ITS Transit Standards Professional Capacity Building Program

Module 5: Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2

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(Note: This document has been converted from a PowerPoint presentation to 508-compliant HTML. The formatting has been adjusted for 508 compliance, but all the original text content is included, plus additional text descriptions for the images, photos and/or diagrams have been provided below.)

Slide 1:

Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Welcome - Graphic image of introductory slide. A large dark blue rectangle with a wide, light grid pattern at the top half and bands of dark and lighter blue bands below. There is a white square ITS logo box with words "Standards ITS Training" in green and blue on the middle left side. The word "Welcome" in white is to the right of the logo. Under the logo box is the logo for the U.S. Department of Transpotation, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology.)

Slide 2:

Welcome slide with Mac Lister and screen capture of home webpage. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled "Mac Lister" has a photo of Mac Lister, Program Manager Knowledge and Technology Transfer, ITS Joint Program Office, on the left hand side, with his email address, Mac.Lister@dot.gov. A screen capture snapshot of the home webpage is found on the right hand side - for illustration only - from August 2014. Below this image is a link to the current website: www.pcb.its.dot.gov - this screen capture snapshot shows an example from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Development - Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office - ITS Professional Capacity Building Program/Advanced ITS Education. Below the main site banner, it shows the main navigation menu with the following items: About, ITS Training, Knowledge Exchange, Technology Transfer, ITS in Academics, and Media Library. Below the main navigation menu, the page shows various content of the website, including a graphic image of professionals seated in a room during a training program. A text overlay has the text Welcome to ITS Professional Capacity Building. Additional content on the page includes a box entitled What's New and a section labeled Free Training. Again, this image serves for illustration only. The current website link is: http://www.pcb.its.dot.gov.)

Slide 3:

Welcome slide with Jeffrey Spencer and screen capture of home webpage. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: This slide, entitled "Jeffrey Spencer" has a photo of Jeffrey Spencer, ITS Team Leader, Federal Transit Administration, Office of Research, Demonstration and Innovation, on the left hand side, with his email address, Jeffrey.Spencer@dot.gov. A screen capture snapshot of the home webpage is found on the right hand side - for illustration only - which is the same screen snapshot from Slide 2. Below this image and to the right is the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) logo.)

Slide 4:

ITS Transit Standards Professional Capacity Building Program

Module 5:

Transit Management Standards, Part 2 of 2

Slide 5:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 6:

Instructor

Head shot photo of the instructor, Carol L. Schweiger

Carol L. Schweiger
President
Schweiger Consulting LLC
Wakefield, MA

Slide 7:

Target Audience

Slide 8:

Recommended Prerequisite(s)

  Decision-Maker Project Manager Project Engineer
Module 1: Introduction to ITS Transit Standards N/A
Module 2: Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2 N/A

Slide 9:

Curriculum Path (Project Manager)

Curriculum Path for Project Manager: A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Curriculum Path for Project Manager: A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and a flow chart showing the logical flow of the modules with the current module boxed in red. The first three horizontally sequenced boxes are green, which means that it is a Recommended Prerequisite Module. The first box is "Introduction to ITS Transit Standards, Module 1." Below that, connected by a line, is a box with the text "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2." To the right of this box, is "Transit Management, Part 2 of 2," which is outlined in red. Below "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2", connected by a line, is a box with the text "TCIP, Part 1 of 2." To the right of this box, is "TCIP, Part 2 of 2." Below "TCIP, Part 1 of 2," the lines branch out into four boxes that are horizontally sequenced. The first two: "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2" and "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2" are green; the other two: "Electronic Fare Payment Systems," and "Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms" are blue. Blue indicates that the module is optional. Below "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2," is the text box "Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2 coded in blue. Below "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2", is the text box "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 2 of 2," coded in blue.)

Slide 10:

Curriculum Path (Project Engineer)

Curriculum Path for Project Engineer: A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Curriculum Path for Project Engineer: A graphical illustration indicating the sequence of training modules and where this module fits in. Each module is represented by a box with the name of the module in it and a flow chart showing the logical flow of the modules with the current module boxed in red. The first three horizontally sequenced boxes are green, which means that it is a Recommended Prerequisite Module. The first box is "Introduction to ITS Transit Standards, Module 1." Below that, connected by a line, is a box with the text "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2." To the right of this box, is "Transit Management, Part 2 of 2," which is outlined in red. Below "Transit Management, Part 1 of 2", connected by a line, is a box with the text "TCIP, Part 1 of 2." To the right of this box, is "TCIP, Part 2 of 2." Below "TCIP, Part 1 of 2," the lines branch out into four boxes that are horizontally sequenced. The first two: "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2" and "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2" are green; the other two: "Electronic Fare Payment Systems," and "Transit and the Connected Vehicle Environment/Emerging Technologies, Applications, and Future Platforms" are blue. Blue indicates that the module is optional. Below "Traveler Information, Part 1 of 2," is the text box "Traveler Information, Part 2 of 2 coded in green. Below "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 1 of 2", is the text box "Arterial Management & Transit Signal Priority, Part 2 of 2," coded in green.)

Slide 11:

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize key concepts from Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2.
  2. Illustrate the structure and use of data exchange standards for Transit Management systems.
  3. Select appropriate ITS standards for data exchange among Transit Management systems, and between Transit Management systems and Traveler Information, Fare Collection, and other systems (e.g., Traffic Management systems).
  4. Illustrate how to apply standards to the development of procurement specifications.

Slide 12:

Learning Objective #1: Summarize Key Concepts from Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2

Slide 13:

Learning Objective #1

Fleet Operations and Management

Category System/Technology Dependent on
Fleet Operations and Management Communications technologies Public/private voice and data communication backbones
Computer-aided dispatch (CAD) Voice and data communications technologies Automatic vehicle location (AVL) system Route and vehicle schedule data
Automatic vehicle location (AVL) Data communications technologies Global positioning system (GPS) or other location enabling technologies, such as Wi-Fi
Automatic passenger counters (APCs) AVL system Route and vehicle schedule data
Scheduling (fixed-route and paratransit) systems Stop database (contains data such as stop name, location, routes that stop at this stop, direction of travel from this stop, list of amenities available at this stop)

Slide 14:

Learning Objective #1

Fleet Operations and Management (cont.)

Category System/Technology Dependent on
Fleet Operations and Management Transfer connection protection (TCP) AVL system CAD system
Transit signal priority (TSP) AVL system CAD system (when TSP used based on schedule adherence status) Roadside signal infrastructure
Yard management Indoor positioning systems (e.g., radio frequency identification [RFID]-based, Wi-Fi-based)
Intelligent vehicle technologies (e.g., collision warning and precision docking) Varies by technology application and deployment
Lane control technologies AVL system CAD Virtual mirror Lane guidance systems Roadside signal infrastructure

Slide 15:

Learning Objective #1

Example of Central System Technology Relationships

Main Point: Shows the relationships among central Transit Management and other transit ITS technologies.

Example of Central System Technology Relationships. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant notes: Example of Central System Technology Relationships: This graphic shows the relationships among various Central System Technologies. Beginning in the center of the graphic, there is a red rectangular column representing the Central Server Configuration. In this column the following servers are represented in individual blocks from top to bottom: Database Server, CAD/AVL (Computer Aided Dispatch and Automatic Vehicle Location) Server, APC/ASA Mgmt. Server, Fixed Route Scheduling Server, TSP Server, IVR Server, Communications Server, and RTIS/Web Server. From the IVR Server, there is a gray line representing a wired connection that leads to a black box labeled "Central Phone System" with a smart phone icon above it. From the RTIS/Web Server, a red line representing data feed points down to a blue box labeled "Transit Agency Website." Coming from the left side of the RTIS/Web Server is another line pointing to blue box labeled "Third Party Developers." From the left side of the Communications Server, there is a dotted gray line that goes to a black box labeled "Comm Gateway" and branches upwards through three cloud networks (bottom to top: the Wi-Fi/Internet, Cellular Network, and Radio systems), going on to two separate yellow boxes. These boxes are labeled "Revenue Fleet" and "Non-revenue Fleet." From the Cellular network cloud, there is another dotted gray line going downwards representing the wireless connection to the Wayside DMS. Coming from the entire Central Server Configuration, there is a solid green line representing the LAN/WAN connection or VPN. This line goes through a light green box labeled "Transit Agency WAN and LAN" and branches out to a light blue section identified as the "Agency Configuration." Within the "Agency Configuration," the following items are represented in individual dark blue boxes (top to bottom): Electronic Payment System, Maintenance Management System, Video Playback Software, WLAN Download Manager, Workstations to access central systems, VCM Software, and TSP System. Outside the "Agency Configuration," the LAN/WAN connection also leads to a dark blue box labeled as "Future Systems."))

Slide 16:

Learning Objective #1

Example of On-board Technology Relationships

Main Point: Shows the relationships among on-board Transit Management technologies

Example of Onboard Technology Relationships. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant notes: Example of Onboard Technology Relationships: This graphic shows an example of the relationships among various ITS technologies onboard a vehicle. In the center of the diagram is a box labeled MDT (Mobile Data Terminal). Coming from the top of MDT, is a box labeled "GPS Receiver and Antenna" connected via a voice radio connection. Connected to the MDT via a vehicle area network are the Maintenance Network Gateway, farebox, headsign and APC. The APC is connected to the front-door sensor and rear-door sensor via an alternative link. Utilizing both a Voice Radio Connection and a Data Connection, the MDT is connected to the Voice and Data Radio. This is then connected to the RF antenna. Connected by another vehicle area network are the Interior DMS, the ASA Controller, and the DVR. The ASA controller is then connected to the PA System and Ambient Noise Control Microphone. The DVR is connected to internal and external cameras. Coming from the bottom of the MDT rectangle is a red line representing an Ethernet link. This link connects a Wireless Mobile Router/Gateway with cellular modem and WLAN card. This link continues and also connects to the DVR. To the left, the MDT is also connected to the following: Collision Avoidance, Odometer, Covert Alarm Switch, Doors, and Wheelchair.))

Slide 17:

Learning Objective #1

Safety and Security

Category System/Technology Dependent on
Safety and Security Fixed video surveillance Data communications technologies
Covert emergency alarm and covert live audio monitoring Voice and data communication technologies CAD system AVL system
On-board digital video surveillance No dependence on other systems
G-force monitoring AVL system

Slide 18:

Learning Objective #1

Maintenance

Category System/Technology Dependent on
Maintenance Engine and drivetrain systems monitoring OBD-II or Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1708/J1939 compatibility of on-board computers within engine and drivetrain
Maintenance software to schedule and track scheduled and unscheduled maintenance activities, and manage parts inventory No dependence on other systems
Fuel Management System No dependence on other systems

Slide 19:

Learning Objective #1

Data Management

Category System/Technology Dependent on
Other Enterprise database/ datawarehouse and reporting Open databases Data dictionary
Technology integration Multiple dependencies
Geographic information system (GIS) application Spatial data recording and management systems
Service coordination facilitated by technology CAD/AVL systems shared across participants Voice and data communications technologies
Open data for third-party application development Standard format for data such as General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) and GTFS-realtime

Slide 20:

Learning Objective #1

What Is the "Vee" Model

This is an image that describes the V model of the Systems Engineering Process Life Cycle. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Detailed Vee Diagram: This is an image that describes the V model of the Systems Engineering Process Life Cycle. The left side of the V represents concept development and the decomposition and definition of requirements into function and physical entities that can be architected, designed, and developed. The right side of the V represents integration and re-composition of these entities (including appropriate testing to verify that they satisfy the requirements) and their ultimate transition into the field, where they are operated and maintained. Each step in the life cycle is delineated by a decision gate. Starting from the left wing of the V and working down the V across the life cycle time line, it is broken into Regional Architecture, Concept Exploration, Systems Engineering Management Plan Framework, Concept of Operations, System Requirements, Subsystem Requirements Project Arch (HLD), Component Level Design and finally Software Coding Hardware Fabrication at the bottom of the V. Working up the V on the right side includes Unit Testing, Subsystem Integration & Verification, System Integration & Verification, System Validation, Operations & Maintenance, Changes & Upgrades and finally Retirement Replacement. There is a pullout box on the left side labeled Cost Cutting Activities with the listed elements underneath: Stakeholder Involvement, Elicitation, Project Management, Risk Management, Metrics, Configuration Management, Interface Management, Process Improvement, Decision Gates, Trade Studies, Technical Reviews, Traceability.)

Slide 21:

Learning Objective #1

Service Packages (SPs)

Slide 22:

Learning Objective #1

Service Packages (SPs) (cont.)

(11 public transportation SPs cont.):

Slide 23:

Learning Objective #1

Transit Management Service Package Example

Main Point: An example of one transit SP diagram

Transit Management Service Package Example. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Author's relevant notes: Transit Management Service Package Example: This graphic has a rectangular box in the center which is labeled Transit Management and is purple in color. Within Transit Management is another smaller rectangle labeled Transit Center Vehicle Tracking and is white in color. Above the Transit Management box is an oval labeled Map Update Provider, which is yellow in color. There is a line with an arrow from Transit Management to the Map Update Provider oval, which is labeled "map update request." There is a line with an arrow from the Map Update Provider oval to Transit Management, which is labeled "map updates." To the right of Transit Management is a rectangle labeled Transit Vehicle, which is purple in color. Inside Transit Vehicle is another smaller rectangle labeled On-board Transit Trip Monitoring, which is white in color. Above the Transit Vehicle box is an oval labeled Basic Transit Vehicle, which is yellow in color. There is a line with an arrow from the Basic Transit Vehicle oval to Transit Vehicle, which is labeled "transit vehicle measures." There are two lines with arrows from Transit Vehicle to Transit Management, which are labeled "transit vehicle location data" and "transit vehicle schedule performance." Below the Transit Vehicle box is an oval labeled Location Data Source, which is yellow in color. There is a line with an arrow from the Location Data Source oval to Transit Vehicle, which is labeled "position fix." To the left of Transit Management is a rectangle labeled Information Service Provider, which is white in color with cross-hatching. Below the Information Service Provider box is a box labeled Traffic Management, which is white in color with cross-hatching. There are two lines with arrows from Transit Management to Information Service Provider, which are labeled "transit schedule adherence information" and "transit probe data." There is a line with an arrow from Transit Management to Traffic Management, which is labeled "transit probe data." This service package monitors current transit vehicle location using an Automated Vehicle Location System. The location data may be used to determine real time schedule adherence and update the transit system's schedule in real-time. Vehicle position may be determined either by the vehicle (e.g., through GPS) and relayed to the infrastructure or may be determined directly by the communications infrastructure. A two-way wireless communication link with the Transit Management Subsystem is used for relaying vehicle position and control measures. Fixed route transit systems may also employ beacons along the route to enable position determination and facilitate communications with each vehicle at fixed intervals. The Transit Management Subsystem processes this information, updates the transit schedule and makes real-time schedule information available to the Information Service Provider.)

Slide 24:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 25:

Learning Objective #1

How many Public Transportation Service Packages are there in the National ITS Architecture?

Answer Choices

  1. 4
  2. 10
  3. 11
  4. 15

Slide 26:

Learning Objective #1

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) 4
Incorrect. There are 11 Public Transportation Service Packages.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) 10
Incorrect. There are 11 Public Transportation Service Packages.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) 11
Correct! There are 11 Public Transportation Service Packages.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) 15
Incorrect. There are 11 Public Transportation Service Packages.

Slide 27:

Learning Objective #1

Which of these is not a Public Transportation Service Package?

Answer Choices

  1. Transit Vehicle Tracking
  2. Multimodal Connection Protection
  3. Multimodal Coordination
  4. Broadcast Traveler Information

Slide 28:

Learning Objective #1

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Transit Vehicle Tracking
Incorrect. This SP is a Public Transportation Service Package.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Multimodal Connection Protection
Incorrect. This SP is a Public Transportation Service Package.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Multimodal Coordination
Incorrect. This SP is a Public Transportation Service Package.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Broadcast Traveler Information
Correct! It is not defined as a Public Transportation Service Package (but it is related to something that transit agencies do).

Slide 29:

Summary of Learning Objective #1

Summarize Key Concepts from Transit Management Standards, Part 1 of 2

Slide 30:

Learning Objective #2: Illustrate the Structure and Use of Data Exchange Standards for Transit Management Systems

Slide 31:

Learning Objective #2

Standards Facilitate Meeting User Needs

Slide 32:

Learning Objective #2

Standards Facilitate Meeting User Needs (cont.)

Slide 33:

Learning Objective #2

Standards Facilitate Meeting User Needs: Example

Slide 34:

Learning Objective #2

Standards Facilitate Meeting User Needs: Value

Slide 35:

Learning Objective #2

Standards Facilitate Meeting User Needs: Criteria for Evaluating a Standard

Slide 36:

Learning Objective #2

Standards Facilitate Meeting User Needs: Starting Point for Identifying Standards

Slide 37:

Learning Objective #2

Center-to-Infrastructure (C2I) Application Area Capabilities Related to Transit

Covers interface between transit management center and specific type of infrastructure: Dynamic Message Signs (DMS) and Transit Signal Priority (TSP)

Slide 38:

Learning Objective #2

Center-to-Vehicle/Traveler (C2V) Application Area Capabilities Related to Transit: Vehicle

Covers interface between transit management center and transit or paratransit vehicles

Slide 39:

Learning Objective #2

Center-to-Vehicle/Traveler (C2V) Application Area Capabilities Related to Transit: Traveler

Covers interfaces between traveler information providers and devices used by traveling public

Slide 40:

Learning Objective #2

Center-to-Center (C2C) Application Area Capabilities Related to Transit

Slide 41:

Learning Objective #2

Identifying Appropriate Standards

Applicable Standards

In general, the following standards are applicable to Transit Management deployments. To determine which specific standards- are applicable for a deployment you will need to determine which architecture flows will be needed for the Transit Management piece of your deployment. Contact your local FHWA ITS Division Specialist or an ITS Standards Program Field Support Team contact

Standard Development Status
APTA TCIP-S-001 3.0.0 Standard for Transit Communications Interface Profiles; Published
NTCIP 1102 Octet Encoding Rules (OER) Base Protocol; Published
NTCIP 1104 Center-to-Center Naming Convention Specification; Published
NTCIP 2104 Ethernet Subnetwork Profile; Published
NTCIP 2202 Internet (TCP/IP and UDP/IP) Transport Profile; Published
NTCIP 2303 File Transfer Protocol [FTP] Application Profile; Published
NTCIP 2304 Application Profile for DATEX-ASN (AP-DATEX); Published
NTCIP 2306 Application Profile for XML Message Encoding and Transport in ITS Center-to-Center Communications (C2C XML); Published
NTCIP 3003 Profile Framework; Published
NTCIP 9001 NTCIP Guide; Published
SAE J2266 Location Referencing Message Specification (LRMS); Published
SAE J2354 Message Set for Advanced Traveler Information System (ATIS); Published
SAE J2540 Messages for Handling Strings and Look-Up Tables in ATIS Standards; Published
SAE J2540/1 RDS {Radio Data System) Phrase Lists; Published
SAE J2540/2 ITIS (International Traveler Information Systems) Phrase Lists; Published
SAE J2540/3 National Names Phrase List; Published

Slide 42:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: Open Systems Interconnection (OSI)

Slide 43:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 44:

Learning Objective #2

Which one of these is not a layer within the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model?

Answer Choices

  1. Application
  2. Data Link
  3. Service
  4. Physical

Slide 45:

Learning Objective #2

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Application
Incorrect. This is Layer 7 within the OSI model.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Data Link
Incorrect. This is Layer 2 within the OSI model.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.c) Service
Correct! This is not a layer within the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) Physical
Incorrect. This is Layer 1 within the OSI model.

Slide 46:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: SAE J1708

Slide 47:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: SAE J1939

Slide 48:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: SAE J1939 (cont.)

Structure of Standards: SAE J1939. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Structure of Standards: SAE J1939 (cont.). To the right of the bullets on this slide, there is a table that describes the layers of SAE J1939. This diagram consists of three columns. The first column has seven rows. The top cell in this column is labeled "Application," representing Layer 7. The cell below it is labeled "Presentation," representing Layer 6. The cell below it is labeled "Session," representing Layer 5. The cell below it is labeled "Transport," representing Layer 4. The cell below it is labeled "Network," representing Layer 3. The cell below it is labeled "Data Link," representing Layer 2. The cell below it is labeled "Physical," representing Layer 1. The second column shows the number of the SAE J1939 document that corresponds to each Layer. The cell next to Layer 7, "Application" is labeled "SAE J1939/71" and "SAE J1939/73." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 6, is blank. The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 5, is blank. The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 4, is labeled "SAE J1939/21." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 3, is labeled "SAE J1939/31." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 2, is labeled "SAE J1939/21." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 1, is labeled "SAE J1939/11" and "SAE J1939/12.")

Slide 49:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: SAE J1939 (cont.)

Structure of Standards: SAE J1939. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Structure of Standards: SAE J1939 (cont.). To the right of the bullets on this slide, there is a table that describes the layers of SAE J1939. This diagram consists of three columns. The first column has seven rows. The top cell in this column is labeled "Application," representing Layer 7. The cell below it is labeled "Presentation," representing Layer 6. The cell below it is labeled "Session," representing Layer 5. The cell below it is labeled "Transport," representing Layer 4. The cell below it is labeled "Network," representing Layer 3. The cell below it is labeled "Data Link," representing Layer 2. The cell below it is labeled "Physical," representing Layer 1. The second column shows the number of the SAE J1939 document that corresponds to each Layer. The cell next to Layer 7, "Application" is labeled "SAE J1939/71" and "SAE J1939/73." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 6, is blank. The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 5, is blank. The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 4, is labeled "SAE J1939/21." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 3, is labeled "SAE J1939/31." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 2, is labeled "SAE J1939/21." The next cell below it, corresponding to Layer 1, is labeled "SAE J1939/11" and "SAE J1939/12.")

Slide 50:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 51:

Learning Objective #2

Which of these standards are on-board vehicle area network (VAN) standards?

Answer Choices

  1. SAE J1939
  2. ISO 11898
  3. SAE J1708
  4. All of the above

Slide 52:

Learning Objective #2

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) SAE J1939
This is an on-board VAN standard, but b) and c) are as well.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) ISO 11898
This is an on-board VAN standard, but b) and c) are as well.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) SAE J1708
This is an on-board VAN standard, but b) and c) are as well.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All of the above
Correct! All of these are on-board VAN standards.

Slide 53:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: GTFS

Slide 54:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards: GTFS-realtime

Slide 55:

Learning Objective #2

Structure of Standards:

Other Relevant Standards/Formats

Slide 56:

Summary of Learning Objective #2

Illustrate the Structure and Use of Data Exchange Standards for Transit Management Systems

Slide 57:

Learning Objective #3: Select Appropriate ITS Standards for Data Exchange Among Transit Management Systems, and Between Transit Management Systems and Traveler Information, Fare Collection, and Other Systems (e.g., Traffic Management Systems)

Slide 58:

Learning Objective #3

Life-Cycle Cost Considerations

Slide 59:

Learning Objective #3

Life-Cycle Cost Considerations (cont.)

Slide 60:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 61:

Learning Objective #3

Which of these issues typically drives the costs associated with using standards?

Answer Choices

  1. Adaptation
  2. Abstraction
  3. Testing
  4. All of the above

Slide 62:

Learning Objective #3

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Adaptation
Correct! A standard or organization may need to adapt to meet specific requirements.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Abstraction
Incorrect. Standards-based products usually have a higher level of generality and abstraction than one-off custom solutions.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Testing
Incorrect. Testing does not drive the costs associated with standards since operability was already tested when the standard was created. System components that use standards will work unless you have a proprietary system.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.d) All of the above
Incorrect. Only a) is the correct answer.

Slide 63:

Learning Objective #3

Case Study for C2I Flows: Interurban Transit Partnership (ITP), Grand Rapids, MI

Slide 64:

Learning Objective #3

Case Study for C2I Flows: ITP (cont.)

Case Study for C2I Flows. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Case Study for C2I Flows: ITP cont. To the right of the bullets on this slide is a photo of one electronic sign that displays real-time information for Route 1 operated by ITP. The first line of the electronic sign says "1 Division Depart." This means that Route 1, of which the final destination is Division, is departing this stop, which is located at ITP's Central Station. The second line says "1 Division 11 min." This means that the next bus on Route 1, of which the final destination is Division, is departing this stop in 11 minutes. The third line is a scrolling message that says "Signs are Currently Under Testing.")

Slide 65:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 66:

Learning Objective #3

What de facto standard did ITP's vendor use to successfully exchange data between the dispatch center and dynamic message signs in the field?

Answer Choices

  1. General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS)
  2. eXtensible Markup Language (XML)
  3. JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)
  4. Representational State Transfer (REST)

Slide 67:

Learning Objective #3

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS)
Incorrect. The vendor started the project using GTFS, but replaced it in the end.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) eXtensible Markup Language (XML)
Incorrect. The vendor did not address the issues with XML.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)
Incorrect. The vendor did not address the issues with JSON.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) Representational State Transfer (REST)
Correct. The vendor used REST.

Slide 68:

Learning Objective #3

Case Study for C2V Flows: Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA)

Slide 69:

Learning Objective #3

Case Study for C2V Flows: CARTA AVM

Case Study for C2V Flows. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Case Study for C2V Flows: CARTA AVM. To the right of the bullets on this slide is a photo of the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) dispatch center. The photo consists of three video screens that display dispatch information on a desk where the dispatcher sits.)

Slide 70:

Learning Objective #3

Using Standards to Facilitate Integration with Legacy Systems: TriMet Case Study

Slide 71:

Learning Objective #3

Using Standards to Facilitate Integration with Legacy Systems: Central Puget Sound Case Study

Slide 72:

Learning Objective #3

Using Standards to Facilitate Integration with Legacy Systems: Portland TriMet Case Study

Slide 73:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 74:

Learning Objective #3

Does complying with standards and using commercial off-the-shelf technology help make it easier to integrate existing systems with new ones?

Answer Choices

  1. Yes
  2. No

Slide 75:

Learning Objective #3

Review of Answers

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.a) Yes
Correct! Complying with standards and using commercial off-the-shelf technology can help save money, minimize risks, and make it easier to integrate existing systems with new ones.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) No
Incorrect. Modifying or customizing a particular technology entails greater risks, as demonstrated in the Central Puget Sound region.

Slide 76:

Summary of Learning Objective #3

Select Appropriate ITS Standards for Data Exchange Among Transit Management Systems, and Between Other Systems

Slide 77:

Learning Objective #4: Illustrate How to Apply Standards to the Development of Procurement Specifications

Slide 78:

Learning Objective #4

Read a Standard

Slide 79:

Learning Objective #4

Read a Standard: SAE J1939

CoreJ1939 Standards
J1939 Recommended Practice for a Serial Control and Communications Vehicle Network
J1939-01 Recommended Practice for Control And Communications Network for Qn-Highway Equipment
J1939-02 Agricultural and Forestry Off-Road Machinery Control and Communication Network
J1939-03 On Board Diagnostics Implementation Guide
J1939-05 Marine Stern Drive and Inboard Spark-Ignition Engine On-Board Diagnostics Implementation Guide
J1939-11 Physical Layer - 250k bits/s, Twisted Shielded Pair
J1939-13 Off-Board Diagnostic Connector
J1939-15 Reduced Physical Layer, 250K bits/sec, Un-Shielded Twisted Pair (UTP)
J1939-21 Data Link Layer
J1939-31 Network Layer
J1939-71 Vehicle Application Layer
J1939-73 Application Layer - Diagnostics
J1939-74 Application - Configurable Messaging
J1939-75 Application Layer - Generator Sets and Industrial
J1939-81 Network Management
J1939-82 Compliance - Truck and Bus
J1939-84 OBD Communications Compliance Test Cases for Heavy Duty Components and Vehicles

Slide 80:

Learning Objective #4

Read a Standard: SAE J1939 (cont.)

Slide 81:

Learning Objective #4

Read a Standard: GTFS

Filename Required Defines
agency.txt Required One or more transit agencies that provide the data in this feed.
stops.txt Required Individual locations where vehicles pick up or drop off passengers.
routes.txt Required Transit routes. A route is a group of trips that are displayed to riders as a single service.
trips.txt Required Trips for each route. A trip is a sequence of two or more stops that occurs at specific time.
stop_times.txt Required Times that a vehicle arrives at and departs from individual stops for each trip.
calendar.txt Required Dates for service IDs using a weekly schedule. Specify when service starts and ends, as well as days of the week where service is available.
calendar_dates.txt Optional Exceptions for the service IDs defined in the calendar.txt file. If calendar_dates.txt includes ALL dates of service, this file may be specified instead of calendar.txt.
fare_attributes.txt Optional Fare information for a transit organization's routes.
fare_rules.txt Optional Rules for applying fare information for a transit organization's routes.
shapes.txt Optional Rules for drawing lines on a map to represent a transit organization's routes.
frequencies.txt Optional Headway (time between trips) for routes with variable frequency of service.
transfers.txt Optional Rules for making connections at transfer points between routes.
feed_info.txt Optional Additional information about the feed itself, including publisher, version, and expiration information.

Slide 82:

Learning Objective #4

Read a Standard: GTFS (cont.)

agency.txt:

agency_id, agency_name,agency_url,agency_timezone,agency_phone,agency_lang
FunBus,The Fun Bus,http://www.thefunbus.org,America/Los_Angeles,(310) 555-0222,en

stops.txt:

stop_id,stop_name,stop_desc,stop_lat,stop_lon,stop_url,location_type,parent_station
S1,Mission St. & Silver Ave.,The stop is located at the southwest corner of the intersection.,37.728631,-122.431282,,,
S2,Mission St. & Cortland Ave.,The stop is located 20 feet south of Mission St.,37.74103,-122.422482,,,
S3,Mission St. & 24th St.,The stop is located at the southwest corner of the intersection.,37.75223,-122.418581,,,
S4,Mission St. & 21st St.,The stop is located at the northwest corner of the intersection.,37.75713,-122.418982,,,
S5,Mission St. & 18th St.,The stop is located 25 feet west of 18th St.,37.761829,-122.419382,,,
S6,Mission St. & 15th St.,The stop is located 10 feet north of Mission St.,37.766629,-122.419782,,,
S7,24th St. Mission Station,,37.752240,-122.418450,,,S8
S8,24th St. Mission Station,,37.752240,-122.418450,http://www.bart.gov/stations/stationguide/stationoverview_24st.asp,1,

routes.txt:

route_id,route_short_name,route_long_name,route_desc,route_type
A,17,Mission,"The ""A"" route travels from lower Mission to Downtown.",3

 

Slide 83:

Learning Objective #4

Rigidity, Flexibility and Change in the Application of Standards

Slide 84:

Learning Objective #4

Rigidity, Flexibility and Change in the Application of Standards (cont.)

Slide 85:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 86:

Learning Objective #4

A good approach to defining the functions of your system is to select items from manufacturers' datasheets.

Answer Choices

  1. True
  2. False

Slide 87:

Learning Objective #4

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) True
Incorrect. Selecting items from manufacturers' datasheets is not a good approach.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.b) False
Correct! Vendors may claim "conformance to the standards" but may not provide all features and value ranges allowed in the standard, so "cherry picking" from manufacturers' datasheets as you are developing your requirements and specifications is not a good approach.

Slide 88:

Learning Objective #4

Incorporate a Standard into a Specification for Procuring a Transit Management System

Slide 89:

Learning Objective #4

Incorporate a Standard into a Specification for Procuring a Transit Management System

Incorporate a Standard into a Specification for Procuring a Transit Management System. Please see the Extended Text Description below.

(Extended Text Description: Incorporate a Standard into a Specification for Procuring a Transit Management System: This flowchart indicates the progressive application of the standards. The first box is labeled "Concept of Operations: What you want the systems/devices to do." An arrow points downward toward the next box, which is labeled "Document your Requirements." An arrow points to the right toward the next box, which is labeled "Develop Test Procedures." The box labeled "Document your Requirements" is connected to a box below it with a down-pointing arrow. This box below is labeled "Select Functions that can be Standardized, and Identify Value Ranges or Specific Values Where Necessary." An arrow points downward to the next box, which is labeled "Select Specific Objects and Value Ranges Where Necessary to Meet Requirements.")

Slide 90:

Learning Objective #4

Structure of Standards: Excerpts from Functional Specification using J1708 or J1939

Slide 91:

Learning Objective #4

Test and Determine Conformance with a Standard

Slide 92:

Learning Objective #4

Test and Determine Conformance with a Standard (cont.)

Slide 93:

Learning Objective #4

Test and Determine Conformance with a Standard: Conformance Clause

Slide 94:

Learning Objective #4

Test and Determine Conformance with a Standard: Conformance Testing

Slide 95:

Learning Objective #4

Test and Determine Conformance with a Standard: Conformance Testing (cont.)

Slide 96:

Activity. A placeholder graphic with an image of hand over a computer keyboard to show that an activity is taking place.

Slide 97:

Learning Objective #4

Which of the following elements are included in a conformance testing program?

Answer Choices

  1. Standard or specification
  2. Procedures for testing
  3. Organization(s) to do testing, issue certificates of validation, and arbitrate disputes
  4. All of the above

Slide 98:

Learning Objective #4

Review of Answers

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.a) Standard or specification
This is included in a conformance testing program.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.b) Procedures for testing
This is included in a conformance testing program.

A small graphical red and yellow X representing incorrect.c) Organization(s) to do testing, issue certificates of validation, and arbitrate disputes
This is included in a conformance testing program.

A small graphical green and yellow check mark representing correct.d) All of the above
Correct! You need all of these elements for a conformance testing program.

Slide 99:

Learning Objective #4

Standards and Intellectual Property

Slide 100:

Learning Objective #4

Standards and Intellectual Property (cont.)

Slide 101:

Learning Objective #4

Standards and Intellectual Property (concluded)

Slide 102:

Summary of Learning Objective #4

Illustrate How to Apply Standards to the Development of Procurement Specifications

Slide 103:

What We Have Learned

  1. Service Packages represent slices of the physical architecture that address specific services like surface street control.
  2. The use of standards is desirable for both business and technical reasons. The principal benefits of standards are as follows:
    1. protection of investment
    2. interoperability
    3. improved quality and value
  3. Application areas provide a starting point for identifying the ITS standards and other resources, and are deployment-oriented categories that focus on commonly deployed ITS services or systems.
  4. Using standards in a deployment can greatly reduce component development costs, especially if standardized off-the-shelf components are available.
  5. The requirements or criteria for conformance must be specified in the standard or specification.

Slide 104:

Resources

Slide 105:

Next Course Modules

Students who have completed Module 5 may delve into the following PCB modules:

Slide 106:

Thank you for completing this module.