIP dialog is a message with two parts

Slide 91:

Learning Objective #5

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) A TCIP dialog is a sequence of data elements
Incorrect. A TCIP dialog is a sequence of messages.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) A TCIP dialog is a digital voice communication pattern
Incorrect. TCIP dialogs are used to transfer data.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) A TCIP dialog is a structured exchange of messages
Correct! TCIP dialogs typically follow a defined pattern that can be repeated.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect. d) A TCIP dialog is a message with two parts
Incorrect. A dialog contains messages which may have many parts.

Slide 92:

Learning Objective #5

Summary of Learning Objective #5

Understand the Fundamentals of Exchanging Information among Transit Business Systems and Devices Using TCIP Building Blocks

Slide 93:

Learning Objective #5

Summary of Learning Objective #5 (cont.)

Understand the Fundamentals of Exchanging Information among Transit Business Systems and Devices Using TCIP Building Blocks

Slide 94:

Learning Objective #6: Summarize the Content of the TCIP Standard, Tools, and Available Resources

Slide 95:

Learning Objective #6

TCIP Downloads Available from APTA

All TCIP Products can be downloaded free of charge from: http://www.aptatcip.com/

Slide 96:

Learning Objective #6

TCIP Support Tool Suite (cont.)

This slide shows items in three columns which illustrate the typical sequence in which TCIP tools are used and the purpose of each. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: TCIP Support Tools Suite (cont.) This slide shows items in three columns which illustrate the typical sequence in which TCIP tools are used and the purpose of each. Column one shows stages in the process. Column two show boxes labeled with the TCIP tools that are used. Column three shows the capability provided by each tool in the sequence. Starting at the top: "Interface Definition" is accomplished using the tool "TIRCE" which produces "Requirements Definition," Interface Specification, "and TCIP Compliant Documentation." The second stage, "Procurement," is accomplished using the tool "TIRCE" which produces an "Automated Comparison of Vendor Responses to RFP Requirements." The third stage, "Development" uses three TCIP tools, "TCIP Message Builder," TCIP Interrogator," and "TCIP Responder." These tools provide "Simulation Capability," TCIP Message Generation," and Data Logging/Viewing" The fourth stage, "Verification" uses the tool "TCIP Interrogator" which produces an "Automated TCIP Compliance Verification.")

Slide 97:

Learning Objective #6

TIRCE - TCIP Implementation, Requirements and Capabilities Editor

Slide 98:

Learning Objective #6

TIRCE Outputs

Slide 99:

Learning Objective #6

TCIP Message Builder

Slide 100:

Learning Objective #6

TCIP Interrogator

Slide 101:

Learning Objective #6

TCIP Responder

Slide 102:

Learning Objective #6

Overview of National Transit Institute (NTI) on-Site Training for TCIP Sponsored by fTa

Slide 103:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 104:

Learning Objective #6

Why does TCIP include a suite of tools?

Answer Choices

  1. To fix bugs in the standard
  2. To develop an agency architecture
  3. To allow developers to revise and re-ballot the standard
  4. To develop procurement documents and test compliance

Slide 105:

Learning Objective #6

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) To fix bugs in the standard
Incorrect. TCIP tools are not used to fix bugs in the standard.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) To develop an agency architecture
Incorrect. TCIP Volume 1 provides a concept of operations to aid in developing an agency architecture.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) To allow developers to revise and re-ballot the standard
Incorrect. TCIP tools are not used in developing and balloting the standard.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) To develop procurement documents and test compliance
Correct! TCIP tools include TIRCE to develop procurement documents (PRL and PICS) and the Message Builder and Test Console to aid in testing TCIP interfaces.

Slide 106:

Learning Objective #6

Summary of Learning Objective #6

Summarize the Content of the TCIP Standard, Tools, and Available Resources

Slide 107:

Learning Objective #7: Who is Using TCIP?

Examples and Real World Applications

Slide 108:

Learning Objective #7

Who is Using TCIP?

Examples and Real World Applications

This slide shows a snapshot of the FUTURE LYNX (Orlando) Agency ITS Architecture. Non-TCIP interfaces are shown by black lines connecting the boxes. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Who is using TCIP? Examples and Real World Applications – Lynx Pilot This slide shows a snapshot of the FUTURE LYNX (Orlando) Agency ITS Architecture. Non-TCIP interfaces are shown by black lines connecting the boxes. TCIP interfaces are shown by red lines. Descriptions for non-generic boxes in the LYNX Architecture Trapeze Scheduling is a Transit Schedule Development Platform. This system provides data to Trapeze BD and to aE Schedule Translation which uses TCIP to interface with aE Traveler Information/AVL, aE Advertising Manager and aE VLU Trapeze BD Transportation Operations provides bid processing, dispatch control, and timekeeping and sends data to Mentor CAD Mentor AVL provides near-real time bus tracking data to Mentor CAD and to aE Traveler Information/AVL Mentor CADD provides computer assisted management of buses while they are en route as well as for initial dispatch. LYNX Bus to Blocks is a LYNX IT Application that manages the daily assignment of buses to blocks (work assignments) which also provides information to aE Traveler Information/AVL Ontira Trip Planner provides customers with address-to-address trip planning by combining a routing algorithm with dynamic mapping and provides data to Ontira Multimedia which provides customers with service information via a variety of communications media (phones, internet, kiosks, etc.) )

Slide 109:

Learning Objective #7

Who is Using TCIP? (cont.)

This graphic shows the King County Metro architecture for Transit Signal Priority. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Who is using TCIP? Examples and Real World Applications (cont.) – Author's relevant notes, for illustration purposes only: King County Transit ITS Architecture This graphic shows the King County Metro architecture for Transit Signal Priority. TCIP will be used to communicate information that supports signal priority requests from buses to the traffic signal control system. The TCIP compliant interface is shown as a red line. The conversation between the Priority Request Generator (PRG) and the Priority Request Server (PRS) uses a different standard.)

Slide 110:

Learning Objective #7

Who is Using TCIP? (cont.)

MTA Bus Time Technology: http://bustime.mta.info/wiki/Main/Technology

This graphic illustrates the New York MTA' s bus customer information system architecture. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Who is using TCIP? Examples and Real World Applications (cont.) – MTA Bus Time Technology – MTA Bus CIS Concept Architecture. This graphic illustrates the New York MTA's bus customer information system architecture. TCIP is used in conjunction with other standards to communicate real time bus arrival data every 30 seconds from 5,500 buses to the central server. On the left are shown components on a bus, including the Operator Login Information which is sent to the Payment Terminal. An enhanced GPS unit provides NEMA standard location data to the Payment Terminal which then sends location and login data from the bus to a 3G modem. The Verizon wireless data network sends the data which uses standards including TCIP, JSON and HTTP to the CIS server in the MTA back office. Here, GTFS standard is used to send Schedules, Map and Route Data to the Bus CIS Server. TCIP is used to send crew dispatch data to the Bus CIS Server. The Bus CIS Server uses SMS to send information to customer cell phones, and uses the web to send data to smart phones, customer PCs, and digital displays.)

Slide 111:

Learning Objective #7

Who is Using TCIP? (cont.)

Examples and Real World Applications - AMT Montreal

This graphic illustrates how Montreals Agence Metropolitaine de Transport (AMT) uses TCIP dialogs to exchange data between two different CAD/AVL servers. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Who is using TCIP? Examples and Real World Applications (cont.) AMT Montreal -This graphic illustrates how Montreal's Agence Métropolitaine de Transport (AMT) uses TCIP dialogs to exchange data between two different CAD/AVL servers. A CAD/AVL Server for AMT is shown as a circle on the left. This exchanges data over a communications stack depicted as a triangle in the middle. On the right, a circle represents the CAD/AVL server for a sister agency, STL. The triangle segments in the middle illustrate the communication layers involved the exchange. Ethernet protocols are the bottom layer. TCIP is the next layer which is used to specify the dialogs. The messages in the dialogs are encoded in XML using the TCIP schema shown as the top layer.)

Slide 112:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 113:

Learning Objective #7

In what types of applications could my agency use TCIP?

Answer Choices

  1. Control center to control center
  2. Provide data to support Transit Signal Priority requests
  3. Communicate real-time bus arrival information
  4. Communicate between vehicles and base
  5. All of the above

Slide 114:

Learning Objective #7

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Control center to control center
Montreal is using TCIP for center to center.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Provide data to support Transit Signal Priority requests
King County is using TCIP to supplement transit signal priority request generation.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Communicate real time bus arrival information
MTA NYCT is using TCIP for real time arrival information.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Communicate between vehicles and base
LYNX will use TCIP to connect on-board VLU to passenger information system.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.e) All of the above
Correct! TCIP has been, and can be used for all of the applications in the question. Can you think of other interfaces for which using TCIP would benefit your agency?

Slide 115:

Review of Learning Objective #7

Who is Using TCIP? Examples and Real World Applications

Slide 116:

What We Have Learned

  1. Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP) is the ITS standard for exchanging information among transit ITS systems and components.
  2. TCIP facilitates competitive procurements by providing a non-proprietary standard, allowing the transit agency to go beyond a single vendor when looking to upgrade or add to an existing system.
  3. An agency ITS architecture provides a framework for interdepartmental ITS planning and coordination. It is a visual representation of the plan and vision for ITS development within the agency.

Slide 117:

What We Have Learned (cont.)

  1. The TCIP concept of operations describes ten Transit Core Business Processes and explains how TCIP can be used to facilitate communication among transit applications.
  2. TCIP building blocks consist of data element, data frames, messages, and dialogs.
  3. TCIP includes a suite of tools including the TCIP Implementation, Requirements and Capabilities Editor (TIRCE) to develop procurement documents (PRL and PICS) and the Message Builder and Test Console to aid in testing TCIP interfaces.

Slide 118:

Resources

Slide 119:

Next Course Module

Module 4:

Transit Communications Interface Profiles (TCIP),

Part 2 of 2:

Structure and Elements of TCIP—Accessing TCIP via

TIRCE and TCIP Tools

Thank you for completing this module.